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Teaching lexical bundles in the disciplines: An example from a writing intensive history class

Published on Dec 1, 2006in Linguistics and Education 1.52
· DOI :10.1016/j.linged.2007.02.001
Viviana Cortes10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Iowa State University)
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Abstract
Abstract Researchers and instructors have been interested in the investigation and teaching of formulaic sequences for the past four decades. In academic writing, for example, these expressions are extremely frequent in the production of published authors in academic disciplines but rarely used by university students. The present study focused on the teaching of a special type of recurrent word combinations called lexical bundles to a group of university students in a writing-intensive history class. Pre- and post-instruction analyses were conducted on students’ class assignments in order to identify the use of these lexical bundles. In addition, alterative expressions used with functions similar to those of these bundles were analyzed in students’ final written production for the course. The findings of the study reflected no difference between pre- and post-instruction production of lexical bundles but they indicated an increase in students’ awareness of and interest in these expressions.
  • References (18)
  • Citations (72)
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References18
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2004in Applied Linguistics 3.04
Douglas Biber40
Estimated H-index: 40
,
Susan Conrad12
Estimated H-index: 12
(PSU: Portland State University),
Viviana Cortes10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Iowa State University)
This paper investigates the use of multi-word sequences in two important university registers: classroom teaching and textbooks. Following Biber et al. (1999), we take a frequency-driven approach to the identification of multi-word sequences, referred to as 'lexical bundles'. We compare the lexical bundles in classroom teaching and textbooks to those found in our previous research on conversation and academic prose. Structural patterns are described first, and then we present a functional taxono...
Published on Feb 26, 2004
Martha A. Jones2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Sandra Haywood2
Estimated H-index: 2
Published on Feb 26, 2004
Norbert Schmitt39
Estimated H-index: 39
,
Ronald Carter32
Estimated H-index: 32
Published on Jan 1, 2004in English for Specific Purposes 1.70
Viviana Cortes10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Iowa State University)
Abstract For more than a century, linguists have been interested in the study of frequent word combinations. The present study investigated a special type of word combination, lexical bundles, defined as a sequence of three or more words that co-occur frequently in a particular register [Longman Grammar of Spoken and Written English, Longman, London, 1999]. The goal was to improve the understanding of the function of lexical bundles in academic prose by comparing the use of such bundles by publi...
Published on Jan 1, 2003
Andrew Wilson15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Paul Rayson27
Estimated H-index: 27
,
A. M. McEnery5
Estimated H-index: 5
Geoffrey Leech is one of the pioneers of modern computer corpus linguistics. This Festschrift contains contributions from colleagues around the world who have been influenced, in various ways, by the approaches to language and text which Geoff pioneered. Many of the contributions focus (both synchronically and diachronically) on the English language, which has been Geoff's main interest throughout his career. However, work on Polish, French, Biblical Greek, and Creole studies is also reported, w...
Published on Jan 22, 2002in TESOL Quarterly 2.72
Eileen K. Blau2
Estimated H-index: 2
(RUM: University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez)
This volume contains papers by a number of teachers and theoreticians interested in the practical classroom implications of incorporating collocation into everyday classroom teaching. The book is designed to: provide a perspective on collocation; provide practical ways of introducing the idea to students; give examples of good classroom practice; describe teachers' experiences; give examples of good practice from teachers' own experience; show practical classroom activities; and help students ge...
Published on Jan 1, 2002in Journal of English for Academic Purposes 1.73
Ken Hyland58
Estimated H-index: 58
(CityU: City University of Hong Kong),
Liz Hamp-Lyons18
Estimated H-index: 18
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
Abstract The field of English for Academic Purposes has developed rapidly in the past 25 years to become a major force in English language teaching and research. Drawing its strength from broad theoretical foundations and a commitment to research-based language education, EAP has begun to reveal some of the constraints of social contexts on language use and to develop ways for learners to gain control over these. In this first issue of a new journal devoted to developments and understandings in ...
Published on Jan 1, 2002
Alison Wray18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Cardiff University)
Part I. What Formulaic Sequences Are: 1. The whole and the parts 2. Detecting formulaicity 3. Pinning down formulaicity Part II. A Reference Point: 4. Patterns of formulaicity in normal adult language 5. The function of formulaic sequences: a model Part III. Formulaic Sequences in First Language Acquisition: 6. Patterns of formulaicity in child language 7. Formulaic sequences in the first language acquisition Part IV. Formulaic Sequences in a Second Language: 8. Non-native language: overview 9. ...
Published on Jan 1, 2000in Third Text
Britt Erman1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Beatrice Warren9
Estimated H-index: 9
The assumptions forming the basis of this study are that the language user has available a number of more-or-less preconstructed phrases and that the production of texts involves alternation between word-for-word combinations—which we refer to as adherence to the open choice principle (after Sinclair 1991)—and preconstructed multi-word combinations, which we refer to as making use of the idiom principle (again after Sinclair). The main aim of the study is to gain an Impression ofthe impact that ...
Published on Jul 1, 1999in Journal of Pragmatics 1.33
Bruce Fraser15
Estimated H-index: 15
(BU: Boston University)
Abstract This paper is an attempt to clarify the status of discourse markers. These lexical expressions have been studied under various labels, including discourse markers, discourse connectives, discourse operators, pragmatic connectives, sentence connectives, and cue phrases. Although most researchers agree that they are expressions which relate discourse segments, there is no agreement on how they are to be defined or how they function. After reviewing prior theoretical research, I define dis...
Cited By72
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Second Language Writing 4.20
Sonca Vo (Iowa State University), Sonca Vo
Abstract Second language writing research has often analyzed written discourse to provide evidence on learner language development; however, single word-based analyses have been found to be insufficient in capturing learner language development (Read & Nation, 2006). This study therefore utilized both single word-based and multi-word analyses. Specifically, it explored vocabulary distributions and lexical bundles to better understand the development of writing proficiency across three levels in ...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in English for Specific Purposes 1.70
Heidi R. Wright (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)
Abstract Stand-alone literature reviews exist to synthesize the vast amount of data produced by modern academia, but to date, little research exists on this genre of written academic prose. The present study, therefore, investigates the frequency, dispersion, and discourse functions of lexical bundles in stand-alone literature reviews. A 3.4 million word corpus of 417 stand-alone literature reviews in psychology, education, and medicine was compiled, and four-word bundles occurring more than 40 ...
Yu Liu (BYU: Brigham Young University)
This chapter reviews discussion and findings in the research of second language speaking fluency and its relationship with formulaic language instruction. It examines the disfluent phenomenon in thirty-nine L2 Chinese academic oral presentations. There are eight types of disfluencies found in the data. It is suggested that training in common formulaic sequences in Chinese presentations can provide learners useful framing structures for their presentations. Knowing formulaic sequences can help th...
Published on Apr 1, 2018in English for Specific Purposes 1.70
Cassi L. Liardét3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Macquarie University)
Abstract This article investigates Chinese EFL learners' use of evaluation and stance in academic texts by exploring their deployment of interpersonal grammatical metaphors (IGM), a construct mapped within Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL; Halliday, 1985; e.g., I believe, it is evident , etc.). The data is drawn from the Chinese Longitudinal Learner Corpus (CLLC), a two-year diachronic study into university learners' development of academic literacy (Liardet, 2014a). When examining IGM, it i...
Published on Jan 1, 2018in International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 0.83
Ken Hyland58
Estimated H-index: 58
(UEA: University of East Anglia),
Feng (Kevin) Jiang6
Estimated H-index: 6
(JLU: Jilin University)
Abstract An important component of fluent linguistic production and a key distinguishing feature of particular modes, registers and genres is the multi-word expressions referred to as ‘lexical bundles’. These are extended collocations which appear more frequently than expected by chance, helping to shape meanings and contributing to our sense of coherence and distinctiveness in a text. These strings have been studied extensively, particularly in academic writing in English, but little is known a...
Published on Dec 31, 2017
Although the idea of collocation has been the core of the Firthian linguistic approach, only recently did language researchers and practitioners pay close attention to recurrent multi-word combinations or lexical bundles. Unlike the studies of roles of collocation in a language, the research of lexical bundles has shown that they are crucial building blocks of discourse and register in academic disciplines. Given the fact that the role of lexical bundles in the writings of academic community has...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Language Learning 2.00
Atsushi Mizumoto6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Kansai University),
Sawako Hamatani1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Kansai University),
Yasuhiro Imao1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Osaka University)
Published on Oct 1, 2017in System 1.93
Yu Kyoung Shin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(GSU: Georgia State University),
YouJin Kim16
Estimated H-index: 16
(GSU: Georgia State University)
Abstract The purpose of the study is to examine the potential for teaching articles using lexical bundles with adult English language learners of varying proficiency levels. Participants were low-intermediate and high-intermediate English as a second language students ( n = 107). Using a pretest/posttest/delayed posttest design, the learners were assigned to either the experimental group or the control group. The experimental treatment involved a consciousness-raising activity with explicit inst...
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Journal of English for Academic Purposes 1.73
Rajab Esfandiari2
Estimated H-index: 2
(IKIU: Imam Khomeini International University),
Fatima Barbary1
Estimated H-index: 1
(IKIU: Imam Khomeini International University)
Abstract Knowledge of lexical bundles helps develop fluent linguistic production, forms the building blocks of academic discourse, and establishes membership in disciplinary communities. Given the significance of these recurrent word combinations in academic research writing, direct comparison between native-English and non-native-English writers in use of these expressions in writing research articles (RAs) may offer important insights into how they are used structurally and functionally. Build...
Randy Fred Appel3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Concordia University),
Pavel Trofimovich23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Concordia University)
Formulaic sequences (FSs), or prefabricated multi-word structures (e.g. on the other hand), are often difficult to identify objectively, and current corpus-driven methods yield structurally incomplete, overlapping, or overly extended structures of questionable psychological validity and pedagogical usefulness. To address these limitations, this study evaluated transitional probability as a potential metric to improve the identification of FSs by presenting 100 four-word sequences from the Britis...