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Long-term land-use changes and extinction of specialised butterflies

Published on Sep 1, 2008in Insect Conservation and Diversity 2.09
· DOI :10.1111/j.1752-4598.2008.00027.x
Sven G. Nilsson39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Lund University),
Markus Franzén19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Lund University),
Emma Jönsson1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract
1. Land-use change in 450 ha in southern Sweden between 1814 and 2004 was recorded. Butterflies and burnet moths were surveyed in 1904–1913 and 2001–2005. 2. We explore if local extinctions were related to land-use changes and species attributes. 3. Land use changed drastically over the 190-year period, and the largest relative change occurred for hay meadows with late harvest, which decreased from 28% to 0%. The area changed from grasslands and grazed forests to being dominated by timber forests. Previous open grazed mixed woodlands changed to spruce plantations with clear-cuts. 4. Of the 48 resident butterfly and burnet moths found a century ago, 44% have become extinct. The extinct Aporia crataegi, Colias palaeno, and Leptidea sinapis were abundant 100 years ago and had their highest densities in flower-rich glades in forest, a habitat which no longer exists. 5. The butterfly extinctions could be predicted from species-specific attributes as a short flight length period (P < 0.02), narrow habitat breadth (P < 0.02), small distribution area in Europe (P = 0.033) and possibly larvae food plant nitrogen class (P < 0.06). In a multiple logistic regression, the flight length period was the only significant variable because the independent variables were intercorrelated. 6. We conclude that the most important factor explaining the high extinction rate is that flower-rich habitats have disappeared from both woodlands as well as from open farmlands. The most sensitive species are specialised species with a short summer flight which have gone extinct. Only the most unspecialised species still persist in the current landscape. (Less)
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  • Citations (51)
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References52
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2008in Ecography 4.52
Markus Franzén19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Sven G. Nilsson39
Estimated H-index: 39
During recent decades, concern about the loss of biodiversity on agricultural land has increased, and semi-natural grasslands have been highlighted as critical habitats. Temperate European agricultural landscapes require distinct and appropriate management to prevent further impoverishment of the flora and fauna. This is especially urgent for pollinating insects that provide important ecosystem services. Our aim was to examine how species richness of three important groups of pollinating insects...
39 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2007in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Emmanuelle Polus3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Sofie Vandewoestijne12
Estimated H-index: 12
+ 1 AuthorsMichel Baguette42
Estimated H-index: 42
Habitat loss and fragmentation are known to reduce patch sizes and increase their isolation, consequently leading to modifications in species richness and community structure. Calcareous grasslands are among the richest ecosystems in Europe for insect species. About 10% (1,150 ha) of the total area of a calcareous ridge region (Calestienne, Belgium) and its butterfly community was analysed over a timeframe of about 100 years. Since 1905 to present day (2005), the Calestienne region has undergone...
68 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 29, 2007in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Mikko Kuussaari25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Finnish Environment Institute),
Janne Heliölä13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Finnish Environment Institute)
+ 1 AuthorsKimmo Saarinen11
Estimated H-index: 11
Indicator classifications help us to focus on the most relevant groups of species in monitoring the effects of land use changes on biodiversity. We studied changes in distribution area of 74 butterfly species preferring one of the three common habitats of boreal agricultural landscapes: semi-natural grasslands (35 species), arable field margins (7) and forest edges (32). Using extensive atlas data from four time periods during the last 50 years in Finland, we quantified trends in the occupancy o...
75 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 29, 2007in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Markus Franzén19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Lund University),
Mikael Johannesson11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Skövde)
An extensive follow-up study of day- and night-active Macrolepidoptera was performed during 2004 at the Kullaberg Nature Reserve located in the south-western part of Sweden. Butterflies were surveyed in an area of 100 km2 and night-active moths were trapped in the core area of the reserve. Macrolepidopteran species resident in the area in the 1950s were compared with species resident in the area in 2004. As much as 159 of 597 species (27%) resident in the area in 1950s were not found at all in 2...
37 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2006in Forest Ecology and Management 3.17
Jiri Benes12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Oldrich Cizek11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Sewanee: The University of the South)
+ 1 AuthorsMartin Konvicka32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Sewanee: The University of the South)
Abstract While transfers of formerly coppiced or grazed woodlands into shady high forests cause severe declines of woodland butterflies across Europe, increasing numbers of wild ungulates contribute to maintaining stand openness. To disentangle the relative effects of management and ungulates, we studied butterfly assemblages in the Milovicky Wood, southeastern Czech Republic. After centuries of short-rotation coppicing, the wood was abandoned in the 1950s and two game parks, for deer and mouflo...
55 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2006in Journal of Ecology 5.17
Frank S. Gilliam29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Marshall University)
Summary 1 This review brings into focus what is known about the response of the herbaceous layer of forest ecosystems to increasing nitrogen deposition. The emphasis on forests in general is important for two reasons. First, forests often occupy areas receiving high rates of atmospheric deposition of N. Second, compared with herb-dominated communities, about which much is known regarding response to excess N, forests generally display greater biological and structural complexity. The more specif...
249 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2006in Biological Conservation 4.66
Kelvin F. Conrad7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Rothamsted Research),
Martin Warren27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Butterfly Conservation)
+ 2 AuthorsIan P. Woiwod33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Rothamsted Research)
Abstract A fundamental problem in estimating biodiversity loss is that very little quantitative data are available for insects, which comprise more than two-thirds of terrestrial species. We present national population trends for a species-rich and ecologically diverse insect group: widespread and common macro-moths in Britain. Two-thirds of the 337 species studied have declined over the 35 yr study and 21% (71) of the species declined >30% 10 yr −1 . If IUCN (World Conservation Union) criteria ...
230 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 28, 2006in Journal of Applied Ecology 5.74
Johan Wretenberg5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences),
Åke Lindström42
Estimated H-index: 42
(Lund University)
+ 2 AuthorsTomas Pärt40
Estimated H-index: 40
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Studies, mainly from the UK, show that many farmland birds have declined as a result of recent agricultural intensification. We tested this idea by analysing farmland bird population trends in Sweden, a country displaying less dramatic agricultural changes and less intensive agriculture. Specifically we investigated whether (i) farmland specialists have declined more than generalists, (ii) population declines in Sweden are less marked than in England and (iii) Swedish population trends are assoc...
114 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2006in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Chris van Swaay23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Butterfly Conservation),
Martin Warren27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Butterfly Conservation),
Grégoire Loïs1
Estimated H-index: 1
Europe has undergone substantial biotope loss and change over the last century and data are needed urgently on the rate of decline in different wildlife groups in order to identify and target conservation measures. However, pan-European data are available for very few taxonomic groups, notably birds. We present here the first overview of trends for an insect group within different biotopes across Europe, based on data from the Red Data Book of European Butterflies. The most important biotopes fo...
204 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 21, 2006in Science 41.06
Jacobus C. Biesmeijer37
Estimated H-index: 37
(University of Leeds),
Stuart Roberts26
Estimated H-index: 26
(University of Reading)
+ 9 AuthorsChris D. Thomas84
Estimated H-index: 84
(University of York)
Despite widespread concern about declines in pollination services, little is known about the patterns of change in most pollinator assemblages. By studying bee and hoverfly assemblages in Britain and the Netherlands, we found evidence of declines (pre-versus post-1980) in local bee diversity in both countries; however, divergent trends were observed in hoverflies. Depending on the assemblage and location, pollinator declines were most frequent in habitat and flower specialists, in univoltine spe...
1,486 Citations Source Cite
Cited By51
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Published on May 1, 2019in Plant Biology 2.16
E. Dello Jacovo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(James Hutton Institute),
Tracy A. Valentine16
Estimated H-index: 16
(James Hutton Institute)
+ 10 AuthorsValerie A. Ferro21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Strathclyde)
Lathyrus linifolius L. (Reichard) Bassler (bitter vetch) is a fabaceous nitrogen (N) fixing species. A coloniser of low nutrient (N) soils it supports biodiversity such as key moth and butterfly species and its roots are known for their organoleptic and claimed therapeutic properties. Thus, the species has high potential for restoration, conservation, novel cropping and as model species. The latter owing to its genetic synteny with important pulse crops. However, regeneration and functional attr...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Insect Conservation and Diversity 2.09
Katharina Homburg5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Lüneburg University),
Claudia Drees11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Hamburg)
+ 5 AuthorsThorsten Assmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Lüneburg University)
1. The drastic insect decline has received increasing attention in scientific as well as in public media. Long-term studies of insect diversity trends are still rare, even though such studies are highly important to assess extent, drivers and potential consequences of insect loss in ecosystems. 2. To gain insights into carabid diversity trends of ancient and sustainably managed woodlands, we analysed data of carabid beetles from a trapping study that has been run for 24 years in an old nature re...
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Wildlife Society Bulletin 1.30
Brice Hanberry (United States Department of Agriculture), Frank R. Thompson45
Estimated H-index: 45
(United States Department of Agriculture)
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Insect Conservation and Diversity 2.09
Gaël Delpon1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Montpellier),
Hélène Vogt-Schilb4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Montpellier)
+ 2 AuthorsBertrand Schatz23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Montpellier)
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Ecology and Evolution 2.34
Manisha Bhardwaj2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Melbourne),
Kylie Soanes6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Melbourne)
+ 2 AuthorsRodney van der Ree25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Melbourne)
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Published on Jun 1, 2018in Functional Ecology 5.49
Joe Middleton‐Welling1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Oxford Brookes University),
Rachel A. Wade1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Oxford Brookes University)
+ 2 AuthorsTim G. Shreeve27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Oxford Brookes University)
1.Functional traits that define the ecological role of an organism are increasingly being used to determine and predict responses to environmental change. Functional trait analyses of butterflies remain underexplored compared with other taxa, such as plants. Previous works using butterfly functional traits have not comprehensively addressed issues about the quality of trait datasets used and the relative predictive power of different trait types. 2.We compare the consistency of trait description...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2018in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Pedro I. Chiquetto-Machado2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of São Paulo),
Felipe W. Amorim9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Sao Paulo State University),
Marcelo Duarte9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of São Paulo)
Hawkmoths are an important component of tropical ecosystems, with significant roles as herbivores and pollinators. These moths can be used as indicators in biodiversity assessments because they can be easily sampled and identified. However, hawkmoths have seldom been surveyed over the long term for this purpose, especially in the Neotropical region. Considering that long-term datasets are of indisputable importance for understanding and monitoring temporal changes in biodiversity, this study ass...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Paula Kleintjes Neff1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire),
Christina Locke1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Eric Lee-Mӓder1
Estimated H-index: 1
Private lands provide critical habitat for threatened and endangered species, but only recently have farm-based conservation programs focused on at-risk, invertebrate species. The USDA Conservation Reserve Program State Acres for Wildlife Enhancement (CRP-SAFE) is one of the first federal programs to do so with a Wisconsin-based initiative for the US federally endangered Karner blue butterfly (KBB). This study is the first to evaluate how well the KBB-SAFE provides suitable habitat for the Karne...
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Published on Dec 1, 2017in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Johanna Trappe1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Münster),
Friederike Kunz1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Münster)
+ 1 AuthorsJohannes Kamp11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Münster)
Land-use change and homogenization of the landscape are severe threats to butterfly diversity. The break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991 led to land abandonment on very large scales. This study aims at assessing the impact of the ongoing abandonment of traditionally managed grasslands and subsequent vegetation succession on butterflies in Western Siberia, a species-rich area with butterfly communities similar to those of Central and Eastern European grasslands. 20 mown and 20 abandoned grasslands...
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Published on Dec 1, 2017in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Christine Haaland5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Urbanisation is a rapidly ongoing process worldwide with profound consequences for wildlife in urban and peri-urban areas. Species are affected by habitat loss, habitat alternation and degradation, fragmentation and increased human population and activity. Habitat loss can occur due to construction of housing and infrastructure in peri-urban areas and within urban areas due to compaction. Undeveloped areas can also be changed from ruderal land, wilderness areas or leftover green space to more fo...
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