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Abdominal Adiposity and Mortality in Chinese Women

Published on May 14, 2007in JAMA Internal Medicine20.77
· DOI :10.1001/archinte.167.9.886
Xianglan Zhang25
Estimated H-index: 25
,
Xiao-Ou Shu96
Estimated H-index: 96
+ 4 AuthorsWei Zheng110
Estimated H-index: 110
Cite
Abstract
Background Increased abdominal adiposity has been linked to an increase in mortality in populations where many are overweight or obese; it is unclear whether the same is true in relatively lean populations. Methods We examined the association between waist-hip ratio and mortality in the Shanghai Women's Health Study, a population-based, prospective cohort study of Chinese women aged 40 to 70 years enrolled from December 28, 1996, through May 23, 2000, 95% of whom had a body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of less than 30.0. Included in this analysis were 72 773 nonsmoking women who had anthropometrics taken by trained interviewers at enrollment and who were followed up through December 31, 2004. Deaths were ascertained by biennial home visits and linkage with the vital statistics registry. Results During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 1456 deaths occurred. The waist-hip ratio was positively and significantly associated with deaths from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes ( P Conclusion Abdominal adiposity independently predicts mortality risk, particularly for nonobese women.
  • References (26)
  • Citations (93)
Cite
References26
Newest
Published on May 1, 2007in British Journal of Nutrition3.32
Raquel Villegas21
Estimated H-index: 21
(VUMC: Vanderbilt University Medical Center),
Gong Yang53
Estimated H-index: 53
(VUMC: Vanderbilt University Medical Center)
+ 4 AuthorsXiao-Ou Shu96
Estimated H-index: 96
(VUMC: Vanderbilt University Medical Center)
We evaluated the validity and reproducibility of the FFQ used in the Shanghai Men’s Health Study (SMHS). The study included 195 randomly selected participants of the SMHS who completed one FFQ at baseline, twelve 24-hour dietary recalls (24-HDR) (once a month for twelve consecutive months) and a second FFQ at the end of the study. The FFQ accounted for 88·78 % of the foods recorded in the 24-HDR surveys. The validity of the FFQ was evaluated by comparing nutrient and food group intake levels fro...
Published on Aug 24, 2006in The New England Journal of Medicine70.67
Sun Ha Jee51
Estimated H-index: 51
(Yonsei University),
Jae Woong Sull22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Johns Hopkins University)
+ 4 AuthorsJonathan M. Samet104
Estimated H-index: 104
(Johns Hopkins University)
Background Obesity is associated with diverse health risks, but the role of body weight as a risk factor for death remains controversial. Methods We examined the association between body weight and the risk of death in a 12-year prospective cohort study of 1,213,829 Koreans between the ages of 30 and 95 years. We examined 82,372 deaths from any cause and 48,731 deaths from specific diseases (including 29,123 from cancer, 16,426 from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and 3362 from respirato...
Published on Aug 24, 2006in The New England Journal of Medicine70.67
Kenneth F. Adams12
Estimated H-index: 12
(NIH: National Institutes of Health),
Arthur Schatzkin98
Estimated H-index: 98
+ 5 AuthorsMichael F. Leitzmann78
Estimated H-index: 78
Background Obesity, defined by a body-mass index (BMI) (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) of 30.0 or more, is associated with an increased risk of death, but the relation between overweight (a BMI of 25.0 to 29.9) and the risk of death has been questioned. Methods We prospectively examined BMI in relation to the risk of death from any cause in 527,265 U.S. men and women in the National Institutes of Health–AARP cohort who were 50 to 71 years old at enrollment...
Published on Feb 15, 2006in JAMA51.27
Dongfeng Gu63
Estimated H-index: 63
,
Jiang He99
Estimated H-index: 99
(Tulane University)
+ 6 AuthorsPaul K. Whelton95
Estimated H-index: 95
ContextThe effect of underweight and obesity on mortality has not been well characterized in Asian populations.ObjectiveTo examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and mortality in Chinese adults.Design, Setting, and ParticipantsA prospective cohort study in a nationally representative sample of 169 871 Chinese men and women aged 40 years or older. Data on body weight and covariables were obtained at a baseline examination in 1991 using a standard protocol. Follow-up evaluation was...
Published on Dec 1, 2005in American Journal of Epidemiology4.47
Wei Zheng110
Estimated H-index: 110
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University),
Wong Ho Chow77
Estimated H-index: 77
+ 9 AuthorsQi Li10
Estimated H-index: 10
Although cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in most nations, the spectrum of cancer occurrence varies substantially worldwide. Most previous epidemiologic studies investigating cancer etiology were conducted in North American and western European countries that are relatively homogenous in terms of cancer spectrums and many lifestyle exposures. These limitations may have hindered these studies from evaluating some important etiologic hypotheses. From 1996 to 2000, the Shanghai Wo...
Published on Nov 1, 2005in The Lancet59.10
Salim Yusuf Mb Bs DPhil Frcpc209
Estimated H-index: 209
(Population Health Research Institute),
Steven Hawken4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Population Health Research Institute)
+ 12 AuthorsLiu Lisheng21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Cardiovascular Institute of the South)
Summary Background Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but the most predictive measure for different ethnic populations is not clear. We aimed to assess whether markers of obesity, especially waist-to-hip ratio, would be stronger indicators of myocardial infarction than body-mass index (BMI), the conventional measure. Methods We did a standardised case-control study of acute myocardial infarction with 27 098 participants in 52 countries (12 461 cases and 14 637 controls) r...
Published on Aug 3, 2005in JAMA51.27
Barry M. Popkin319
Estimated H-index: 319
(Harvard University),
Frank B. Hu202
Estimated H-index: 202
(Harvard University)
+ 1 AuthorsJoAnn E. Manson231
Estimated H-index: 231
(Harvard University)
In their study of deaths associated with underweight, overweight, and obesity, Dr Flegal and colleagues1 conclude that excess mortality due to obesity and overweight is much lower than previously reported. We believe that their analysis is flawed and misleading. A major challenge in such studies is that low weight is often due to underlying chronic disease, which may exist for many years before death. Thus, lean persons are a mix of smokers, healthy active persons, and those with chronic illness...
Published on May 13, 2005in Circulation Research15.86
Anders H Berg A H31
Estimated H-index: 31
(Yeshiva University),
Philipp E. Scherer111
Estimated H-index: 111
Mounting evidence highlights the role of adipose tissue in the development of a systemic inflammatory state that contributes to obesity-associated vasculopathy and cardiovascular risk. Circulating mediators of inflammation participate in the mechanisms of vascular insult and atheromatous change, and many of these inflammatory proteins are secreted directly from adipocytes and adipose tissue–derived macrophages. Several factors linking obesity with an increased cardiovascular risk have been ident...
Published on Dec 23, 2004in The New England Journal of Medicine70.67
Frank B. Hu202
Estimated H-index: 202
,
Barry M. Popkin319
Estimated H-index: 319
+ 3 AuthorsJoAnn E. Manson231
Estimated H-index: 231
Background Whether higher levels of physical activity can counteract the elevated risk of death associated with adiposity is controversial. Methods We examined the associations of the body-mass index and physical activity with death among 116,564 women who, in 1976, were 30 to 55 years of age and free of known cardiovascular disease and cancer. Results During 24 years of follow-up, 10,282 deaths occurred — 2370 from cardiovascular disease, 5223 from cancer, and 2689 from other causes. Mortality ...
Cited By93
Newest
Chen Die Yang (SJTU: Shanghai Jiao Tong University), Ying Shen7
Estimated H-index: 7
(SJTU: Shanghai Jiao Tong University)
+ -3 AuthorsXiao Qun Wang7
Estimated H-index: 7
(SJTU: Shanghai Jiao Tong University)
Background Adverse cardiac remodeling after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a major cause for poor cardiovascular outcomes such as heart failure. The predisposing factors and underlying mechanisms remain not fully understood. This study investigates the association of insulin resistance and dysglycemia with left ventricular (LV) remodeling after STEMI in non-diabetic patients.
Published on Jul 16, 2019in Nutrients4.17
Yingying Wang , Yonggen Jiang1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 7 AuthorsGenming Zhao15
Estimated H-index: 15
Objective: Obesity and homocysteine (Hcy) are two important risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, evidence on the association between obesity and Hcy concentration was conflicting. The aim of our study is to explore the associations of general and central obesity with hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) in middle-aged women. Methods: The current analysis was based on data from 11,007 women aged 40–60 years. Height, weight, and waist circumference (WC) were measured and serum homocystei...
Published on Jan 10, 2019in Journal of Clinical Medicine
Yang-Hyun Kim4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Seon Mee Kim24
Estimated H-index: 24
+ 7 AuthorsSoon Jib Yoo16
Estimated H-index: 16
Background: Waist circumference (WC) is an index of abdominal obesity and associated with co-morbidities and mortality. Higher WC is positively associated with increased mortality; therefore, we examined the relationship between WC and mortality in Korean populations with the interaction of body mass index (BMI) and WC for mortality. Methods: A total of 23,263,878 subjects (men = 11,813,850 and women = 11,450,028) who were older than 20 years and underwent the National Health Insurance Service h...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Scientific Reports4.01
Minlu Zhang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Fudan University),
Hui Cai46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
+ 4 AuthorsYing Zheng39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Fudan University)
Obesity has been well studied in relation to breast cancer survival. However, the associations of post-diagnosis obesity and late outcomes (≥5 years after diagnosis) have been much less studied. A total of 4062 5-year disease-free patients were recruited from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study, a longitudinal study of patients diagnosed during 2002-2006. Cox proportional hazard model with restricted cubic spline were used to evaluate the potential non-linear associations of post-diagnosis...
Published on Jul 31, 2017in PLOS ONE2.78
Janet Grant16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Catherine R. Chittleborough21
Estimated H-index: 21
+ 1 AuthorsAnne W. Taylor47
Estimated H-index: 47
Published on May 1, 2017in Nutrition Research2.63
Farzaneh Rezagholizadeh4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Tehran University of Medical Sciences),
Kurosh Djafarian12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Tehran University of Medical Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsSakineh Shab-Bidar14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Tehran University of Medical Sciences)
Abstract Central obesity is a pivotal component of metabolic syndrome, and several studies have investigated the association of dietary patterns and central obesity. However, findings of studies are inconclusive. Therefore, we aimed to conduct the present study to summarize the available data regarding the association of a posteriori dietary patterns and central obesity in adults to test the hypothesis of whether a highly healthy dietary pattern is associated with decreased risk of central obesi...
Published on Oct 6, 2016in PeerJ2.35
Nassib Bezerra Bueno4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UFAL: Federal University of Alagoas),
Telma Maria de Menezes Toledo Florêncio16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UFAL: Federal University of Alagoas)
+ 3 AuthorsAna Lydia Sawaya28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UNIFESP: Federal University of São Paulo)
Published on Oct 1, 2016in International Journal of Cancer4.98
Ying Liu7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University),
Shaneda Warren Andersen7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
+ 8 AuthorsXiao-Ou Shu96
Estimated H-index: 96
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
Abstract General obesity, typically measured using body mass index (BMI), has been associated with an increased risk of several cancers. However, few prospective studies have been conducted in Asian populations. Although central obesity, often measured using waist-hip ratio (WHR), is more predictive for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk than BMI, knowledge of its association with cancer incidence is limited. In a cohort of 68, 253 eligible Chinese women, we prospectively inv...
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Medicine1.87
Hao Sun1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Xiaoxia Ren1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 5 AuthorsXinchun Yang15
Estimated H-index: 15
Obesity is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and coronary artery disease; however, the relation between body mass index (BMI) and the risk of all-cause mortality is controversial. We prospectively examined the relationship between BMI and all-cause mortality in 123,384 Chinese men and women who participated in the Kailuan health examination study from 2006 to 2007 and 2008 to 2009. Cases included 6218 deaths (5770 men and 448 women) that occurred during a mean...
Published on Jul 22, 2016in Global journal for research analysis
Arup Gayen (Visva-Bharati University), SagarikaBandyopadhyay (Visva-Bharati University)
The present study assessed the status and relationship between gross efficiency and morphologic parameters of obese mid age men residing in West Bengal, India. A total of 44 mid age obese men of sedentary habits i.e. lifestyle habits without any structured physical activities, aged 35-55 years participated in this study. Height, weight, waist circumference, body surface area,and lean body mass were selected as morphologic parameters. All the morphologic parameters weremeasured by using standardi...