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Recovery dynamics of benthic marine communities from the Lower Triassic Werfen Formation, northern Italy

Published on Oct 1, 2015in Lethaia1.74
· DOI :10.1111/let.12121
Richard Hofmann12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Michael Hautmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Hugo Bucher37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UZH: University of Zurich)
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Abstract
Hofmann, R., Hautmann, M. & Bucher, H. 2014: Recovery dynamics of benthic marine communities from the Lower Triassic Werfen Formation, northern Italy. Lethaia, DOI: 10.1111/let.12121. The Lower Triassic Werfen Formation of northern Italy represents an important archive for Early Triassic ecosystems. Based on quantitative community analysis using species level identifications, we reconstruct the recovery of benthic ecosystems after the end-Permian mass extinction throughout this unit. The analysis of benthic macrofossil communities shows that incipient recovery has taken place during the Griesbachian and the GriesbachiannDienerian transition. A probable deterioration in environmental conditions is observed towards the end of the Dienerian. The Smithian part of the Werfen Formation is characterized by high siliciclastic input, which ceases around the Smithian-Spathian boundary. The Spathian marks the definitive phase of recovery in the Werfen Formation. The comparison of this pattern with other palaoegeographical regions suggests that both the Griesbachian recovery and the Dienerian decline were of inter-regional if not global extent, whereas the Smithian diversity low in the Werfen Formation is a local signal. In contrast to the recovery dynamics of ammonoids and conodonts, the SmithiannSpathian boundary interval was no caesura for benthic ecosystems. The Spathian recovery pulse is possibly also an inter-regional event, at least in the palaeotropics. These results are in contrast with the previously proposed scenario of persistent hostile conditions during the Griesbachian time interval and highlight an initial recovery phase restricted to Griesbachian times. Instead, the apparently sluggish recovery of benthic ecosystems was at least partly shaped by set-backs due to short-term environmental perturbations during the Dienerian.□ Diversity, early Triassic, palaeoecology, recovery, Werfen Formation.
  • References (52)
  • Citations (28)
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References52
Newest
Published on Oct 1, 2014in Earth-Science Reviews9.53
Carlie Pietsch4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SC: University of Southern California),
David J. Bottjer57
Estimated H-index: 57
(SC: University of Southern California)
Abstract The end-Permian mass extinction, 252 million years ago, decimated life on Earth including the benthic marine invertebrate macrofauna. A return to pre-extinction levels of diversity and complex ecological systems took approximately 5 million years. This review provides the most up to date synthesis of the progression of the benthic marine invertebrate macrofaunal recovery. We found the rates and patterns of the benthic recovery to vary both across the globe and between different investig...
Published on May 1, 2014in Palaeontology2.63
Richard Hofmann12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Michael Hautmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UZH: University of Zurich)
+ 6 AuthorsHugo Bucher37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UZH: University of Zurich)
Based on the quantitative community analysis using species-level identifications, we track the restoration of benthic ecosystems after the end-Permian mass extinction throughout the Lower Triassic of the western USA. New data on the palaeoecology of the Thaynes Group and Sinbad Formation are provided, which fill a gap between the recently studied palaeoecology of the Griesbachian-Dienerian Dinwoody Formation and the Spathian Virgin Formation. In the Sinbad Formation and Thaynes Group, 17 species...
Published on Apr 1, 2014in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Renato Posenato16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Ferrara),
Lars E. Holmer27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Uppsala University),
Herwig Prinoth2
Estimated H-index: 2
Abstract Linguliform brachiopods are traditionally considered a conservative group which seems to pass through the late Permian extinction without any significant loss and even appear to thrive immediately after the extinction peak. In the Southern Alps, lingulids are very common in the post-extinction Mazzin Member (early Induan) of the Werfen Formation. Sparse occurrences are also known in the overlying Siusi and Gastropod Oolite members (late Induan and early Olenekian in age respectively). T...
Published on Apr 1, 2014in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Carlie Pietsch4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SC: University of Southern California),
Scott A. Mata7
Estimated H-index: 7
(SC: University of Southern California),
David J. Bottjer57
Estimated H-index: 57
(SC: University of Southern California)
The end-Permian mass extinction event was the greatest loss of biodiversity ever experienced on the planet. The event is thought to have been triggered by the initiation of the volcanic eruptions of the Siberian Traps. The five million year recovery interval that followed the extinction event was strongly influenced by the environmental effects of sustained volcanic eruptions including extreme temperature events and persistent global and regional oxygen minimum zones. The effects of these enviro...
Published on Mar 1, 2014in Nature Geoscience14.48
William J. Foster7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Richard J. Twitchett35
Estimated H-index: 35
At least two-thirds of marine genera died out during the end-Permian mass extinction about 252 million years ago. An analysis of extinct and surviving taxa shows no substantial loss in global functional diversity, although there were significant losses in some settings such as tropical reefs.
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Paleobiology2.35
Michael Hautmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
Model calculations predict that pathways of alpha- and beta-diversity in diversifying ecosystems notably differ depending on the relative role of competition, predation, positive effects of species' interactions, and environmental parameters. Four scenarios are discussed, in which alpha- and beta-diversity are modeled as a function of increasing gamma-diversity. The graphic illustration of this approach is herein called a-b-c plot, in which the x-axis indicates increasing diversification rather ...
Published on Oct 1, 2013in Swiss Journal of Palaeontology
Arnaud Brayard23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Burgundy),
Kevin G. Bylund11
Estimated H-index: 11
+ 5 AuthorsEmmanuelle Vennin23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Burgundy)
Intensive sampling of the lower portion of the Thaynes and Moenkopi Groups (Lower Triassic) at separate localities within the Confusion Range, Pahvant Range, Mineral Mountains, Star Range, Kanarraville, Cedar City, Torrey and San Rafael Swell areas (mainly central and southern Utah, USA) leads to the recognition of a new key regional Smithian ammonoid succession. The new biostratigraphical sequence, which is more precise than the long-recognized Meekoceras gracilitatis and Anasibirites kingianus...
Published on Sep 1, 2013in Journal of Paleontology1.58
Richard Hofmann12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Michael Hautmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Hugo Bucher37
Estimated H-index: 37
Abstract The Dinwoody Formation of the western United States represents an important archive of Early Triassic ecosystems in the immediate aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction. We present a systematic description and a quantitative paleoecological analysis of its benthic faunas in order to reconstruct benthic associations and to explore the temporal and spatial variations of diversity, ecological structure and taxonomic composition throughout the earliest Triassic of the western United S...
Published on Apr 1, 2013in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology2.31
Michael Hautmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Andrew B. Smith21
Estimated H-index: 21
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
+ 1 AuthorsHugo Bucher37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UZH: University of Zurich)
The recovery from the end-Permian mass extinction event was a key interval in the history of life, but few modern studies provide systematic data on benthic marine faunas from the epoch immediately following the crisis. Here, the bivalve fauna from the early Spathian (Olenekian, late Early Triassic) Virgin Limestone Member of the Moenkopi Formation is comprehensively documented for the first time. The new genus Sementiconcha (Myophoricardiidae), type species Sementiconcha recuperator sp. nov., a...
Published on Feb 1, 2013in Geology5.01
Stephen E. Grasby31
Estimated H-index: 31
(U of C: University of Calgary),
Benoit Beauchamp29
Estimated H-index: 29
(U of C: University of Calgary)
+ 1 AuthorsHamed Sanei25
Estimated H-index: 25
(U of C: University of Calgary)
The Early Triassic record, from the Smithian stratotype, shows that the organic carbon isotope record from northwest Pangea closely corresponds to major fluctuations in the inorganic carbon records from the Tethys, indicating truly global perturbations of the carbon cycle occurred during this time. Geochemical proxies for anoxia are strongly correlated with carbon isotopes, whereby negative shifts in δ 13 C org are associated with shifts to more anoxic to euxinic conditions, and positive shifts ...
Cited By28
Newest
Published on Sep 6, 2019in Palaeontology2.63
Vanessa Roden2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Imelda M. Hausmann1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)
+ 5 AuthorsWolfgang Kiessling37
Estimated H-index: 37
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Lethaia1.74
Morgane Brosse8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Hugo Bucher37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UZH: University of Zurich)
+ 6 AuthorsMichael Hautmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UZH: University of Zurich)
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Ting Song2
Estimated H-index: 2
(China University of Geosciences),
Jinnan Tong26
Estimated H-index: 26
(China University of Geosciences)
+ 2 AuthorsYunfei Huang6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Yangtze University)
Abstract Immediately after the latest Permian mass extinction, bivalve faunas colonized the Permian-Triassic Transitional Beds (PTTB), especially in littoral clastic facies of South China. The Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) transitional bivalve fauna is composed of holdovers, long-term survivors and newly evolved taxa, and characterized by moderate diversity and high dominance. However, the taxonomy and ecology of this bivalve fauna of littoral clastic facies have not been well understood, especially i...
Published on Mar 29, 2019in Biology Letters3.32
Ashley A. Dineen2
Estimated H-index: 2
(California Academy of Sciences),
Ashley A. Dineen4
Estimated H-index: 4
(California Academy of Sciences)
+ 0 AuthorsMargaret L. Fraiser18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UWM: University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee)
The Permo-Triassic mass extinction (PTME) is often implicated in the transition from the Paleozoic evolutionary fauna (PEF) to the modern evolutionary fauna (MEF). However, the exact timing and details of this progression are unknown, especially regarding the vacating and filling of functional ecological space after the PTME. Here, we quantify the functional diversity of middle Permian and Early Triassic marine paleocommunities in the western US to determine functional re-organization in the aft...
Published on Mar 21, 2019
William J. Foster7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Texas at Austin),
Daniel J. Lehrmann26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Trinity University)
+ 4 AuthorsRowan C. Martindale10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Texas at Austin)
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Palaeontologische Zeitschrift1.27
Evelyn Friesenbichler (UZH: University of Zurich), Michael Hautmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UZH: University of Zurich)
+ 2 AuthorsHugo Bucher37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UZH: University of Zurich)
The Schlern and Seiser Alm area (South Tyrol, Italy) is a classical locality for studies of Middle Triassic platform to basin transitions, yet details of the palaeoecology of the rich benthic faunas of this area have been insufficiently known. We present herein a detailed palaeoecological study of the fauna from the Schlernplateau beds (Late Ladinian to Early Carnian) and the more or less time-equivalent Pachycardientuffe (Late Ladinian), which is based on quantitative faunal data. Both the pala...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Earth-Science Reviews9.53
Xueqian Feng4
Estimated H-index: 4
(China University of Geosciences),
Zhong-Qiang Chen34
Estimated H-index: 34
(China University of Geosciences)
+ 7 AuthorsChenyi Tu2
Estimated H-index: 2
(China University of Geosciences)
Abstract We report two shallow marine, ichnofauna-bivalve-microbial mat biofacies from the Lower Triassic Xiahuancang Formation of the southern Qilian area, Qinghai Province, northwestern China, which was located at moderate-high paleolatitudes on the northern margin of the Paleotethys Ocean. Paleoenvironmental analyses show that Members I and II of the Xiahuancang Formation represent a shoreface and a lower shoreface to offshore transition setting, respectively. Biofacies 1, recognized from Mem...
Published on Nov 1, 2018
Alexander Nützel22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
Andrzej Kaim17
Estimated H-index: 17
(PAN: Polish Academy of Sciences),
Eugen Grădinaru3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UB: University of Bucharest)
Published on Aug 1, 2018in Journal of Earth Science1.78
Yunfei Huang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Yangtze University),
Jinnan Tong26
Estimated H-index: 26
(China University of Geosciences),
Margaret L. Fraiser18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UWM: University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee)
After the end-Permian mass extinction, genus Claraia (Bivalvia) was the most abundant and most noticeable fossil during the survival and recovery stage. However, the reasons for the proliferation of Claraia are still debated. This paper describes a new Griesbachian (Early Triassic) mollusc fauna from deep-water settings in South China in the aftermath of end-Permian mass extinction. This fauna yielded five bivalve species in two genera (Claraia griesbachi, C. wangi, C. stachei, C. radialis, and ...
Published on Jun 12, 2018in PALAIOS1.64
William J. Foster7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Texas at Austin),
Silvia Danise11
Estimated H-index: 11
(PSU: Plymouth State University)
+ 1 AuthorsRichard J. Twitchett35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Natural History Museum)
Abstract The late Permian mass extinction was the most severe biotic crisis of the Phanerozoic, with associated environmental changes that included the expansion of hypoxic and anoxic conditions in shallow shelf settings. It has been hypothesized that wave aeration promoted oxygen transport to the seafloor providing a ‘habitable zone' in the shallowest marine environments that allowed the survival and rapid recovery of benthic invertebrates during the Early Triassic. We test this hypothesis by s...
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