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Using the Tenets of the Problem-Centered Systems Therapy of the Family (PCSTF) to Teach the McMaster Approach to Family Therapists

Published on Mar 1, 2014in Family Process 2.68
· DOI :10.1111/famp.12065
Richard Archambault2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Rhode Island Hospital),
Abigail K. Mansfield11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Rhode Island Hospital)
+ 1 AuthorsGabor I. Keitner47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Rhode Island Hospital)
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Abstract
This article describes the videoconferencing training of a group of family therapists in the McMaster Approach to evaluating and treating families. A discussion of the key tenets of the McMaster Approach lays the groundwork for how these tenets were applied to training in a residential treatment agency for adolescents. The article serves as an example of how videoconference technology can facilitate extended training, even from a distance.
  • References (20)
  • Citations (3)
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References20
Newest
Published on Oct 1, 2012in Journal of Marital and Family Therapy
Heather J. Hair5
Estimated H-index: 5
(MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland),
Marshall Fine6
Estimated H-index: 6
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)
A phenomenological research process was used to investigate the supervision experience for supervisors and therapists when supervisors use a social constructionist perspective. Participants of the one-to-one interviews were six AAMFT Approved Supervisors and six therapists providing counseling to individuals, couples and families. The findings suggest supervisors were committed to their self-identified supervision philosophy and intentionally sought out congruence between epistemology and practi...
Published on Jun 1, 2012in Journal of Marital and Family Therapy
George M. Simon4
Estimated H-index: 4
The common factors debate conducted on the pages of this and other major family therapy journals has evolved toward a preliminary consensus that the therapist plays a crucial role in activating and effectively bundling common and model-specific factors in the delivery of successful treatment. However, Blow, Sprenkle, and Davis (2007) remain unconvinced that therapist-worldview/model-worldview congruence, which I have hypothesized plays a determinative role in enabling the therapist to effect thi...
Published on Dec 1, 2011in Family Process 2.68
Pieter le Roux1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UR: University of Rochester),
Carol Podgorski15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UR: University of Rochester)
+ 2 AuthorsSusan H. McDaniel33
Estimated H-index: 33
(UR: University of Rochester)
This paper addresses a growing need for cost-effective, outcome-based assessment in family therapy training. We describe the ROSCE, a structured, evidence-informed, learner-centered approach to the assessment of clinical skills developed at the University of Rochester Medical Center. The ROSCE emphasizes direct observation of trainees demonstrating clinical competencies. The format integrates both formative and summative assessment methods. It can readily be adapted to a wide variety of educatio...
Published on Oct 1, 2011in Journal of Marital and Family Therapy
Jonathan G. Sandberg22
Estimated H-index: 22
(BYU: Brigham Young University)
This introductory article briefly describes the purpose and content of the special section on Learning Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy, including a short description of the four manuscripts that follow and their relevance to clinicians regardless of model, training, or license.
Published on Oct 1, 2011in Journal of Marital and Family Therapy
Michelle Montagno1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Wright Institute),
Mira Svatovic1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Wright Institute),
Hanna Levenson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Wright Institute)
This study investigated the immediate and long-term personal and professional effects of a 4-day externship training in emotionally focused couple therapy (EFT). EFT externship training uses lecture, discussion, video vignettes, live demonstrations, and role-plays to convey an attachment-based approach to working with couples. The two samples included clinicians (N = 76) who completed surveys immediately before and after training, and a subset of these clinicians (N = 29) who completed measures ...
Published on Oct 1, 2011in Journal of Marital and Family Therapy
Lisa Palmer-Olsen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Alliant International University),
Lisa L. Gold1
Estimated H-index: 1
(AmeriCorps VISTA),
Scott R. Woolley9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Alliant International University)
Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) is an empirically validated relational therapy that recognizes the complexity of couple’s therapy and supports the need for specialized training of therapists. Until now, there has been little research on effective methods for EFT supervision and no systematic model for conducting EFT supervision. The findings of a qualitative study of certified EFT therapists’ experiences with EFT supervision and training are presented in this study, along with a systematic mod...
Published on Jan 1, 2010in Psychotherapy 1.62
Marianne Celano19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Emory University),
Chaundrissa Oyeshiku Smith8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Emory University),
Nadine J. Kaslow48
Estimated H-index: 48
(Emory University)
The competency-based movement continues to guide professional psychology. This has been highlighted through the establishment of essential foundational and functional competencies. The current paper focuses on the intervention competency domain and delineates its relevance within the field of couple and family therapy (CFT). We begin by providing an overview of 8 essential components of CFT: developing a systemic formulation, forging a systemic therapeutic alliance, understanding familyof-origin...
Published on Oct 1, 2007in Journal of Marital and Family Therapy
Thorana S. Nelson11
Estimated H-index: 11
(USU: Utah State University),
Ronald J. Chenail19
Estimated H-index: 19
(NSU: Nova Southeastern University)
+ 3 AuthorsLinda Schwallie1
Estimated H-index: 1
In response to a series of national policy reports regarding what has been termed the “quality chasm” in health and mental health care in the United States, in January 2003, the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy convened a task force to develop core competencies (CC) for the practice of marriage and family therapy (MFT). The task force also was responding to a call for outcome-based education and for the need to answer questions about what marriage and family therapists do. De...
Published on Feb 27, 2007in American Journal of Family Therapy 0.61
Jason B. Whiting5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UK: University of Kentucky)
Many family therapists have incorporated social constructionist and narrative ideas into their work with clients. These ideas emphasize postmodern tenets of collaboration, non-directiveness, and multiple perspectives. Although these approaches have become common in therapy, they are also useful in supervision. This article discusses how social constructionism can be applied in supervision, both as content to be taught and as a philosophy to be applied. A case study is presented that offers examp...
Published on Jan 24, 2007in Journal of Marital and Family Therapy
Michael M. Morgan5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UW: University of Wyoming),
Douglas H. Sprenkle36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Purdue University)
Despite the proliferation of supervision models, there is no evidence to suggest that any one model of supervision is in any way superior to any other. Many in the field have called for models that can bridge the various theoretical approaches to clinical supervision, and identify the essential elements of supervision. This article briefly explores the range of existing supervision models, and suggests a rationale for seeking factors common across the various models. The authors highlight the de...
Cited By3
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2019
Akram Wilson (Suez Canal University), Samir Ibrahim + 2 AuthorsGabor I. Keitner47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Brown University)
Given the improtance of the family in the etio-pathogenesis of psychopathology, family interventions have become a focus in therapeutic approaches in treating such mental disorders. This chapter covers the latest research in The Field of Family Interventions for Bipolar Disorders, Schizophrenia, and Depressive Illness. This area of research is advancing leading to new paragidm in “family-inclusive” therapeutic intterventions.
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 3.41
Ann Vander Stoep28
Estimated H-index: 28
,
Carolyn A. McCarty29
Estimated H-index: 29
+ 3 AuthorsKathleen Myers M. D. M. P. H24
Estimated H-index: 24
The Children’s Attention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Telemental Health Treatment Study (CATTS) tested the hypotheses that children and caregivers who received guideline-based treatment delivered through a hybrid telehealth service delivery model would experience greater improvements in outcomes than children and caregivers receiving treatment via a comparison delivery model. Here, we present caregiver outcomes. 88 primary care providers (PCPs) in seven geographically underserved commun...
Published on Mar 1, 2015in Family Process 2.68
Laura Staccini2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UNIBO: University of Bologna),
Elena Tomba21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UNIBO: University of Bologna)
+ 1 AuthorsGabor I. Keitner47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Brown University)
A large body of research, documenting the impact of a family's functioning on health outcomes, highlights the importance of introducing the evaluation of patients' family dynamics into clinical judgment. The Family Assessment Device (FAD) is a self-report questionnaire designed to assess specific dimensions of family functioning. This qualitative systematic review, which follows PRISMA guidelines, aimed to identify the FAD's clinimetric properties and to report the incremental utility of its inc...
Published on Mar 1, 2015in Family Process 2.68
Abigail K. Mansfield11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Rhode Island Hospital),
Gabor I. Keitner47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Rhode Island Hospital),
Jennifer Dealy2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UConn: University of Connecticut)
The current study set out to describe family functioning scores of a contemporary community sample, using the Family Assessment Device (FAD), and to compare this to a currently help-seeking sample. The community sample consisted of 151 families who completed the FAD. The help-seeking sample consisted of 46 families who completed the FAD at their first family therapy appointment as part of their standard care at an outpatient family therapy clinic at an urban hospital. Findings suggest that FAD m...