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Overall and Central Obesity and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in U.S. Black Women

Published on Jul 1, 2007in Obesity 3.97
· DOI :10.1038/oby.2007.220
Supriya Krishnan13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Lynn Rosenberg82
Estimated H-index: 82
+ 2 AuthorsJulie R. Palmer58
Estimated H-index: 58
Cite
Abstract
Objective: Obesity has risen to epidemic proportions in the United States, leading to an emerging epidemic of type 2 diabetes. African-American women are disproportionately affected by both conditions. While an association of overall obesity with increasing risk of diabetes has been documented in black women, the effect of fat distribution, specifically abdominal obesity, has not been studied. We examined the association of BMI, abdominal obesity, and weight gain with risk of type 2 diabetes. Research Methods and Procedures: During eight years of follow-up of 49,766 women from the Black Women's Health Study, 2472 incident cases of diabetes occurred. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs), with control for age, physical activity, family history of diabetes, cigarette smoking, years of education, and time period of data collection. Results: Sixty-one percent of participants had a BMI ≥25 kg/m2 (WHO definition of overweight). Compared with a BMI of 45 kg/m2 was 23 (95% confidence interval, 17.0 to 31.0). The IRR for the highest quintile of waist-to-hip ratio relative to the lowest was 2.3 (95% confidence interval, 2.0 to 2.7) after control for BMI. Furthermore, at every level of BMI, an increased risk was observed for high waist-to-hip ratio relative to low. Discussion: Central obesity, as well as overall obesity, is a strong risk factor for diabetes in African-American women. Efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity in African-American women are of paramount importance.
  • References (20)
  • Citations (44)
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References20
Newest
Published on Jun 15, 2004in American Journal of Epidemiology 4.47
Marieke B. Snijder34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Marjolein Visser76
Estimated H-index: 76
+ 1 AuthorsJ.C. Seidell83
Estimated H-index: 83
Although previous studies have linked obesity to diabetes, the risks associated with weight gain or changes in body fat distribution have not been fully elucidated. The authors therefore prospectively examined the relations between changes in body weight and body fat distribution (1986–1996) and the subsequent risk of diabetes (1996–2000) among 22,171 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Weight gain was monotonically related to risk, and for every kilogram of weight gained, risk incr...
Published on Oct 9, 2002in JAMA 51.27
Katherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Margaret D. Carroll54
Estimated H-index: 54
+ 1 AuthorsClifford L. Johnson53
Estimated H-index: 53
ContextThe prevalence of obesity and overweight increased in the United States between 1978 and 1991. More recent reports have suggested continued increases but are based on self-reported data.ObjectiveTo examine trends and prevalences of overweight (body mass index [BMI] ≥25) and obesity (BMI ≥30), using measured height and weight data.Design, Setting, and ParticipantsSurvey of 4115 adult men and women conducted in 1999 and 2000 as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (N...
Published on Sep 12, 2001in JAMA 51.27
A.H. Mokdad57
Estimated H-index: 57
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Barbara A. Bowman36
Estimated H-index: 36
+ 3 AuthorsJeffrey P. Koplan28
Estimated H-index: 28
ContextRecent reports show that obesity and diabetes have increased in the United States in the past decade.ObjectiveTo estimate the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and use of weight control strategies among US adults in 2000.Design, Setting, and ParticipantsThe Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a random-digit telephone survey conducted in all states in 2000, with 184 450 adults aged 18 years or older.Main Outcome MeasuresBody mass index (BMI), calculated from self-reported weight and...
Published on Sep 1, 2000in Diabetes Care 15.27
Ali A. Mokdad91
Estimated H-index: 91
,
Earl S. Ford110
Estimated H-index: 110
+ 4 AuthorsJames S. Marks46
Estimated H-index: 46
OBJECTIVE: To examine trends in diabetes prevalence in the U.S. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This study was conducted via telephone surveys in states that participated in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System between 1990 and 1998. The participants consisted of noninstitutionalized adults aged 18 years or older. The main outcome measure was self-reported diabetes. RESULTS: The prevalence of diabetes rose from 4.9% in 1990 to 6.5% in 1998--an increase of 33%. Increases were observed in b...
Published on Nov 1, 1998in Diabetes Care 15.27
Helaine E. Resnick59
Estimated H-index: 59
,
Paola Valsania3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 1 AuthorsXihong Lin2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UM: University of Michigan)
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the associations of BMI and fat distribution with diabetes risk are modified by race. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Epidemiologic Follow-up Study (1971-1992), were used to investigate potential interactions of BMI and fat distribution with race. Incident diabetes was defined by self-report of physician-diagnosed diabetes, hospital and nursing home discharge records, and death certificates. RESULTS: Amo...
Published on Apr 1, 1998in Diabetes Care 15.27
Maureen I Harris45
Estimated H-index: 45
,
Katherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
+ 5 AuthorsDanita D. Byrd-Holt9
Estimated H-index: 9
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the prevalence and time trends for diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, and impaired glucose tolerance in U.S. adults by age, sex, and race or ethnic group, based on data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988–1994 (NHANES 111) and prior Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (HANESs). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS NHANES III contained a probability sample of 18,825 U.S. adults ≥20 years of age who were interviewed to ...
Published on Aug 1, 1997in American Journal of Epidemiology 4.47
Earl S. Ford110
Estimated H-index: 110
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
David F. Williamson82
Estimated H-index: 82
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Simin Liu102
Estimated H-index: 102
(Harvard University)
To examine how long-term patterns of weight change affect the risk for diabetes, especially non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, the authors examined the relation of weight change over a period of about 10 years (from the baseline examination in 1971-1975 until the first follow-up examination in 1982-1984) to the 9-year incidence of diabetes mellitus (1984-1992) in a national cohort of 8,545 US adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Followup Study. Dia...
Published on Apr 1, 1997in American Journal of Epidemiology 4.47
Vincent J. Carey60
Estimated H-index: 60
(Brigham and Women's Hospital),
Ellen E. Walters3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Brigham and Women's Hospital)
+ 5 AuthorsJoAnn E. Manson231
Estimated H-index: 231
(Harvard University)
Abstract Obesity is an established risk factor for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Anthropometric measures of overall and central obesity as predictors of NIDDM risk have not been as well studied, especially in women. Among 43,581 women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study who in 1986 provided waist, hip, and weight information and who were initially free from diabetes and other major chronic diseases, NIDDM incidence was followed from 1986 to 1994. After adjustment for age, fam...
Published on Apr 1, 1995in Annals of Internal Medicine 19.32
Graham A. Colditz239
Estimated H-index: 239
,
Barry M. Popkin319
Estimated H-index: 319
+ 1 AuthorsJoAnn E. Manson231
Estimated H-index: 231
Objective: To examine the relation between adult weight change and the risk for clinical diabetes mellitus among middle-aged women. Design: Prospective cohort study with follow-up from 1976 to 1990. Setting: 11 U.S. states. Participants: 114 281 female registered nurses aged 30 to 55 years who did not have diagnosed diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, stroke, or cancer in 1976. Outcome Measures: Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Results: 2204 cases of diabetes were diagnosed during...
Published on Mar 1, 1995in Diabetes 7.20
Robert L. Hanson72
Estimated H-index: 72
,
K. M. V. Narayan6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 4 AuthorsWilliam C. Knowler91
Estimated H-index: 91
The relationships of rate of weight gain and weight fluctuation to incidence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) were examined in Pima Indians. The 1,458 subjects were participants in a prospective study with examinations approximately every 2 years. Rate of weight gain was defined as the slope of the regression line of weight with time for two or more consecutive examinations ≥2 years apart and weight fluctuation as the root-mean-square departure from this line for four examinati...
Cited By44
Newest
Published on May 1, 2019in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism 6.13
Can Wang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PKU: Peking University),
Yao Xiao3
Estimated H-index: 3
(PKU: Peking University)
+ 14 AuthorsXueting Sun2
Estimated H-index: 2
(PKU: Peking University)
Terris R. Moss (RU: Rutgers University)
Abstract Objective To examine obesity and diabetes associations with United States hospital use and healthcare costs for African American women, to explore the relationship between co-morbidities of interest (obesity and diabetes) and hospital resources [length of stay (LOS) and costs]. Methods A retrospective, correlation, quantitative analysis for lengths of hospital stay and cost among adult African American women categorized according to their weight status with type 2 diabetes. Healthcare C...
Published on May 8, 2018in PLOS ONE 2.78
Gerald V. Denis26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
Paola Sebastiani45
Estimated H-index: 45
+ 6 AuthorsJulie R. Palmer38
Estimated H-index: 38
Published on Nov 15, 2017in Cancer Research 8.38
Julie R. Palmer58
Estimated H-index: 58
(BU: Boston University),
Nelsy Castro-Webb5
Estimated H-index: 5
(BU: Boston University)
+ 2 AuthorsGerald V. Denis26
Estimated H-index: 26
(BU: Boston University)
White women with type II diabetes (T2D) have an estimated 20% increased risk of developing breast cancer. Little is known about associations by breast cancer subtype or among African American (AA) women, who are disproportionately affected by T2D and estrogen receptor negative (ER−) breast cancer. We assessed the relation of T2D to incidence of ER− and ER+ breast cancer in data from the Black Women9s Health Study, a prospective cohort of AA women enrolled in 1995 and followed biennially. During ...
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Preventive Medicine 3.45
Huanhuan Hu3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Satsue Nagahama8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 25 AuthorsIkuko Kashino13
Estimated H-index: 13
Abstract We prospectively examined diabetes risk in association with a summary measure of degree and duration of weight change. The study participants were 51,777 employees from multiple companies in Japan, who were aged 30–59 years, free of diabetes at baseline, and followed up for 7 years (2008–2015). Exposure was cumulative body mass index (BMI)-years, which was defined as the area of BMI units above or below baseline BMI during follow-up, and was treated as a time-dependent variable in the C...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Cancer Causes & Control 2.30
Marjory Charlot6
Estimated H-index: 6
(BU: Boston University),
Nelsy Castro-Webb5
Estimated H-index: 5
(BU: Boston University)
+ 6 AuthorsJulie R. Palmer38
Estimated H-index: 38
(BU: Boston University)
Purpose Breast cancer mortality is higher in Black women than in White women. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is also higher, yet data on whether diabetes affects breast cancer mortality in this population are lacking. We investigated the relation of diabetes at the time of breast cancer diagnosis to breast cancer mortality in the Black Women’s Health Study, a prospective cohort study.
Published on Dec 15, 2016in International Journal of Cancer 4.98
Sarah J. O. Nomura4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Georgetown University),
Chiranjeev Dash14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Georgetown University)
+ 3 AuthorsLucile L. Adams-Campbell21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Georgetown University)
Adherence to cancer prevention recommendations has been associated with lower incidence of breast cancer in previous studies, but evidence in African American women is limited. This project evaluated the association between adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) cancer prevention recommendations and breast cancer incidence among African American women. The Black Women's Health Study (analytic cohort=49,103) is an ongoing prospective cohort ...
Published on Oct 1, 2016in The North American Actuarial Journal
Sam Gutterman1
Estimated H-index: 1
The percentage of the population who are obese has grown dramatically on a worldwide basis over the last several decades, although the growth in the prevalence of obesity has slowed recently at a high level in the United States. Although there have been numerous studies of the effect of this trend on mortality, the findings have been inconsistent and controversial, in part because of methodological differences and the complexity of the relationships between obesity and mortality. The objective o...
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Environmental Research 5.03
Patricia F. Coogan34
Estimated H-index: 34
(BU: Boston University),
Laura F. White16
Estimated H-index: 16
(BU: Boston University)
+ 7 AuthorsMichael Jerrett17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)
Abstract While laboratory studies show that air pollutants can potentiate insulin resistance, the epidemiologic evidence regarding the association of air pollution with diabetes incidence is conflicting. The purpose of the present study was to assess the association of the traffic-related nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) with the incidence of diabetes in a longitudinal cohort study of African American women. We used Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals ...
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Cancer Causes & Control 2.30
Sarah J. O. Nomura4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Georgetown University),
Chiranjeev Dash14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Georgetown University)
+ 3 AuthorsLucile L. Adams-Campbell21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Georgetown University)
Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) cancer prevention recommendations was associated with colorectal cancer incidence in the Black Women’s Health Study (BWHS).