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Atmospheric forcing of sea ice in Hudson Bay during the spring period, 1980–2005

Published on Dec 1, 2011in Journal of Marine Systems 2.54
· DOI :10.1016/j.jmarsys.2011.05.003
Klaus P. Hochheim9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Jennifer V. Lukovich12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UM: University of Manitoba),
David G. Barber37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UM: University of Manitoba)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract In this study we show recent trends in sea ice concentration (SIC) and sea ice extent (SIE) in Hudson Bay (HB) using Canadian Ice Service (CIS) data and passive microwave (PMW) data for the spring period, week of year (WOY) 24–30. Reductions in sea ice concentration and sea ice extent are examined in light of thermodynamic and dynamic forcing of sea ice. Results show surface air temperature (SAT) anomalies surrounding Hudson Bay have been increasing by 0.26 to 0.30 °C/decade from 1960 to 2005 accompanied by negative trends in SIC (− 15.1 to − 20.4%/decade) in western and southwestern Hudson Bay. SIE trends are negative with reductions ranging from − 8790 to − 10,035 km²/year depending on WOY. East–west asymmetry in SIC anomalies in Hudson Bay is investigated in the context of dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena, namely surface winds that drive sea ice circulation as monitored by relative vorticity, and SAT. Sea ice vorticity is linked to variations in atmospheric pressure and resultant changes in mean wind patterns over Hudson Bay. Variations in SIC across Hudson Bay are shown to be significantly related to spring and fall (lag − 1 year) SATs and the zonal (east–west) component of surface winds. Spring and fall SATs together with relative vorticity are also shown to be highly predictive of SIEs, while late in the melt season spring SAT anomalies are the most predictive.
  • References (26)
  • Citations (37)
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References26
Newest
Published on May 11, 2010in Journal of Geophysical Research 3.23
K. P. Hochheim1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UM: University of Manitoba),
David G. Barber37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UM: University of Manitoba)
[1] The principal objective of this study is to describe the autumn sea ice regime of Hudson Bay in the context of atmospheric forcing from 1980 to 2005. Both gridded Canadian Ice Service (CIS) data and Passive Microwave (PMW) data are used to examine the freezeup period for weeks of year (WOY) 43–52. Sea ice concentration (SIC) anomalies reveal statistically significant trends, ranging from −23.3% to −26.9% per decade, during WOY 43–48 using the CIS data and trends ranging from −12.7% to −16.8%...
Published on Jan 29, 2010in Arctic 1.43
Alexandre S. Gagnon13
Estimated H-index: 13
(U of T: University of Toronto),
William A. Gough17
Estimated H-index: 17
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Hudson Bay experiences a complete cryogenic cycle each year. Sea ice begins to form in late October, and the Bay is usually ice-free in early August. This seasonally varying ice cover plays an important role in the regional climate. To identify secular trends in the cryogenic cycle, we examined variability in the timing of sea-ice formation and retreat during the period 1971– 2003. The dates of ice freeze-up and breakup at 36 locations across Hudson Bay were catalogued for each year from weekly ...
Published on Jan 1, 2010
D. B. Stewart1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
D. G. Barber1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UM: University of Manitoba)
Arctic marine water, vast inputs of fresh water, nearly complete seasonal ice cover, and dynamic coastal morphology make the Hudson Bay (HB) complex remarkable among the world’s large marine areas (LMEs). Each of these features is influenced by the climate. Together they enable Foxe Basin, Hudson Strait, Ungava Bay, Hudson Bay and James Bay which comprise the HB complex, to support a well developed Arctic marine food web far south of its normal range. The life history characteristics that enable...
Published on Jan 1, 2010
Steven H. Ferguson32
Estimated H-index: 32
,
Lisa L. Loseto17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Mark L. Mallory18
Estimated H-index: 18
Dedication.- Introduction.- 1. Physical, chemical, and biological conditions of the Hudson Bay marine region.- 2. Changing Sea Ice Conditions in Hudson Bay, 1979-2005.- 3. Importance of eating capelin: Unique dietary habits of Hudson Bay beluga.- 4. Migration route and seasonal home range of the Northern Hudson Bay narwhal (Monodon monoceros).- 5. Polar bear ecology and management in Hudson Bay in the face of climate change.- 6. The rise of killer whales as a major Arctic predator.- 7. Hudson Ba...
Published on Dec 29, 2009in Journal of Geophysical Research 3.23
Thorsten Markus35
Estimated H-index: 35
(GSFC: Goddard Space Flight Center),
Julienne C. Stroeve46
Estimated H-index: 46
(CU: University of Colorado Boulder),
Jeffrey Miller5
Estimated H-index: 5
(GSFC: Goddard Space Flight Center)
[1] In order to explore changes and trends in the timing of Arctic sea ice melt onset and freezeup, and therefore melt season length, we developed a method that obtains this information directly from satellite passive microwave data, creating a consistent data set from 1979 through present. We furthermore distinguish between early melt (the first day of the year when melt is detected) and the first day of continuous melt. A similar distinction is made for the freezeup. Using this method we analy...
Published on Jul 1, 2008in Journal of Geophysical Research 3.23
Claire L. Parkinson39
Estimated H-index: 39
(GSFC: Goddard Space Flight Center),
Donald J. Cavalieri41
Estimated H-index: 41
(GSFC: Goddard Space Flight Center)
Analyses of 28 years (1979-2006) of Antarctic sea ice extents and areas derived from satellite passive microwave radiometers are presented and placed in the context of results obtained previously for the 20-year period 1979-1998. We present monthly averaged sea ice extents and areas, monthly deviations, yearly and seasonal averages, and their trends for the Southern Hemisphere as a whole and for each of five sectors: the Weddell Sea, the Indian Ocean, the western Pacific Ocean, the Ross Sea, and...
Published on May 31, 2008in Journal of Geophysical Research 3.23
R. J. Galley18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Erica L. Key8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UM: University of Miami)
+ 2 AuthorsJens K. Ehn23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UM: University of Manitoba)
[1] Changing extent, location, and motion of the Arctic perennial pack affect the annual evolution of seasonal ice zones. Canadian Ice Service digital ice charts covering the southern Beaufort Sea and Amundsen Gulf are used to illustrate summer and winter conditions and trends between 1980 and 2004 for several sea ice stages of development. Results illustrate average sea ice conditions within the region in summer and winter for predominant sea ice types and changes in the relative concentration ...
Published on Jan 22, 2008in Geophysical Research Letters 4.58
Clara Deser64
Estimated H-index: 64
(NCAR: National Center for Atmospheric Research),
Haiyan Teng29
Estimated H-index: 29
(NCAR: National Center for Atmospheric Research)
[1] The retreat of Arctic sea ice in recent decades is a pre-eminent signal of climate change. What role has the atmospheric circulation played in driving the sea ice decline? To address this question, we document the evolution of Arctic sea ice concentration trends during the period January 1979–April 2007 in light of changing atmospheric circulation conditions, in particular an upward trend in the wintertime Northern Annular Mode during the first half of the record and a downward trend during ...
Published on Jan 3, 2008in Geophysical Research Letters 4.58
Josefino C. Comiso54
Estimated H-index: 54
(GSFC: Goddard Space Flight Center),
Claire L. Parkinson39
Estimated H-index: 39
(GSFC: Goddard Space Flight Center)
+ 1 AuthorsLarry V. Stock3
Estimated H-index: 3
(GSFC: Goddard Space Flight Center)
[1] Satellite data reveal unusually low Arctic sea ice coverage during the summer of 2007, caused in part by anomalously high temperatures and southerly winds. The extent and area of the ice cover reached minima on 14 September 2007 at 4.1 × 106 km2 and 3.6 × 106 km2, respectively. These are 24% and 27% lower than the previous record lows, both reached on 21 September 2005, and 37% and 38% less than the climatological averages. Acceleration in the decline is evident as the extent and area trends...
Published on Jan 1, 2007in Elsevier oceanography series
David G. Barber19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Ra Massom31
Estimated H-index: 31
Polynyas are relatively ice-free regions when compared to the areas around them, and have been suggested as being foci for energy transfer between the atmosphere and ocean, ice "factories", and critical areas with respect to polar ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles. This volume presents an integrated, multidisciplinary review of polynyas in both the Arctic and Antarctic. It emphasizes the meteorology, ice dynamics, oceanography, biological components, chemistry, and modeling of these systems, ...
Cited By37
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2018
Martyn E. Obbard22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources),
Seth Stapleton7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
+ 3 AuthorsMarkus Dyck6
Estimated H-index: 6
The Southern Hudson Bay polar bear (Ursus maritimus Phipps, 1774) subpopulation is considered stable but conflicting evidence lends uncertainty to that designation. Capture-recapture studies conducted 1984-86 and 2003-05 and an aerial survey conducted 2011/12 suggested abundance was likely unchanged since the mid-1980s. However, body condition and body size declined since then, and duration of sea ice decreased by about 30 days. Due to conflicting information on subpopulation status and ongoing ...
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Polar Biology 2.00
Katie R. N. Florko (York University), Warren Bernhardt1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 4 AuthorsStephen D. Petersen6
Estimated H-index: 6
Harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) occur in the Arctic but little is known of their population abundance and natural history. In western Hudson Bay, they occur at lower numbers relative to ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and their distribution is largely unknown. However, a reduction in the duration of periods of ice cover in Hudson Bay may be shifting the habitat suitability of the region towards one that favours harbour seals. Harbour seal counts from a known haul-out site at the upstream extent of th...
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Remote Sensing of Environment 8.22
Jack C. Landy8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Jens K. Ehn23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UM: University of Manitoba)
+ 2 AuthorsDavid G. Barber37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UM: University of Manitoba)
Abstract Past observations of sea ice thickness in the Eastern Canadian Arctic (ECA) have generally been restricted to drill-hole measurements at a few local sites on landfast ice. Here we use data from the laser altimeter ICESat and the radar altimeter Cryosat-2 to present a 14-year record (2003–2016) of high-resolution and spatially extensive ice thickness observations for the ECA and identify 12 sub-regions with distinct patterns. The mean sea ice growth rate within the seasonally ice-covered...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Theoretical and Applied Climatology 2.72
Slawomir Kowal4
Estimated H-index: 4
(U of T: University of Toronto),
William A. Gough17
Estimated H-index: 17
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Ken Butler4
Estimated H-index: 4
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Previous work has found Hudson Bay seasonal sea ice particularly sensitive to climate change with a strong signal of earlier breakup dates. This work extends the previous analysis by including eight additional years of recent sea ice data. The expanded sea ice record, 1971 to 2011, revealed stronger and more statistically significant trends than the earlier work, most strikingly for the later freeze up. The average magnitude of the temporal trend for all 36 locations studied is 0.50 days/year fo...
Published on Dec 30, 2016
Hermanni Kaartokallio21
Estimated H-index: 21
(SYKE: Finnish Environment Institute),
Mats A. Granskog24
Estimated H-index: 24
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
+ 1 AuthorsJouni Vainio5
Estimated H-index: 5
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Atmospheric Science Letters 1.80
Masayo Ogi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UM: University of Manitoba),
David G. Barber37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Søren Rysgaard50
Estimated H-index: 50
(UM: University of Manitoba)
The trends and interannual variations of summer sea ice extents (SIEs) in both Hudson Bay and the Arctic Ocean are investigated in association with variations in atmospheric circulation and air temperature. The summer SIE variabilities of both Hudson Bay and the Arctic Ocean are well correlated and have a strong negative trend. The negative SIE trends are associated with a summer atmospheric circulation pattern that is characterized by positive anomalies over the Arctic Ocean and negative anomal...
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Theoretical and Applied Climatology 2.72
Andrew Leung2
Estimated H-index: 2
(U of T: University of Toronto),
William A. Gough17
Estimated H-index: 17
(U of T: University of Toronto)
The linkage between changes in air mass distribution and temperature trends from 1971 to 2010 is explored in the Hudson Bay/Foxe Basin region. Statistically significant temperature increases were found of varying spatial and temporal magnitude. Concurrent statistically significant changes in air mass frequency at the same locations were also detected, particularly in the declining frequency of dry polar (DP) air. These two sets of changes were found to be linked, and we thus conclude that the he...
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Population Ecology 1.51
Alysa G. McCall3
Estimated H-index: 3
(U of A: University of Alberta),
Nicholas W. Pilfold6
Estimated H-index: 6
(U of A: University of Alberta)
+ 1 AuthorsNicholas J. Lunn13
Estimated H-index: 13
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Individual variation in habitat selection has emerged as an important component necessary for understanding population ecology. For threatened species, where habitat loss and alteration affect population trends, understanding habitat use provides insight into mechanisms of population change. Polar bears, Ursus maritimus, in the Western Hudson Bay subpopulation have experienced declines in body condition, survival, and abundance associated with delayed freeze-up and earlier break-up of sea ice du...
Published on May 27, 2016
Kristina Kirilova Delidjakova , Richard Bello2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 1 AuthorsBipin Pokharel
Eddy covariance (EC) estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and the surface energy balance were gathered from an elevated peat plateau within the Hudson Bay Lowlands near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada (58°43′46″N, 93°49′57″W) during the growing season of 2007. Data were segregated into onshore and offshore wind regimes to assess the advective influence of the generally cold and moist Hudson Bay air masses compared to generally warm and dry air masses of nonmarine origin. Monthly average NEE ran...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Marine Mammal Science 2.02
Ian Stirling62
Estimated H-index: 62
(U of A: University of Alberta),
Cheryl Spencer3
Estimated H-index: 3
(U of A: University of Alberta),
Dennis Andriashek1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of A: University of Alberta)
We quantify the first complete description of breeding behavior and activity budgets of an undisturbed pair of adult polar bears, observed 24 h/d for 13 d from 2 to 15 May 1997, at Radstock Bay, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada. The male herded the female to an area of 1–2 km2, where we observed them throughout the observation period. All behaviors were documented from when the adult female and her 2.5-yr-old cub were first observed being followed by an adult male, through separation of the cub fro...