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References16
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2014in International Journal of Epidemiology7.34
Ancel Keys70
Estimated H-index: 70
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
Flaminio Fidanza39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
+ 2 AuthorsHenry Longstreet Taylor38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
[INTRODUCTION THE NEED for an index of relative body weight was recognized from the beginning of anthropometry, that is to say as soon as serious attention was given to the dimensions of the body and their biological and medical implications. Body weight in proportion to height or to some function of height is interesting because it should indicate something about ‘build’ or shape and about obesity or fatness. Various indices of relative weight have been espoused and applied for many years but a...
Published on May 14, 2007in JAMA Internal Medicine20.77
Xianglan Zhang25
Estimated H-index: 25
,
Xiao-Ou Shu96
Estimated H-index: 96
+ 4 AuthorsWei Zheng110
Estimated H-index: 110
Background Increased abdominal adiposity has been linked to an increase in mortality in populations where many are overweight or obese; it is unclear whether the same is true in relatively lean populations. Methods We examined the association between waist-hip ratio and mortality in the Shanghai Women's Health Study, a population-based, prospective cohort study of Chinese women aged 40 to 70 years enrolled from December 28, 1996, through May 23, 2000, 95% of whom had a body mass index (calculate...
Published on Dec 1, 2006in Nature43.07
Jean-Pierre Després110
Estimated H-index: 110
(Laval University),
Isabelle Lemieux45
Estimated H-index: 45
Metabolic syndrome is associated with abdominal obesity, blood lipid disorders, inflammation, insulin resistance or full-blown diabetes, and increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Proposed criteria for identifying patients with metabolic syndrome have contributed greatly to preventive medicine, but the value of metabolic syndrome as a scientific concept remains controversial. The presence of metabolic syndrome alone cannot predict global cardiovascular disease risk. But abdominal o...
Published on May 1, 2006in Diabetic Medicine3.11
K. G. M. M. Alberti15
Estimated H-index: 15
(St Mary's Hospital),
Paulz. Zimmet1
Estimated H-index: 1
(St Mary's Hospital),
Julia Shaw1
Estimated H-index: 1
(St Mary's Hospital)
469 Abstract Aims To establish a unified working diagnostic tool for the metabolic syndrome (MetS) that is convenient to use in clinical practice and that can be used world- wide so that data from different countries can be compared. An additional aim was to highlight areas where more research into the MetS is needed. Participants The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) convened a workshop held 12-14 May 2004 in London, UK. The 21 participants included experts in the fields of diabetes, publ...
Published on Feb 1, 2006in International Journal of Epidemiology7.34
Marieke B. Snijder34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Rm van Dam1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsJ.C. Seidell83
Estimated H-index: 83
Numerous techniques are available to estimate body composition and fat distribution, and the method to use will depend on the aim of the study, economic resources, availability, time, and sample size. 6–8 Multi-compartment models, such as underwater weighing, dilution techniques and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) are all reliable methods to obtain accurate measures of total body fat. However, because of their costs in terms of time andmoney, thesemethods are not practical in large epidem...
Published on Dec 1, 2005in The Lancet59.10
Robert H. Eckel96
Estimated H-index: 96
(University of Colorado Denver),
Scott M. Grundy167
Estimated H-index: 167
(UTSW: University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center),
Paul Zimmet108
Estimated H-index: 108
Metabolic syndrome defines a group of risk factors underlying cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The criteria used to define this syndrome identify a larger phenotype which is related to a higher risk of developing cardiovascular and metabolic diseases than the simple addition of risks associated with each criterion. The metabolic syndrome is typically under-recognized in the clinical setting. To encourage its use, efforts have been made to unify its definition, with the aim of implementing ...
Published on Dec 23, 2004in The New England Journal of Medicine70.67
Frank B. Hu202
Estimated H-index: 202
,
Barry M. Popkin319
Estimated H-index: 319
+ 3 AuthorsJoAnn E. Manson231
Estimated H-index: 231
Background Whether higher levels of physical activity can counteract the elevated risk of death associated with adiposity is controversial. Methods We examined the associations of the body-mass index and physical activity with death among 116,564 women who, in 1976, were 30 to 55 years of age and free of known cardiovascular disease and cancer. Results During 24 years of follow-up, 10,282 deaths occurred — 2370 from cardiovascular disease, 5223 from cancer, and 2689 from other causes. Mortality ...
Published on Jun 1, 2004in International Journal of Obesity4.51
Janne Bigaard8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Kirsten Frederiksen38
Estimated H-index: 38
+ 4 AuthorsThorkild I. A. Sørensen77
Estimated H-index: 77
(Copenhagen University Hospital)
Waist and hip circumferences and all-cause mortality: usefulness of the waist-to-hip ratio?
Published on Jan 10, 2004in The Lancet59.10
Chizuru Nishida9
Estimated H-index: 9
to 25 kg/m 2 in different Asian populations; for high risk it varies from 26 kg/m 2 to 31 kg/m 2 . No attempt was made, therefore, to redefine cut-off points for each population separately. The consultation also agreed that the WHO BMI cut-off points should be retained as international classifications. The consultation identified further potential public health action points (23·0, 27·5, 32·5, and 37·5 kg/m 2 ) along the continuum of BMI, and proposed methods by which countries could make decisi...
Published on Aug 1, 2002in Obesity Reviews8.19
P. Deurenberg53
Estimated H-index: 53
(WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre),
Mabel Deurenberg-Yap17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Health Promotion Board),
S. Guricci1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UI: University of Indonesia)
Summary The objective was to study the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and body fat per cent (BF%) in different population groups of Asians. The study design was a literature overview with special attention to recent Asian data. Specific information is provided on Indonesians (Malays and Chinese ancestry), Singaporean Chinese, Malays and Indians, and Hong Kong Chinese. The BMI was calculated from weight and height and the BF% was determined by deuterium oxide dilution, a chemical-for-...
Cited By46
Newest
Published on May 24, 2019in Frontiers in Neuroscience3.65
Romina M. Uranga3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Jeffrey N. Keller58
Estimated H-index: 58
Published on Dec 1, 2018in BMC Medical Ethics2.51
Virimchi Pillutla1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Monash University, Clayton campus),
Hannah Maslen8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Oxford),
Julian Savulescu45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of Oxford)
Background In the United Kingdom (UK), a number of National Health Service (NHS) Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG) have proposed controversial measures to restrict elective surgery for patients who either smoke or are obese. Whilst the nature of these measures varies between NHS authorities, typically, patients above a certain Body Mass Index (BMI) and smokers are required to lose weight and quit smoking prior to being considered eligible for elective surgery. Patients will be supported and mo...
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Medical Clinics of North America2.72
Jagriti Upadhyay8
Estimated H-index: 8
(BMC: Boston Medical Center),
Olivia M. Farr19
Estimated H-index: 19
(BIDMC: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)
+ 2 AuthorsChristos S. Mantzoros103
Estimated H-index: 103
(BIDMC: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)
Published on Jul 31, 2017in PLOS ONE2.78
Janet Grant16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Catherine R. Chittleborough21
Estimated H-index: 21
+ 1 AuthorsAnne W. Taylor47
Estimated H-index: 47
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Obesity Research & Clinical Practice2.06
Odewumi Adegbija4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Wendy E. Hoy47
Estimated H-index: 47
(UQ: University of Queensland)
+ 1 AuthorsZhiqiang Wang13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Summary Objective Although elevated body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) have been identified as risk factors for mortality, data from the Australian Aboriginal communities are scarce. This study examined the associations of BMI and WC with all-cause mortality in an Australian Aboriginal community. Methods A total of 934 Aboriginal adults, aged 18–76 years, who participated in a community-wide screening programme in Australia's Northern Territory from 1992 to 1998, were followed-up...
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Journal of the American Heart Association4.66
Fangjian Guo11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UTMB: University of Texas Medical Branch),
W. Garvey54
Estimated H-index: 54
(UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)
BackgroundNo study has quantified trends in the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular health metrics among obese people in the United States in recent years. Methods and ResultsWe examined the secular changes in cardiovascular health metrics and key cardiovascular disease risk factors among obese adults (aged ≥20 years) in the United States. We included 18 626 obese adults (body mass index ≥30) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III ...
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Obesity3.97
Fangjian Guo11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UTMB: University of Texas Medical Branch),
W. Garvey54
Estimated H-index: 54
(UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)
Objective To assess the stability of metabolic status and body mass index (BMI) status and their relative contribution to risk of diabetes, cardiovascular events, and mortality. Methods A total of 14,685 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study and 4,990 from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study were included. People with healthy obesity (HO) are defined as those meeting all three indices of blood pressure, blood glucose, and blood lipids. People with...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health3.87
Klodian Dhana15
Estimated H-index: 15
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam),
Maryam Kavousi39
Estimated H-index: 39
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)
+ 3 AuthorsOscar H. Franco74
Estimated H-index: 74
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)
Background The association of body mass index (BMI) with mortality remains controversial among the middle-aged and elderly. Moreover, the contribution of other anthropometric measures to predict mortality is unclear. Methods We assessed the association of BMI, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and a body shape index (ABSI=WC/(BMI 2/3 ×height 1/2 )) with total, cardiovascular and cancer mortality by using Cox proportion hazard models among 2626 men a...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Nursing & Health Sciences1.32
EunSeok Cha11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Emory University),
Margeaux K. Akazawa1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Emory University)
+ 4 AuthorsSandra B. Dunbar Rn Dsn Faan Faha37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Emory University)
Obesity among young adults is a growing problem in the United States and is related to unhealthy lifestyle habits, such as high caloric intake and inadequate exercise. Accurate assessment of lifestyle habits across obesity stages is important for informing age-specific intervention strategies to prevent and reduce obesity progression. Using a modified version of the Edmonton Obesity Staging System (mEOSS), a new scale for defining obesity risk and predicting obesity morbidity and mortality, this...