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Crystallization of satellite tobacco mosaic virus. II: Postnucleation events

Published on Feb 1, 1993in Journal of Crystal Growth1.57
· DOI :10.1016/0022-0248(93)90805-7
A Malkin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
Alexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
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Abstract
Abstract Quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) was used to investigate nucleation and post nucleation events in the crystallization of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV). The diameter of monomer STMV was measured to be ≈ 16 nm, which corresponds well with data from electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction results. The data suggests that the rate limiting factor in STMV crystal growth is the diffusion of virus clusters to the growing crystal nucleus rather than the probability of incorporation. Our experiments demonstrate that for STMV, the aggregation process leading to crystal formation is distinctly different from that producing amorphous precipitate. The aggregation rate for crystallization is substantially higher with a power law exponent of n ≈ 0.33−0.54, while that associated with eventual amorphous precipitate was in the range of n ≈ 0.1−0.2. Our results provide additional evidence that QELS can be a useful tool for the rapid and nondestructive determination of the ultimate fate of solutions supersaturated with respect to macromolecules.
  • References (14)
  • Citations (18)
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References14
Newest
Published on Feb 1, 1993in Journal of Crystal Growth1.57
A Malkin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
Josephine Cheung1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
Alexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
Quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) was used to investigate homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation events in the crystallization of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV). Under conditions of relatively moderate supersaturation (σ ≈ 1.00–1.40), the critical nuclear size supportive of stable crystal growth, Rc, was estimated from time dependent size distribution analyses to be in the range of 30 to 7 virus particles respectively. From the same data, the molar interfacial free energy and the ac...
Published on Mar 1, 1991in Journal of Crystal Growth1.57
Stanley Koszelak12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
David Martin33
Estimated H-index: 33
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
+ 1 AuthorsAlexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
Abstract Time lapse video microscopy has been used to make qualitative observations of the events that transpire during normal and abnormal protein crystal growth. It has also been used to make quantitative assessments of growth rates for a variety of different protein crystals. From analyses of the growth rates, we have estimated that in the most rapidly growing crystals we have recorded, as many as 20 layers of protein molecules add to a single crystal face per second. In the slowest cases of ...
Published on May 1, 1990in Journal of Molecular Biology5.07
Vincent Mikol7
Estimated H-index: 7
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique),
Ernest Hirsch6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Richard Giegé53
Estimated H-index: 53
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
The translational diffusion coefficient D 25,w of hen egg-white lysozyme and concanavalin A from the jack bean is measured in various precipitating agent solutions as a function of salt and protein concentration using quasi-elastic light-scattering. With some precipitants, in undersaturated protein solutions, a protein or salt concentration dependence of the diffision coefficient of the scatterers is observed. It can be correlated with the inability of the protein to crystallize in this precipit...
Published on Jan 1, 1990in Biophysical Journal3.67
Webe Kadima4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
Alexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
+ 1 AuthorsFrances Jurnak25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
The aggregation processes leading to crystallization and precipitation of canavalin have been investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) in photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) mode. The sizes of aggregates formed under various conditions of pH, salt concentration, and protein concentrations were deduced from the correlation functions generated by the fluctuating intensity of light scattered by the solutions of the protein. Results obtained indicate that the barrier to crystallization of ca...
Published on Nov 1, 1989in Journal of Crystal Growth1.57
T. Azuma1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Tohoku University),
K. Tsukamoto16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Tohoku University),
Ichiro Sunagawa27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Tohoku University)
Abstract To analyse the clustering phenomenon, the diffusion coefficient in and the viscosity of the bulk supersaturated solutions were measured using quasi-elastic light scattering, and the concentration gradient in the diffusion boundary layer around a growing crystal interface was measured by means of Mach-Zehnder interferometry. The results obtained in case of tetragonal lysozyme crystals have demonstrated that (1) the solute particle size determined from values of both the diffusion coeffic...
Published on Sep 1, 1989in Journal of Molecular Biology5.07
Stanley Koszelak12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
James Allan Dodds1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
Alexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
Abstract Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV), a small T = 1 icosahedral plant virus, has been crystallized in a form suitable for high-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystals, which diffract to better than 2.5 A resolution, are of space group I 222 and have unit cell dimensions of a = 176 A , b = 192 A and c = 205 A . The centers of the virus particles occupy 222 symmetry points in the unit cell and one quarter of the virus particle constitutes the asymmetric unit, which is therefo...
Published on Jul 1, 1988in Journal of Crystal Growth1.57
Charles W. Carter7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Eric T. Baldwin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Lloyd Frick7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Abstract Statistical design of crystallization experiments greatly reduces the amount of protein necessary to find conditions for crystal growth and leads naturally to a useful data base for improving crystallization conditions in cases where the initial trials do not produce adequate results. Although it is counterintuitive to vary simultaneously all the factors to be screened, this apparent loss of control over experimental parameters actually costs very little in terms of the statistical stre...
Published on Apr 1, 1987in Journal of General Virology2.81
R. A. Valverde1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
J. A. Dodds1
Estimated H-index: 1
Summary A ssRNA, which has a satellite-like relationship with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), had an estimated mol. wt. of 0.38 × 106 and was found to be encapsidated in isometric particles with a diameter of 17 nm. The capsid protein had a mol. wt. of 18 × 103. This satellite virus of TMV (STMV) is highly immunogenic and no serological relatedness was detected between it and either TMV or satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV) or satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) in immunodiffusion tests with ...
Published on Jan 1, 1987
Hans Sonntag4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Klaus Strenge4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Brian Vincent50
Estimated H-index: 50
Colloidal dispersions play a very important role in nature, industry, and daily life. Sometimes, long-term stability is observed or desired as in ferrotluids (composed of very small magnetic particles with radii of 10 nm), which must be stable even in external fields. On the other hand, only short-term stable dispersions may be necessary during actual processing operations, for example, dispersions of magnetite particles during tape manufacture. The stability of dispersions and many of their phy...
Published on Aug 1, 1986in Journal of Crystal Growth1.57
Marc L. Pusey26
Estimated H-index: 26
(MSFC: Marshall Space Flight Center),
Robert J. Naumann8
Estimated H-index: 8
(MSFC: Marshall Space Flight Center)
Abstract A method has been devised for immobilizing protein crystals in small volumes under defined conditions in order to determine growth rates on various faces. Using this method, we have investigated the growth kinetics of the [110] face of tetragonal hens egg white lysozyme crystals at varying degrees of bulk supersaturation. The growth rate data were analyzed using a simple convective-diffusive model to determine an empirical relationship between growth rate and local supersaturation at th...
Cited By18
Newest
Published on Dec 2, 2015in Crystal Growth & Design4.15
Andrey O. Bogorodskiy2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Fedor Frolov1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 7 AuthorsValentin Borshchevskiy11
Estimated H-index: 11
Since the introduction of in meso crystallization of membrane proteins in lipidic cubic phase (LCP) by Landau and Rosenbusch in 1996, numerous studies attempted to elucidate the mechanism of in meso crystal nucleation and growth. Here we present a fluorescence microscopy study of the crystallization process of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. The crystallization starts with formation of microcrystals, followed by growth of a dominating crystal at the expense of smaller ones and fo...
Published on Nov 1, 2009in Progress in Biophysics & Molecular Biology2.70
Victor M. Bolanos-Garcia22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Cambridge),
Naomi E. Chayen33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Imperial College London)
Novel strategies and techniques that are based on conventional crystallization methods for crystallizing proteins are described and discussed. New directions for rendering proteins and protein complexes to become more amenable to crystallization are also presented.
Published on Jul 1, 2005in Progress in Biophysics & Molecular Biology2.70
Marc L. Pusey26
Estimated H-index: 26
(MSFC: Marshall Space Flight Center),
Zhi-Jie Liu34
Estimated H-index: 34
(UGA: University of Georgia)
+ 5 AuthorsJoseph D. Ng13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UAH: University of Alabama in Huntsville)
The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crysta...
Published on May 1, 2001in Biophysical Journal3.67
John Day10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UCI: University of California, Irvine),
Yuri G. Kuznetsov6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UCI: University of California, Irvine)
+ 2 AuthorsAlexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCI: University of California, Irvine)
Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was probed using a variety of proteases. Consequences of the degradation were analyzed using gel electrophoresis, quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Proteolysis rates of 30 minutes for complete degradation of the protein capsid, up to many hours, were investigated. With each protease, degradation of virions 17 nm in diameter was shown by QELS to result in particles of 10 nm diameter, which is that of the RNA core observ...
Published on Jan 1, 2001
Joachim Behlke27
Estimated H-index: 27
(MDC: Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine),
Otto Ristau9
Estimated H-index: 9
(MDC: Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine)
The use of analytical ultracentrifugation to elucidate crystallization conditions for proteins is discussed. The methods are based on careful enhancement of the protein concentration by sedimentation, leading to a partial formation of associates. The results can be monitored either from the broadening of the moving boundary in a Schlieren pattern or from the considerable concentration increase near the cell base. The conditions under which highly charged proteins are able to undergo a self-assoc...
Published on Dec 1, 2000in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces3.97
Yu. G. Kuznetsov19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UCI: University of California, Irvine),
Alexander J. Malkin22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UCI: University of California, Irvine)
+ 1 AuthorsAlexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCI: University of California, Irvine)
Abstract Biological macromolecules and particularly viruses, provide excellent systems for the study of crystallization from solution because of their relatively large size. The kinetics of their crystallization is at least an order of magnitude less than for conventional systems, and their large size permits visualization, both of crystal lattices and individual particles, by techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). This technique is especially powerful for biological macromolecules be...
Stoyl P. Stoylov11
Estimated H-index: 11
(BAS: Bulgarian Academy of Sciences),
E Stoylova1
Estimated H-index: 1
(BAS: Bulgarian Academy of Sciences)
+ 9 AuthorsEtienne Delain14
Estimated H-index: 14
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Abstract We have previously shown that in solution, depending on solute and solution conditions, an ordered aggregation of polyA–NCp7 complexes takes place. The kinetic behaviour of the polyA(homoribopolynucleotide)–NCp7(human immunodeficiency virus-I nucleocapsid protein) aggregating system was studied at physiological NaCl concentration (150 mM) using quasielastic light scattering measurements. The kinetic curves were fitted to a power law equation. For the aggregate size growth with time at i...
Published on Mar 1, 1997in Biopolymers1.84
Stoyl P. Stoylov11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique),
Constance Vuilleumier7
Estimated H-index: 7
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
+ 4 AuthorsYves Mély52
Estimated H-index: 52
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
The nucleocapsid protein NCp7, which is the major genomic RNA binding protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, plays an important role in several key steps of the viral life cycle. Many of the NCp7 activities, notably the nucleic acid annealing and the genomic RNA wrapping ones, are thought to be linked to a nonspecific binding of NCp7 to its nucleic acid targets. The mechanism of these activities is still debated but several clues are in favor of an intermediate aggregation of nucleic ac...
Published on Oct 1, 1996in Journal of Crystal Growth1.57
Franz Rosenberger30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UAH: University of Alabama in Huntsville),
Peter G. Vekilov47
Estimated H-index: 47
(UAH: University of Alabama in Huntsville)
+ 1 AuthorsB. R. Thomas17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UAH: University of Alabama in Huntsville)
Recently, much progress has been made in understanding the nucleation and crystallization of globular proteins, including the formation of compositional and structural crystal defects. Insight into the interactions of (screened) protein macro-ions in solution, obtained from light scattering, small angle X-ray scattering and osmotic pressure studies, can guide the search for crystallization conditions. These studies show that the nucleation of globular proteins is governed by the same principles ...
Published on Aug 1, 1995in Structure4.58
Alexander McPherson53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
A Malkin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
Yurii G. Kuznetsov4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
Thanks to Bob Cudney, Hampton Research, Laguna Hills, CA, USA for kindly providing Figure 11Figure 11. The research described here was supported by grants and contracts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.