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The 2012 TRIP survey of international relations in Australia: one problem to rule us all

Published on Apr 1, 2013in Australian Journal of International Affairs1.17
· DOI :10.1080/10357718.2012.750643
Lee Morgenbesser1
Estimated H-index: 1
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Abstract
This article analyses the results of the most recent and largest cross-national survey on the international relations discipline. Completed by scholars in 20 countries, the survey covered the areas of teaching, research, foreign policy, the profession, and the relationship between policy and academia. From an Australian perspective, the key findings include the strong link between what academics teach and research; the narrowing epistemological gap between the USA and Australia; the curious pessimism of scholars on a wide range of foreign policy issues; and the ability of scholars to define research quality independently of other national settings. The most significant and alarming finding, however, concerned how the present structure of the field is undermining scholars'attempt to forge closer, more influential ties with policy makers in Canberra. In fact, it is clear from the results that what academics research and how they go about it is actually counterintuitive to this goal. The article concludes wi...
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Published on Jan 1, 2013in PS Political Science & Politics1.34
J. C. Sharman18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Griffith University),
Catherine Weaver7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Texas at Austin)
Efforts to systematize our knowledge of international relations (IR) have tended to focus on journal articles while ignoring books. In contrast, we argue that to know IR we must know IR books. To this end, this article presents the first systematic analysis of such books based on coding 500 IR texts published by leading presses against variables covering methodology, theoretical paradigm, and policy application. We compare the results with those of the Teaching, Research, and International Polic...
Published on Jun 1, 2011in International Studies Quarterly2.17
Daniel Maliniak8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego),
Amy Oakes5
Estimated H-index: 5
(W&M: College of William & Mary)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael J. Tierney15
Estimated H-index: 15
(W&M: College of William & Mary)
Using two new data sources to describe trends in the international relations (IR) discipline since 1980—a database of every article published in the 12 leading journals in the field and three surveys of IR faculty at US colleges and universities—we explore the extent of theoretical, methodological, and epistemological diversity in the American study of IR and the relationship between IR scholarship and the policy-making community in the United States. We find, first, that there is considerable a...
Published on Apr 1, 2011in Australian Journal of International Affairs1.17
J. C. Sharman18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Griffith University),
Jacqui True14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Auckland)
This article examines the results of the world's largest ever survey of international relations (IR) scholars with an eye to establishing the particularities of the discipline in Australia and New Zealand. The survey covered the areas of teaching, research, the structure of the profession and scholars’ views on foreign policy. From these results, this paper compares IR in New Zealand and Australia, and discusses the extent to which the discipline in these two countries is distinctive from its ov...
Published on Dec 1, 2009in Australian Journal of Political Science0.84
J. C. Sharman18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Griffith University),
Patrick Moray Weller19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Griffith University)
This article presents a comparison of research quality in political science among Australian universities. Two sources are used to assess the output of high-quality political science scholarship. The first looks at publication totals in leading journals, using the hierarchy of journal quality from the Excellence in Research Australia program. The second counts Australian Research Council Discovery Grants awarded in political science. Although there is no attempt to present an authoritative maste...
Published on Sep 1, 2009in Australian Journal of Politics and History0.41
Michael Wesley3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Lowy Institute for International Policy)
Australian International Relations (IR) developed as a discipline at the same time as its emergence in the rest of the Anglophone world. A deep reading of Australian writing on international relations since the 1920s reveals a distinctive tradition of IR scholarship, shaped very much by this country's international circumstances and the pragmatic culture of political inquiry that pervaded its universities and diplomatic institutions. Three characteristics frame the Australian Realist outlook. Th...
Published on Sep 1, 2009in Australian Journal of Politics and History0.41
Richard Devetak10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Disciplinary histories of Australian International Relations (IR) theory have tended to focus on the 1960s — when a number of Australian scholars returned from the UK to take up posts at the Australian National University’s Department of International Relations — as the beginning of a discipline that has subsequently flourished through various disciplinary debates and global events. This article offers a preliminary attempt at narrating a more complete history of Australian IR by beginning to re...
Published on Jan 1, 2009
R. A. W. Rhodes46
Estimated H-index: 46
(UTAS: University of Tasmania)
This book provides the first comprehensive reference work on the history of political studies in Australia. Because the academic study of politics in Australia is largely a post-war phenomenon, the contributors focus on developments since the 1939–45 war, although we also explore the historical roots of each major sub-field. One of our central concerns is the contribution of political science to the study of politics. However, because political studies encompass disciplines other than political ...
Published on Jan 1, 2009
R. A. W. Rhodes46
Estimated H-index: 46
The Australian Study of Politics is the first comprehensive reference work on the history of the study of politics in Australia. It focuses on developments since WW2, exploring the historical roots of each major subfield. We conclude that Australian political science is strong where it has a long-standing engagement with the international political science community (for example, in international relations); where it regularly interacts with Australian government priorities (for example, in publ...
Published on Mar 1, 2008in Politics & Gender0.78
Daniel Maliniak8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego),
Amy Oakes5
Estimated H-index: 5
(W&M: College of William & Mary)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael J. Tierney15
Estimated H-index: 15
(W&M: College of William & Mary)
Women now receive political science degrees in record numbers, but female representation among political science faculty still lags behind that of many other disciplines. Only 26% of the 13,000 political science professors in the United States today are women (Sedowski and Brintall 2007). According to our recent survey of international relations faculty in the United States—the 2006 Teaching, Research, and International Politics (TRIP) Survey—women comprise an even smaller proportion of IR schol...
Published on Jan 1, 2008
Kishore Mahbubani1
Estimated H-index: 1
For two centuries Asians have been bystanders in world history, reacting defenselessly to the surges of Western commerce, thought, and power. That era is over. Asia is returning to the center stage it occupied for eighteen centuries before the rise of the West. By 2050, three of the world's largest economies will be Asian: China, India, and Japan. In The New Asian Hemisphere, Kishore Mahbubani argues that Western minds need to step outside their "comfort zone" and prepare new mental maps to unde...
Cited By4
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Published on Apr 3, 2017in Journal of Political Science Education
Susan N Engel5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UOW: University of Wollongong),
Josh Pallas1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UOW: University of Wollongong),
Sarah R Lambert3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UOW: University of Wollongong)
ABSTRACTThis article demonstrates that the purposeful subject design, incorporating a Model United Nations (MUN), facilitated deep learning and professional skills attainment in the field of International Relations. Deep learning was promoted in subject design by linking learning objectives to Anderson and Krathwohl’s (2001) four levels of knowledge or cognition: factual, conceptual, procedural, and metacognitive. Students demonstrated improvement in all four areas; however, this article focuses...
Published on Jul 31, 2016in International Studies Review2.08
Ido Oren9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UF: University of Florida)
In recent years the centrality of grand, paradigmatic theory in American IR has eroded, with the vacuum being filled by largely atheoretical “hypothesis-testing” research. Although a heated debate has emerged on whether it is good or bad for IR, hardly anyone has tried to analyze this trend. I offer an analysis grounded in a conceptual framework elaborated by sociologist Richard Whitley. In the 1980s and 1990s IR approximated the type of social organization Whitley labeled “polycentric oligarchy...
Published on Jul 2, 2016in Australian Journal of Political Science0.84
Susan N Engel5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UOW: University of Wollongong)
ABSTRACTFor decades, politics and international relations (PaIR) programs across Australia have taken a smorgasbord or student consumption approach to curriculum development. This article examines whether, with the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF), there has been a systematisation and transformation of curriculum. It surveys 21 programs and majors in the field offered at 10 universities. It analyses directions in program structure, content and to a lesser extent delivery in order to dis...
Published on Sep 1, 2014in Australian Journal of Public Administration1.31
Ian Hall40
Estimated H-index: 40
(ANU: Australian National University)
Australian International Relations (IR) was once a hybrid of American and European styles of political science, but today it is dominated by a British-inspired post-positivism which has its virtues – and its vices – and which utilises various interpretive and semi-interpretive approaches. This paper welcomes the ‘interpretive turn’ in Australian IR, but recognises its weaknesses, and argues that, to overcome them, interpretivists must be clear about what interpretivism should and should not enta...