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Globalisation, academic capitalism, and the uneven geographies of international journal publishing spaces
Abstract
Geographers have been arguing recently that the idea of what is 'international' in this field has been occupied by the hegemonic discourses of Anglo-American geography and journals. This paper takes this lively debate as an indicator of the global challenges facing higher education and research and provides an analysis of the changing conditions of knowledge production, characterised by internationalisation and competition. Knowledge production is governed to an increasing degree through practices based on market-like operations. The author argues that this may lead to the homogenisation of social science publication practices, which are known to be heterogeneous and context dependent. One indicator of this homogenisation is the demand for publishing in international journals that is arising in social sciences and humanities round the world. Both 'international' and 'quality' are increasingly being connected with the journals noted in the Institute of Scientific Information's (ISI) databases. Starting with an analysis of the changing conditions of knowledge production in general and in human geography in particular, the author scrutinises the spatial patterns of the international journal publishing spaces constituted by the ISI. The results show specific geographies: not only the manner in which the Anglo-American journals dominate the publishing space in science but also how the publishing spaces of the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities are very different. The publication space of social science journals is particularly limited to the English-speaking countries, and this is especially the case with human geography.
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Ulrich Beck66
Estimated H-index: 66
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Estimated H-index: 12
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During recent years universities have engagedincreasingly in academic capitalism as aresponse to the decrease in budget funding andthe external push towards entrepreneurialactivities. This paper explores on the microlevel what impacts the changing fundingpatterns have on university research, how thechanges are responded to in different researchunits, and how researchers experience them.Based on focused interviews with seniorresearchers in three different types ofresearch settings in Finland, the...
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Robert K. Merton56
Estimated H-index: 56
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Steve Fuller23
Estimated H-index: 23
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Mathieu Albert2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Université du Québec à Montréal)
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Michael Gibbons10
Estimated H-index: 10
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Camille Limoges9
Estimated H-index: 9
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Helga Nowotny21
Estimated H-index: 21
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Mary Henkel19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Brunel University London)
The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), first established by the UK University Grants Committee in 1985 has been an important instrument in the modernisation of higher education in the UK. It is a means of rationalising the stratification of universities and the concentration of research resources, and of maximising research output. At the same time, while its operation remains substantially under professional control, it has had profound implications for the academic profession. The article exp...
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Robert Phillipson23
Estimated H-index: 23
English-Only Europe? explores the role of languages in the process of European integration. Languages are central to the development of an integrated Europe. The way in which the European Union deals with multilingualism has serious implications for both individual member countries and international relations. In this book, Robert Phillipson considers whether the contemporary expansion of English represents a serious threat to other European languages. After exploring the implications of current...
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Sheila Slaughter10
Estimated H-index: 10
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Larry Leslie2
Estimated H-index: 2
The globalization of the political economy at the end of the twentieth century is destabilizing the patterns of university professional work developed over the past hundred years. One of the major changes that has taken place as a result of globalization is that faculty, who were previously situated between capital and labor, are now positioned squarely in the marketplace. To grasp the extent of changes taking place and to understand the forces of change, Academic Capitalism examines the current...
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Roger King1
Estimated H-index: 1
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A. Aylett (University of British Columbia), Trevor J. Barnes32
Estimated H-index: 32
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Luísa Oliveira3
Estimated H-index: 3
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Helena Carvalho7
Estimated H-index: 7
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P. Claval1
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Maria Dolors Garcia Ramon7
Estimated H-index: 7
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Janice Monk20
Estimated H-index: 20
In introducing this theme issue on international directions in gender studies in geography, we take up three cross-cutting issues. First, we examine the importance of context in shaping where, why, how and by whom gender research is carried out, noting the importance of the representation of women in the profession, the place of geography within the social sciences, and the implications of political and economic contexts. Second, we review theoretical and methodological directions and empirical ...
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Nicolai Scherle4
Estimated H-index: 4
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Hans Hopfinger2
Estimated H-index: 2
Abstract This chapter aims to familiarize the reader with some of the important aspects of tourism geography in the German-speaking countries. It starts with a primarily historical-genetic perspective on tourism development and the theoretical traditions associated with them. The second section describes the structure of the discipline, with a focus on the institutionalization of the field in the universities including their research specialization. The chapter maintains that tourism geography p...
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Enes Gök1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University),
John C. Weidman12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Pittsburgh)
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Harald Bauder10
Estimated H-index: 10
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Bernd Belina4
Estimated H-index: 4
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David Butz11
Estimated H-index: 11
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Helen Peterson3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Gothenburg)
ABSTRACTThis article highlights the multifaceted character of the Swedish higher education sector and investigates senior academic management positions from a gender perspective using theories about an academic prestige economy and academic capitalism. The focus is on an aspect often overseen in research on Swedish academia: the distinction between universities and university colleges. The analysis draws on interviews with 22 women in senior management positions in Swedish higher education and a...
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Transnational Higher Education Networks for Learning and Teaching (TNLTs) in Geography are networks of academic geographers that facilitate a common interest in exchanging knowledge about higher education learning and teaching. Participation within these learning and teaching networks arguably provides benefits of information sharing but is often compromised by barriers such as finance and time. The aim of this study is to contribute to geographies of higher education by exploring academic netwo...
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