Match!

Ammonia toxicity in aerobic rice: use of soil properties to predict ammonia volatilization following urea application and the adverse effects on germination

Published on Aug 1, 2011in European Journal of Soil Science2.82
· DOI :10.1111/j.1365-2389.2010.01346.x
V. R. Haden6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Cornell University),
Jing Xiang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Rice University)
+ 3 AuthorsJohn M. Duxbury30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Cornell University)
Cite
Abstract
Recent studies indicate that aerobic rice can suffer injury from ammonia toxicity when urea is applied at seeding. Urea application rate and soil properties influence the accumulation of ammonia in the vicinity of recently sown seeds and hence influence the risk of ammonia toxicity. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the effects of urea rate on ammonia volatilization and subsequent seed germination for a range of soils, (ii) establish a critical level for ammonia toxicity in germinating rice seeds and (iii) assess how variation in soil properties influences ammonia accumulation. Volatilized ammonia and seed germination were measured in two micro-diffusion incubations using 15 soils to which urea was applied at five rates (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 g N kg -1 soil). Progressively larger urea rates increased volatilization, decreased germination and indicated a critical level for ammonia toxicity of approximately 7 mg N kg -1 . Stepwise regression of the first three principal components indicated that the initial pH and soil texture components influenced ammonia volatilization when no N was added. At the intermediate N rate all three components (initial pH, soil texture and pH buffering) affected ammonia volatilization. At the largest N rate, ammonia volatilization was driven by soil texture and pH buffering while the role of initial pH was insignificant. For soils with an initial pH > 6.0 the risk of excessive volatilization increased dramatically when clay content was <150 mg kg -1 , cation exchange capacity (CEC) was <10 cmol c kg -1 and the buffer capacity (BC) was <2.5 cmol c kg -1 pH -1 . These findings suggest that initial pH, CEC, soil texture and BC should all be used to assess the site-specific risks of urea-induced ammonia toxicity in aerobic rice.
  • References (28)
  • Citations (6)
Cite
References28
Newest
Published on Oct 1, 2009in Soil Science and Plant Nutrition1.42
Jing Xiang6
Estimated H-index: 6
(HAU: Huazhong Agricultural University),
V. R. Haden6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Cornell University)
+ 5 AuthorsKehui Cui22
Estimated H-index: 22
(HAU: Huazhong Agricultural University)
Abstract A yield decline and increase in soil pH under continuous cropping of aerobic rice have been reported in previous studies. However, the underlying mechanisms governing the poor growth and low yield of aerobic rice following an increase in soil pH are unknown. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of soil acidification on the soil nutrient availability, plant nutrition and growth of aerobic rice grown in continuously cropped aerobic soil. Two pot experiments were ...
Published on Apr 1, 2009in Field Crops Research3.87
C. Kreye3
Estimated H-index: 3
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute),
B.A.M. Bouman42
Estimated H-index: 42
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
+ 4 AuthorsL. Fernandez7
Estimated H-index: 7
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
Abstract Aerobic rice is a water-saving rice production system for water-short environments with favorable soils and adapted, potentially high-yielding varieties that are direct dry seeded. Soils remain aerobic but supplementary irrigation is applied as necessary. In the dry season of 2004 and 2005, a water by N experiment was set up at the location “Dapdap” in central Central Luzon, Philippines, to explore water and N management strategies in aerobic rice. The experiment was laid out as a split...
Published on Feb 1, 2009in Soil Science and Plant Nutrition1.42
Lixiao Nie21
Estimated H-index: 21
(HAU: Huazhong Agricultural University),
Shaobing Peng46
Estimated H-index: 46
(IRRI: International Rice Research Institute)
+ 4 AuthorsJing Xiang6
Estimated H-index: 6
(HAU: Huazhong Agricultural University)
Abstract Yield decline resulting from continuous cropping of aerobic rice is a constraint to the widespread adoption of aerobic rice technology. Shifts in water management from flooded to aerobic conditions are known to influence the availability and form of N present in the soil and might require a different approach to N management in aerobic rice. The present study was conducted to determine the effects of different N sources on the plant growth and grain yield of aerobic rice. Four pot exper...
Published on Jan 1, 2009in Journal of Environmental Quality2.58
Philippe Rochette43
Estimated H-index: 43
(AAFC: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada),
J. Douglas MacDonald4
Estimated H-index: 4
(AAFC: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada)
+ 3 AuthorsNormand Bertrand17
Estimated H-index: 17
(AAFC: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada)
Volatilization of ammonia following application of urea contributes to smog formation and degradation of natural ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of (i) incorporation and banding of urea and (ii) surface broadcast of slow-release urea types on NH 3 volatilization in a dry acidic soil. Volatilization was measured using wind tunnels for 25 d after standard urea (140 kg N ha ―1 ) was broadcast, broadcast and incorporated (0―5 cm), or incorporated in shallow bands (...
Published on Dec 1, 2008in Journal of Integrative Plant Biology3.82
Changying Xue3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CAU: China Agricultural University),
Xiaoguang Yang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(CAU: China Agricultural University)
+ 8 AuthorsHuaqi Wang5
Estimated H-index: 5
(CAU: China Agricultural University)
Aerobic rice is a new production system in which specially-developed varieties are grown under non-flooded, non-puddled, and non-saturated soil conditions. In 2003–2004, irrigation x Nitrogen experiments were carried out near Beijing using variety HD297. Water treatments included four irrigation levels, and Nitrogen treatments included different fertilizer N application rates and different numbers of N splits. The highest yields were 4 460 kg/ha with 688 mm of total (rain plus irrigation) water ...
Published on Jan 1, 2008in Journal of Environmental Quality2.58
Ana Cláudia Rodrigues de Lima7
Estimated H-index: 7
(WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre),
W.B. Hoogmoed21
Estimated H-index: 21
(WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre),
L. Brussaard49
Estimated H-index: 49
(WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)
Soil quality, as a measure of the soil's capacity to function, can be assessed by indicators based on physical, chemical, and biological properties. Here we report on the assessment of soil quality in 21 rice (Oryza sativa) fields under three rice production systems (semi-direct, pre-germinated, and conventional) on four soil textural classes in the Camaqua region of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The objectives of our study were: (i) to identify soil quality indicators that discriminate both manage...
Published on Jan 1, 2005in Soil Science Society of America Journal2.00
Min Liu3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UGA: University of Georgia),
D. E. Kissel12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UGA: University of Georgia)
+ 1 AuthorsPaul F. Vendrell6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UGA: University of Georgia)
Direct titration of acid surface soils is often used to measure soil acidity. However, titration has not been used for routine determination of the lime requirement (LR) in soil testing laboratories, because it is too time-consuming, requiring multiple additions of base and long equilibration times between additions. Since soil pH as a function of added base can be described well by a linear equation, titration may be adopted by soil testing laboratories using a minimum number of base additions....
Published on Jan 1, 2004in Agronomy Journal1.80
P. Jiang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MU: University of Missouri),
Kurt D. Thelen22
Estimated H-index: 22
(MSU: Michigan State University)
Understanding the variability of soil and landscape properties and their effect on crop yield is a critical component of site-specific management systems. The objectives of this study were to identify yield-limiting soil properties and to investigate the relationship between soil properties and topographical variables and their relationship to crop yield. Two corn (Zea mays L.)-soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] fields in Michigan were sampled, and 23 soil properties from the top two horizons up t...
TenutaMario25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UWO: University of Western Ontario),
George Lazarovits33
Estimated H-index: 33
(AAFC: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada)
The accumulation of ammonia in soil amended with meat and bone meal was previously shown to kill microsclerotia of Verticillium dahliae Kleb. This laboratory study examined to what extent cation-exchange capacity, moisture, organic carbon and nitrification, and high levels of sand and bulk density affect the accumulation of ammonia. Two soils were used as models: site B soil a loamy sand of low organic carbon content that when amended with meat and bone meal (2–2.5%) accumulates ammonia in exces...
Cited By6
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment5.59
Zhipeng Sha (CAU: China Agricultural University), Qianqian Li (CAU: China Agricultural University)+ 2 AuthorsXuejun Liu37
Estimated H-index: 37
(CAU: China Agricultural University)
Abstract There has been increasing interest in and use of biochar as a soil amendment. However, the effects of biochar addition on ammonia volatilization (AV) appeared contradictory from the many reported studies and the main influencing factors remain unclear. Here, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of 41 published articles with 144 observations to reveal the effects of biochar addition on AV and used a boosted regression tree modelling approach to further interpret the contribution of...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems2.85
Jinsen Zheng1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Kyoto University),
William N. Mmari1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsShinya Funakawa20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Kyoto University)
Enhancing crop production by maintaining a proper synchrony between soil nitrogen (N) and crop N demand remains a challenge, especially in under-studied tropical soils of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). For two consecutive cropping seasons (2013–2015), we monitored the fluctuation of soil inorganic N and its availability to maize in the Tanzanian highlands. Different urea-N rates (0–150 kg N ha−1; split into two dressings) were applied to two soil types (TZi, sandy Alfisols; and TZm, clayey Andisols)....
Published on Apr 1, 2018in Biology and Fertility of Soils4.83
Jinsen Zheng1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Kyoto University),
Method Kilasara10
Estimated H-index: 10
(SUA: Sokoine University of Agriculture)
+ 1 AuthorsShinya Funakawa20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Kyoto University)
Use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer is underway to increase in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The effect of increasing N rates on ammonia (NH3) volatilization—a main pathway of applied-N loss in cropping systems—has not been evaluated in this region. In two soils (Alfisols, ALF; and Andisols, AND) with maize crop in the East African highlands, we measured NH3 volatilization following urea broadcast at six rates (0–150 kg N ha−1) for 17 days, using a semi-open static chamber method. Immediate irrigation an...
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Environmental and Experimental Botany3.71
Xuejie Wan2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NWAFU: Northwest A&F University),
Wei Wu3
Estimated H-index: 3
(NWAFU: Northwest A&F University)
+ 3 AuthorsYuncheng Liao12
Estimated H-index: 12
(NWAFU: Northwest A&F University)
Abstract Poor seed germination and early seedling growth caused by ammonia toxicity following urea application are major constraints for wheat production. This study aims to determine ammonia volatilization caused by urea and its damage to seed germination, early seedling growth, and its associated physiological mechanism. Two petri dish experiments were conducted under four nitrogen (N) application rates (0, 0.58, 1.16 and 1.75 mg N g −1 soil) for six wheat varieties that differ in their ammoni...
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Plant Ecology1.79
Varun Varma5
Estimated H-index: 5
(TIFR: Tata Institute of Fundamental Research),
Siddharth Bharath Iyengar2
Estimated H-index: 2
(TIFR: Tata Institute of Fundamental Research),
Mahesh Sankaran6
Estimated H-index: 6
(TIFR: Tata Institute of Fundamental Research)
To develop generalised predictions regarding the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deposition on vegetation communities, it is necessary to account for the impacts of increased nutrient availability on the early life history stages of plants. Additionally, it is important to determine if these responses (a) differ between plant functional groups and (b) are modulated by soil drainage, which may affect the persistence of added nutrients. We experimentally assessed seed germin...
Published on Jun 1, 2012in Oecologia Australis
Viviane Figueiredo Souza1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Alex Enrich Prast2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UFRJ: Federal University of Rio de Janeiro)
O oxido nitroso (N 2 O) e um dos tres principais gases causadores do efeito estufa, alem de ja ser apontado como o principal gas destruidor da camada de ozonio neste seculo. Este gas e produzido naturalmente atraves dos processos de nitrificacao e desnitrificacao em ambientes aquaticos e terrestres. Taxas de emissoes de N 2 O tem sido amplamente estudadas em ecossistemas terrestres, porem comparativamente, estas tem sido negligenciadas em ecossistemas aquaticos continentais, apesar do recente re...