A predictive model of the density of airborne insects in agricultural environments

Published on Jan 1, 2008in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 3.54
· DOI :10.1016/j.agee.2007.05.001
Martin U. Grüebler4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Zurich),
Muriel Morand1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Swiss Ornithological Institute),
Beat Naef-Daenzer21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Swiss Ornithological Institute)
Abstract
This paper presents a model to predict the daily spatio-temporal variation in the abundance of airborne insects in agricultural landscapes on the basis of publicly available environmental data. Data on the abundance of insects flying near ground level were collected by a robust and effective point-count method. The validation of the model using extra data revealed a high correspondence between predicted and observed insect density. The final model showed that the abundance of airborne insects depended largely on the daily weather conditions. Agricultural habitats differed in the abundance of airborne insects, with peak insect numbers found along hedgerows and trees. This accumulation pattern was most pronounced at low temperatures and in windy conditions. Efforts to enhance insect abundance in agricultural landscapes therefore need to increase the number of structural elements such as hedgerows, single trees and orchards. This study highlights how weather conditions and agricultural land-use affect aerial food webs in agri-environments, including the dynamics of food patches for all kinds of aerial foragers.
  • References (30)
  • Citations (59)
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References30
Jason W. Osborne29
Estimated H-index: 29
73 Citations
Published on Nov 1, 2001in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Bo Söderström15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Birgitta Svensson6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 1 AuthorsAnders Glimskär8
Estimated H-index: 8
The preservation of remaining semi-natural grasslands in Europe has a high conservation priority. Previously, the effects of artificial fertilisation and grazing intensity on grassland animal and plant taxa have been extensively investigated. In contrast, little is known of the effects of tree and shrub cover within semi-natural grasslands and composition of habitats in the surrounding landscape on grassland taxa. We evaluated the effect that each of these factors has on species richness and com...
256 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2005in Journal of Applied Ecology 5.74
Oliver Schweiger35
Estimated H-index: 35
,
Jean-Pierre Maelfait26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Ghent University)
+ 16 AuthorsDebra Bailey17
Estimated H-index: 17
1. In landscapes influenced by anthropogenic activities, such as intensive agriculture, knowledge of the relative importance and interaction of environmental factors on the composition and function of local communities across a range of spatial scales is important for maintaining biodiversity. 2. We analysed five arthropod taxa covering a broad range of functional aspects (wild bees, true bugs, carabid beetles, hoverflies and spiders) in 24 landscapes (4 x 4 km) across seven European countries a...
217 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 28, 2008in Ibis 2.23
Bent Otto Poulsen7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Copenhagen)
The frequency of mixed-species flocks of birds, weather and insect activity were studied in a high-altitude cloud forest in Ecuador. It is generally accepted that participation in mixed-species flocks improves foraging efficiency. If this is true, more flock activity may be expected when food is less available, which may happen during long-lasting periods of rain and otherwise adverse weather conditions. The total number and mean size of flying insects decreased as rainfall increased. The number...
24 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2001in Journal of Applied Ecology 5.74
Anders Pape Møller87
Estimated H-index: 87
(Pierre-and-Marie-Curie University)
Summary 1. Recent changes in agricultural practice have been hypothesized to affect the abundance and reproductive success of farmland birds. The influence of dairy farming on barn swallows Hirundo rustica was investigated by comparison of their abundance, phenotype and reproduction on the same farms before and immediately after dairy farming ceased, while a control sample of farms without change in farming practice in the same years was used to check for temporal changes unrelated to farming pr...
82 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2003in Journal of Wildlife Management 2.06
Kenneth P. Burnham52
Estimated H-index: 52
,
David R. Anderson48
Estimated H-index: 48
The second edition of this book is unique in that it focuses on methods for making formal statistical inference from all the models in an a priori set (Multi-Model Inference). A philosophy is presented for model-based data analysis and a general strategy outlined for the analysis of empirical data. The book invites increased attention on a priori science hypotheses and modeling. Kullback-Leibler Information represents a fundamental quantity in science and is Hirotugu Akaike's basis for model sel...
24.1k Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1999in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 3.54
Peter Duelli27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research),
Martin K. Obrist20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research),
Dirk R. Schmatz10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research)
In agriculture, sustainability can be linked to ecological resilience. In view of present or imminent environmental changes in agricultural landscapes, the diversity of species and genotypes, particularly of potential beneficials and alternative prey, may become of increasing importance. However, the available methods and empirical data concerning species diversity of above-ground insects in agricultural landscapes do not yet allow comprehensive evaluation. Standardized inventory methods must be...
245 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2003in Basic and Applied Ecology 2.14
Peter Duelli27
Estimated H-index: 27
,
Martin K. Obrist20
Estimated H-index: 20
Abstract An important goal of ecological compensation measures in agricultural areas is the conservation and enhancement of regional species diversity. However, some current European agri-environment schemes seem to be rather ineffective. A likely explanation is the lack of source populations in intensely cultivated landscapes. Remnants of natural and seminatural habitats can contribute to regional biodiversity in various ways: as essential habitats for specialised species, as stepping stones, a...
253 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 1998in Journal of Applied Ecology 5.74
G. Siriwardena25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Oxford),
Stephen R. Baillie33
Estimated H-index: 33
(British Trust for Ornithology)
+ 3 AuthorsJeremy D. Wilson36
Estimated H-index: 36
(University of Oxford)
1. Widespread declines in the populations of many British farmland birds have occurred since the early 1970s. We must understand the causes of these declines tomake recommendations about conservation and agricultural management, andthis can be approached by investigating the relationships, across species, betweenabundance and agricultural change. We describe novel, quantitative approaches to the interpretation of abundance indices from which reliable inferences about conservation status can be m...
383 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2000in Journal of Environmental Management 4.00
M.J. Maudsley1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Bristol)
This paper reviews the available information on the ecology and conservation status of invertebrates, other than butterflies, in British hedgerows. The main habitat factors of hedges that influence invertebrate diversity and abundance are identified and discussed: botanical composition, structural diversity and shelter. Landscape structure is also shown to be critical. Examination of current management issues reveals that responses of invertebrate communities to hedge cutting in particular are c...
70 Citations Source Cite
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  • Citations (59)
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Cited By59
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Ornithology 1.95
Susanne Arbeiter3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Greifswald),
Martin Schulze2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 1 AuthorsSteffen Hahn19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Swiss Ornithological Institute)
Aerial insectivorous birds depend highly on favourable weather conditions for successful foraging because flight activity of insects is constrained by daily weather. Thus, the variation in weather conditions during reproduction, mediated by prey limitations, should be mirrored in annual reproduction performance, and finally in annual breeding success. We analysed the effect of local weather conditions on the availability of airborne insects and on the variation in brood size and nestling conditi...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2010in Journal of Applied Ecology 5.74
Martin U. Grüebler11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Swiss Ornithological Institute),
Fränzi Korner-Nievergelt16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Swiss Ornithological Institute),
Johann von Hirschheydt3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Swiss Ornithological Institute)
Summary 1. In many parts of the world, changes in agricultural land-use have led to significant declines of bird species, including aerial insectivores such as barn swallows. In particular, barn swallow populations have been declining across Europe where mixed and livestock farming have been replaced by arable farming. 2. A positive association between livestock farming and barn swallow reproductive success is well documented but the specific roles of micro- and macroenvironment, which are not m...
35 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2013in Canadian Journal of Zoology 1.18
Gabriel Pigeon4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Renaud Baeta5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 2 AuthorsFanie Pelletier28
Estimated H-index: 28
Lower immune response usually translates into lower fitness. Environmental quality can play a key role in shaping immune responses in the wild, as it influences both resource availability and costly maintenance functions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of habitat quality on proinflammatory response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor (Vieillot, 1808)) under contrasting agricultural practices. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that lower quality...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Journal of Field Ornithology 1.39
Ivan Maggini10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna),
Fadwa Hama2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 3 AuthorsGabriel Gargallo5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Catalan Ornithological Institute)
Investigators studying the stopover ecology of migrating birds typically use the capture–recapture method to examine important parameters such as fuel deposition rates (FDR) and stopover duration. However, such studies can be constrained by the number of recaptures. An alternative method is to calculate a regression of mass over time of day, but this method may not be reliable because patterns of mass change of individual birds through the day may not reflect that of the whole population. Given ...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2014in Ardeola
Susanne Arbeiter3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Greifswald),
Hannah Schnepel1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 3 AuthorsSteffen Hahn19
Estimated H-index: 19
Summary. European bee-eaters Merops apiaster forage almost exclusively on airborne insects caught on the wing. The availability of this food might be temporally limited due to adverse weather conditions, especially at climatically sub-optimal breeding sites. We determined seasonal variation in the diet composition in adult and nestling bee-eaters at the species' northernmost breeding colonies by analysing food remains from pellets and by direct observation. Adult bee-eaters preyed on a wide rang...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Ibis 2.23
Jael Hoffmann1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Zurich),
Erik Postma18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Zurich),
Michael Schaub38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Swiss Ornithological Institute)
Double brooding may be a good strategy for short-lived species to maximize annual and lifetime reproductive success (ARS and LRS, respectively). Nevertheless, there is typically individual variation in the probability of producing a second clutch. Here we evaluate factors that influence the decision to double brood in the Eurasian Hoopoe Upupa epops. Analyses of an 11-year dataset showed that 36% of the females and 21% of the males produced a second clutch after successfully raising a first clut...
18 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2013in Bird Study 1.12
Grzegorz Orłowski10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Polish Academy of Sciences),
Jerzy Karg9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Polish Academy of Sciences)
Capsule We found significant differences in the composition and diversity of diet among House Martins, Barn Swallows and Swifts breeding in the same village in Poland.Aims To evaluate the character and extent of diversity, specialization and overlap of diet between trophically similar nestlings of three species of aerial feeding birds breeding at the same location and differing considerably in foraging height.Methods Diet was determined based on faecal analysis. Differences in composition and di...
18 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2010in Oecologia 3.13
Sari Raja-aho3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Turku),
Petri Suorsa10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Turku)
+ 3 AuthorsTapio Eeva31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of Turku)
Migration is an energy-demanding life-history period and also a significant population-limiting factor of long-distance migratory birds. It is important to understand how corticosterone, the main energy regulating hormone in birds, is associated with behavioural and physiological changes during migration. According to the migration modulation hypothesis (MMH), individual birds may express elevated levels of baseline corticosterone to facilitate fuelling, but down-regulate the adrenocortical resp...
13 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2012in Ringing and Migration
Judith Morales Fernaz1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Spanish National Research Council),
Luc Schifferli6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Swiss Ornithological Institute),
Martin U. Grüebler11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Swiss Ornithological Institute)
Ageing is a crucial requisite for any analysis of growth and development. However, ageing by regular nest visits around hatching is time-consuming. Thus, species-specific developmental patterns are used to estimate nestling age at infrequent nest visits during the nestling period. Unfortunately, comprehensive species-specific data on the timing of other developmental traits than body mass and feather growth are rarely published. Here, we present an illustrated guide to ageing nestling Barn Swall...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2009in Journal of Animal Ecology 4.46
Michael Schaub38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Bern),
Johann von Hirschheydt3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Swiss Ornithological Institute)
Summary 1 Theoretical models predict a negative effect of current reproduction on breeding dispersal, survival and future reproduction, and many studies confirm these predictions. Yet, results of most previous studies may be difficult to interpret because the fate of the affected individuals cannot always be observed. Detection is almost always imperfect and some individuals emigrate from the study area, resulting in biased estimates of both survival and dispersal. 2 Most studies bypass these pr...
49 Citations Source Cite