Match!

A possible instance of sexual dimorphism in the tails of two oviraptorosaur dinosaurs

Published on Aug 1, 2015in Scientific Reports4.01
· DOI :10.1038/srep09472
W. Scott Persons14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Gregory F. Funston8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 1 AuthorsMark A. Norell60
Estimated H-index: 60
Abstract
As in all major vertebrate groups, dinosaurs must have included many species with gross anatomical traits that were sexually dimorphic. However, the identification of sexual dimorphism in dinosaurs is hindered by the limitations of an ancient fossil record, which restricts comparative sample size, degrades the quality of available specimens, and usually precludes the observation of non-osteological features. Among non-avian theropod dinosaurs, previous attempts to recognize sexual dimorphism have been controversial and inconclusive. Here we describe a possible instance of sexual dimorphism based on chevron morphology in the oviraptorosaur Khaan mckennai. Two specimens of Khaan mckennai (Paleontological Center of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences MPC-D 100/1002 and MPC-D 100/1127) were excavated from the same Upper Cretaceous locality in the Djadokhta Formation (Ukhaa Tolgod, Gurvan Tes Somon, Omnogov Aimak, Gobi Desert, Mongolia), and were found in close proximity to each other (approximately 20 cm away) and in the same bedding plane1. Geological work at Ukhaa Tolgod indicates that the preserved animals were buried alive by catastrophic dune collapses, precipitated by heavy rains2,3. MPC-D 100/1002 and MPC-D 100/1127 were likely killed by a single collapse event and appear to have been near each other prior to death. The two specimens were collectively given the informal, but perhaps fortuitous, nicknames of “Romeo and Juliet” or, occasionally, “Sid and Nancy”. MPC-D 100/1002 is slightly larger than MPC-D 100/1127 (femur lengths of 195 mm and 190 mm, respectively). MPC-D 100/1127 – the holotype of Khaan mckennai1 – is a complete skeleton. MPC-D 100/1002 is a nearly complete skeleton, missing only the middle and posterior portions of the tail. It nevertheless displays all diagnostic characteristics of Khaan mckennai, including a proximally narrow metacarpal III that does not contact the distal carpals (for a full description of both specimens and their taxonomic assignment see Clark et al.1 and Balanoff and Norell4). In both individuals, all vertebral neural arches and centra are fully fused, indicating that both had reached adulthood before death5,6, although histological evidence is still wanting. Based on the similarities in size and proportions, both individuals also appear to have reached roughly the same level of maturity. However, the chevrons of MPC-D 100/1002 and MPC-D 100/1127 show a striking disparity in morphology.
  • References (19)
  • Citations (8)
References19
Newest
#1Michael Pittman (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 11
#2Stephen M. Gatesy (Brown University)H-Index: 28
Last.John Hutchinson (RVC: Royal Veterinary College)H-Index: 36
view all 5 authors...
12 CitationsSource
#1W. Scott Persons (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 14
#2Philip J. Currie (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 52
Last.Mark A. Norell (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 60
view all 3 authors...
28 CitationsSource
59 CitationsSource
#1W. Scott Persons (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 14
#2Philip J. Currie (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 52
33 CitationsSource
#1Randall B. Irmis (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 23
145 CitationsSource
#1Gregory M. Erickson (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 33
#2A. Kristopher Lappin (NAU: Northern Arizona University)H-Index: 16
Last.Peter Larson (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
16 CitationsSource
#1Tamaki SatoH-Index: 12
#2Yen-Nien ChengH-Index: 11
Last.Yu-fu HsiaoH-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
87 CitationsSource
#1Peter LarsonH-Index: 1
#2Kristin DonnanH-Index: 1
8 Citations
#1James M. Clark (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 38
#2Mark A. Norell (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 60
Last.Rinchen Barsbold (Mongolian Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 16
view all 3 authors...
67 CitationsSource
#1David B. LoopeH-Index: 29
#2Joseph A. MasonH-Index: 33
Last.Lowell DingusH-Index: 12
view all 3 authors...
45 CitationsSource
Cited By8
Newest
#1W. Scott Persons (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 14
#2Philip J. Currie (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 52
Source
#1Walter S. Persons (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 2
#2Philip J. Currie (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 52
Source
#1Mark A. Norell (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 60
#2Amy M. Balanoff (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 4
Last.Gregory M. Erickson (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 33
view all 4 authors...
5 CitationsSource
11 CitationsSource
#1MartinGLockleyH-Index: 41
#2Richard T. McCreaH-Index: 12
Last.Glade HaddenH-Index: 2
view all 15 authors...
17 CitationsSource
#1David W. E. Hone (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 23
Source
#2Federico L. AgnolinH-Index: 18
Last.Marcelo P. IsasiH-Index: 6
view all 7 authors...
16 CitationsSource
Source