Icons / Logo / Facebook Created with Sketch. Icons / Logo / Google Created with Sketch. Icons / Logo / ORCID Created with Sketch. Branding/Logomark minus Citation Combined Shape Icon/Bookmark-empty Icon/Copy Icon/Collection Icon/Close Copy 7 no author result Created with Sketch. Icon/Back Created with Sketch. Match!

RIPE, the American School and diversity in global IPE

Published on Oct 1, 2013in Review of International Political Economy 2.80
· DOI :10.1080/09692290.2013.824915
J. C. Sharman18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Griffith University),
Catherine Weaver7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Texas at Austin)
Cite
Abstract
On the occasion of the Review of International Political Economy 's 20th anniversary, this paper systematically assesses RIPE 's claim to represent an alternative to the 'mainstream' study of international political economy (IPE) with several new sources of evidence. The first is the IPE component of a 20-country survey of international relations (IR) faculty, the second a database of books in the field. The third, and most important, is derived from coding 326 RIPE articles published 2000-10 to discover key cleavages and trends. These results are compared with those from prior studies of the 12 IR journals identified as the 'leading' journals by the Teaching, Research and International Politics (TRIP) project. The article concentrates on five key issues: paradigmatic orientation, epistemology, methodology, policy orientation, and demography. The results provide ground for scepticism that the 'American School' of IPE does or will define the mainstream. The findings further tend to confirm that RIPE has stayed relatively true to its founders' intentions in representing diversity in the global study of IPE.
  • References (16)
  • Citations (4)
Cite
References16
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2013in PS Political Science & Politics 1.34
J. C. Sharman18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Griffith University),
Catherine Weaver7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Texas at Austin)
Efforts to systematize our knowledge of international relations (IR) have tended to focus on journal articles while ignoring books. In contrast, we argue that to know IR we must know IR books. To this end, this article presents the first systematic analysis of such books based on coding 500 IR texts published by leading presses against variables covering methodology, theoretical paradigm, and policy application. We compare the results with those of the Teaching, Research, and International Polic...
Published on Jun 1, 2011in International Studies Quarterly 2.17
Daniel Maliniak8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego),
Amy Oakes5
Estimated H-index: 5
(W&M: College of William & Mary)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael J. Tierney15
Estimated H-index: 15
(W&M: College of William & Mary)
Using two new data sources to describe trends in the international relations (IR) discipline since 1980—a database of every article published in the 12 leading journals in the field and three surveys of IR faculty at US colleges and universities—we explore the extent of theoretical, methodological, and epistemological diversity in the American study of IR and the relationship between IR scholarship and the policy-making community in the United States. We find, first, that there is considerable a...
Published on Jan 1, 2010
Nicola Phillips13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Catherine Weaver7
Estimated H-index: 7
Introduction Nicola Phillips and Catherine E. Weaver Section 1: Perspectives on the 'American School' of IPE 1. The American School of IPE Daniel Maliniak and Michael J Tierney 2. The Old IPE and the New Robert O. Keohane 3. TRIPS across the Atlantic:Theory and Epistemology in IPE David A Lake 4. Ontology, Methodology, and Causation in the American School of IPE Henry Farrell & Martha Finnemore 5. Of Intellectual Monocultures and the Study of IPE Kathleen R McNamara 6. The Slow Death of Pluralis...
Published on Sep 1, 2009in New Political Economy 3.08
Mark Blyth20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Johns Hopkins University)
Published on Feb 16, 2009in Review of International Political Economy 2.80
Kathleen R. McNamara13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Georgetown University)
ABSTRACT The intellectual monoculture that we currently observe in American IPE, based upon an allegiance to liberalism, rationalism and quantitative methodology, is a misguided departure from the pluralism that once defined the discipline. This monoculture is evident in the way we currently train graduate students in IPE and in the gatekeeping practices of the leading international relations journals. Fortunately, there is a continued diversity of work appearing in other fora from that surveyed...
Published on Feb 16, 2009in Review of International Political Economy 2.80
Peter J. Katzenstein38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Cornell University)
ABSTRACT This paper responds to two issues raised in this special issue on the American school of international political economy (IPE). I react first to the assumed convergence towards an open economy politics (OEP) framework. While OEP clearly has merits, I find that its narrow conception of actors and interests neglects other approaches' insights into preference formation and institutions that would enable it to offer better explanations of political economy. Second, I respond to the perceive...
Published on Feb 16, 2009in Review of International Political Economy 2.80
Daniel Maliniak8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego),
Michael J. Tierney15
Estimated H-index: 15
(W&M: College of William & Mary)
ABSTRACT This paper uses the results of the Teaching, Research, and International Policy (TRIP) project: a multi-year study of the international relations (IR) field in order to discern the major characteristics of international political economy scholarship in the United States today. It finds that, like Benjamin Cohen's depiction of the American school, IPE in the United States is increasingly positivist, quantitative, and liberal in orientation. It employs data from a journal article database...
Published on Mar 1, 2008in Politics & Gender 0.78
Daniel Maliniak8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego),
Amy Oakes5
Estimated H-index: 5
(W&M: College of William & Mary)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael J. Tierney15
Estimated H-index: 15
(W&M: College of William & Mary)
Women now receive political science degrees in record numbers, but female representation among political science faculty still lags behind that of many other disciplines. Only 26% of the 13,000 political science professors in the United States today are women (Sedowski and Brintall 2007). According to our recent survey of international relations faculty in the United States—the 2006 Teaching, Research, and International Politics (TRIP) Survey—women comprise an even smaller proportion of IR schol...
Published on Mar 16, 2008
Benjamin J. Cohen26
Estimated H-index: 26
List of Illustrations ix Acknowledgments xi Abbreviations xiii Introduction 1 CHAPTER ONE: The American School 16 CHAPTER TWO: The British School 44 CHAPTER THREE: A Really Big Question 66 CHAPTER FOUR: The Control Gap 95 CHAPTER FIVE: The Mystery of the State 118 CHAPTER SIX: What Have We Learned? 142 CHAPTER SEVEN: New Bridges? 169 References 179 Index 199
Published on Dec 13, 2007in Review of International Political Economy 2.80
Richard Higgott23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Warw.: University of Warwick),
Matthew Watson25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Warw.: University of Warwick)
The following article is written as a sympathetic critique of Benjamin Cohen's recent identification in RIPE of incommensurable traditions of American and British IPE. It is also designed to engender further debate within the subject field on this most central of issues. Our argument is that scholars should beware the rigid terms in which Cohen identifies IPE's transatlantic divide, because simply by naming his two camps as polar opposites the invitation is open to others to entrench such an opp...
Cited By4
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2019
Jeff D Colgan (UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Competition and Change
Joscha Wullweber3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Kassel)
In recent years, a comprehensive debate has been taking place over the ontological, epistemological and methodological roots underlying the discipline of International Political Economy. A fundamental and sometimes fierce discussion arose over the questions of which research strategies should prevail, which methods should be applied and what kind of knowledge counts as scientific. The debate has tended to reduce the different positions and International Political Economy approaches to American I...
Published on Aug 20, 2018in European Journal of International Relations 2.76
Kiran Phull1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LSE: London School of Economics and Political Science),
Gokhan Ciflikli1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LSE: London School of Economics and Political Science),
Gustav Meibauer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LSE: London School of Economics and Political Science)
Following growing academic interest and activism targeting gender bias in university curricula, we present the first analysis of female exclusion in a complete International Relations curriculum, across degree levels and disciplinary subfields. Previous empirical research on gender bias in the teaching materials of International Relations has been limited in scope, that is, restricted to PhD curricula, non-random sampling, small sample sizes or predominately US-focused. By contrast, this study u...
Published on Sep 1, 2016in International Studies Quarterly 2.17
Jeff D. Colgan13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Brown University)
Recent debates about the state of International Relations (IR) raise the possibility that the field is losing its theoretical innovativeness due to professional incentives to churn out publications. Yet the claims made about IR far outstrip the availability of empirical data. Important assertions derive from a handful of examples rather than systematic evidence. This paper presents an investigation of what gets taught to doctoral students of IR in the United States. I find, among other things, t...