Match!

Creativity in scientific teams: Unpacking novelty and impact

Published on Apr 1, 2015in Research Policy5.42
· DOI :10.1016/j.respol.2014.10.007
You-Na Lee6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
John Walsii28
Estimated H-index: 28
(GRIPS: National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies),
Jian Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
Cite
Abstract
The increasing dominance of team science highlights the importance of understanding the effects of team composition on the creativity of research results. In this paper, we analyze the effect of team size, and field and task variety on creativity. Furthermore, we unpack two facets of creativity in science: novelty and impact. We find that increasing team size has an inverted-U shaped relation with novelty. We also find that the size–novelty relationship is largely due to the relation between size and team field or task variety, consistent with the information processing perspective. On the other hand, team size has a continually increasing relation with the likelihood of a high-impact paper. Furthermore, variety does not have a direct effect on impact, net of novelty. This study develops our understanding of team science and highlights the need for a governance approach to scientific work. We also advance the creativity literature by providing an ex ante objective bibliometric measure that distinguishes novelty from impact, and illustrate the distinct team-level drivers of each. We conclude with a discussion of the policy implications of our findings.
  • References (122)
  • Citations (52)
Cite
References122
Newest
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Research Policy5.42
John Walsii28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Georgia Institute of Technology),
You-Na Lee6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
While science is traditionally treated as a distinct domain of work organization, increasingly science is organized around larger and larger work groups that resemble small firms, with knowledge as the product. The growth of organized science raises the question of whether we also see a bureaucratic structuring of scientific work groups as predicted by organization theory, with implications for the academic credit system and scientific labor markets. Building on organization theory, we examine t...
Published on Jul 1, 2014in Academy of Management Review10.63
Sarah Harvey7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UCL: University College London)
This article provides insight into how some groups achieve extraordinary levels of creativity by reconsidering the collective process through which new ideas develop. Previous research has been premised on a model in which idea generation stimulated by divergent input increases the variance in ideas a group generates and therefore increases the chance that one of the group's ideas will be a radical, breakthrough creative product. In contrast, I present a dialectical model in which the integratio...
Published on Apr 1, 2014in Journal of Informetrics3.88
Jian Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
One problem confronting the use of citation-based metrics in science studies and research evaluations is the Matthew effect. This paper reviews the role of citations in science and decomposes the Matthew effect in citations into three components: networking, prestige, and appropriateness. The networking and prestige effects challenge the validity of citation-based metrics, but the appropriateness effect does not. Using panel data of 1279 solo-authored papers’ citation histories and fixed effects...
Published on Dec 1, 2013in American Journal of Preventive Medicine4.43
Amanda L. Vogel8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Leidos),
Kara L. Hall16
Estimated H-index: 16
+ 11 AuthorsKevin Patrick48
Estimated H-index: 48
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego)
Introduction Research teams, ranging from pairs of collaborators to large networks, are becoming the dominant paradigm in knowledge production. Across all research fields, teams now produce more frequently cited and higher impact research than individual authors. This trend—known as “team science” or “team-based research”—has emerged as a strategy to address increasingly complex scientific problems, often by applying sophisticated conceptual and methodologic approaches that draw on multiple disc...
Published on Oct 25, 2013in Science41.04
Brian Uzzi34
Estimated H-index: 34
(NU: Northwestern University),
Satyam Mukherjee9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NU: Northwestern University)
+ 1 AuthorsBenjamin F. Jones20
Estimated H-index: 20
(NU: Northwestern University)
Novelty is an essential feature of creative ideas, yet the building blocks of new ideas are often embodied in existing knowledge. From this perspective, balancing atypical knowledge with conventional knowledge may be critical to the link between innovativeness and impact. Our analysis of 17.9 million papers spanning all scientific fields suggests that science follows a nearly universal pattern: The highest-impact science is primarily grounded in exceptionally conventional combinations of prior w...
Published on Sep 1, 2013in Administrative Science Quarterly8.02
Sarah Harvey7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UCL: University College London),
Chia-yu Kou2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UCL: University College London)
Research on group creativity has concentrated on explaining how the group context influences idea generation and has conceptualized the evaluation of creative ideas as a process of convergent decision making that takes place after ideas are generated to improve the quality of the group's creative output. We challenge this view by exploring the situated nature of evaluations that occur throughout the creative process. We present an inductive qualitative pro- cess analysis of four U.S. healthcare ...
Published on Jun 1, 2013in Psychological Science4.90
Jonathon N. Cummings26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Duke University),
Sara Kiesler76
Estimated H-index: 76
(CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)
+ 1 AuthorsAruna D. Balakrishnan6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)
Heterogeneous groups are valuable, but differences among members can weaken group identification. Weak group identification may be especially problematic in larger groups, which, in contrast with smaller groups, require more attention to motivating members and coordinating their tasks. We hypothesized that as groups increase in size, productivity would decrease with greater heterogeneity. We studied the longitudinal productivity of 549 research groups varying in disciplinary heterogeneity, insti...
Published on Jun 1, 2013in Academy of Management Journal7.19
Anne Nederveen Pieterse5
Estimated H-index: 5
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam),
Knippenberg van D61
Estimated H-index: 61
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam),
Dirk van Dierendonck29
Estimated H-index: 29
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)
As workforce diversity increases, knowledge of factors influencing whether cultural diversity results in team performance benefits is of growing importance. Complementing and extending earlier research, we develop and test theory about how achievement setting readily activates team member goal orientations that influence the diversity-performance relationship. In two studies, we identify goal orientation as a moderator of the performance benefits of cultural diversity and team information elabor...
Published on May 1, 2013in Social Networks2.95
Mengxiao Zhu5
Estimated H-index: 5
(RU: Rutgers University),
Yun Huang15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NU: Northwestern University),
Noshir Contractor36
Estimated H-index: 36
(NU: Northwestern University)
Abstract This study investigates the self-assembly mechanisms of ad hoc project teams using a bipartite network perspective. Individuals and projects are modeled as two types of nodes and team membership as relations between them. This approach enables us to investigate factors that impact voluntary team assembly at the individual, dyadic, and team levels simultaneously. Using Exponential Random Graph Models (ERGM/ p *), we study players’ combat teams in a Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playi...
Cited By52
Newest
Published on Sep 17, 2019in arXiv: Physics and Society
Milan Janosov , Federico Battiston10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Roberta Sinatra (ITU: IT University of Copenhagen)
Luck is considered to be a crucial ingredient to achieve impact in all creative domains, despite their diversity. For instance, in science, the movie industry, music, and art, the occurrence of the highest impact work and of a hot streak within a creative career are very difficult to predict. Are there domains that are more prone to luck than others? Here, we provide new insights on the role of randomness in impact in creative careers in two ways: (i) we systematically untangle luck and individu...
Published on Jun 14, 2019in Scientometrics2.77
Guoqiang Liang (DUT: Dalian University of Technology), Haiyan Hou4
Estimated H-index: 4
(DUT: Dalian University of Technology)
+ 1 AuthorsZhigang Hu5
Estimated H-index: 5
(DUT: Dalian University of Technology)
The creative process is essentially Darwinian and only a small proportion of creative ideas are selected for further development. However, the threshold that identifies this small fraction of successfully disseminated creative ideas at their early stage has not been thoroughly analyzed through the lens of Rogers’s innovation diffusion theory. Here, we take highly cited (top 1%) research papers as an example of the most successfully disseminated creative ideas and explore the time it takes and ci...
Published on 2019in Creativity Research Journal1.13
Weili Zhu (PKU: Peking University), Siyuan Shang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(PKU: Peking University)
+ 2 AuthorsYanjie Su19
Estimated H-index: 19
(PKU: Peking University)
Published on Jun 17, 2019in Nature Human Behaviour
Henrik Dimke17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Southern Denmark),
Maria Theresa Norn (AU: Aarhus University)+ 2 AuthorsN. T. Zinner18
Estimated H-index: 18
(AU: Aarhus University)
Scientists’ own perspectives on research funding are often missing. To address this, we surveyed Danish scientists about their ideal research grant. In contrast to a trend towards larger grants, most surveyed scientists prefer small or mid-sized grants to pursue their ideas and advance their scientific careers.
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Research Policy5.42
Reinhilde Veugelers2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Bruegel),
Jian Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
Abstract This paper explores the complex relationship between scientific novelty and technological impact. We measure novel science as publications which make new combinations of prior knowledge, as reflected in new combinations of journals in their references, and trace links between science and technology by scientific references in patent applications. We draw on all the Web of Science SCIE journal articles published in 2001 and all the patents in PATSTAT (October 2013 edition). We find that ...
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Research Policy5.42
Dong Huo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(HIT: Harbin Institute of Technology),
Kazuyuki Motohashi19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UTokyo: University of Tokyo),
Han Gong (SUFE: Shanghai University of Finance and Economics)
Abstract How team composition exactly influences innovation outcomes remains a complex and unsolved puzzle in the literature on creativity and innovation. Our study differentiates two types of team technology-related diversity—technological dissimilarity and technological variety, and investigates their influences on the impact of an invention created by a team. Analyses of over half million U.S. utility patents in the 1991–2005 period invented by teams reveal that technological variety of team ...
Published on 2019in Research Policy5.42
Caroline S. Wagner18
Estimated H-index: 18
(OSU: Ohio State University),
Travis A. Whetsell5
Estimated H-index: 5
(FIU: Florida International University),
Satyam Mukherjee (Indian Institute of Management Udaipur)
Abstract Research articles produced through international collaboration are more highly cited than other work, but are they also more novel? Using measures developed by Uzzi et al. (2013) , and replicated by Boyack and Klavans (2014) , this article tests for novelty and conventionality in international research collaboration. Scholars have found that coauthored articles are more novel and have suggested that diverse groups have a greater chance of producing creative work. As such, we expected to...
Published on Apr 3, 2019in Journal of Intellectual Capital
Jesús de Frutos-Belizón (UCA: University of Cádiz), Fernando Martín-Alcázar7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UCA: University of Cádiz),
Gonzalo Sánchez-Gardey3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UCA: University of Cádiz)
The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and validation of an instrument for measuring intellectual capital in the academic research context. The current research context describes a new paradigm of scientific production characterized by interdisciplinarity, heterogeneity and the intensification of the relations between the generators of knowledge. In this scenario, traditional measures of intellectual capital do not capture all the variables that make up the environment in which...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Research Policy5.42
Beatrice D’Ippolito3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Ebor: University of York),
Charles-Clemens Rüling6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Grenoble School of Management)
Abstract Over the past decades, Large Scale Research Infrastructures (LSRIs) have come to play a central role in providing scientist-users access to highly specialised scientific instrumentation and experimental conditions. Collaborations between (permanent) instrument scientists and users are at the core of these organisations, yet knowledge about the nature of such collaborations and their development over time is surprisingly scarce. In particular, we know very little about the interrelation ...
Published on May 6, 2019in Studies in Higher Education2.85
Hugo Horta16
Estimated H-index: 16
(HKU: University of Hong Kong),
João M. Santos2
Estimated H-index: 2
(ISCTE-IUL: ISCTE – University Institute of Lisbon)
ABSTRACTThe demands for academic research placed on contemporary universities are closely related to the levels of innovative research they are expected to produce. Concurrently, both governments and university management strive to make the production of academic research more cost-efficient and have implemented measures to ensure this. Top-down policies influenced by the concepts of new public management and managerialism have been introduced, pushing for competitiveness and increased performat...
View next paperAtypical Combinations and Scientific Impact