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Exploring student interaction during collaborative prewriting discussions and its relationship to L2 writing

Published on Mar 1, 2015in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
· DOI :10.1016/j.jslw.2014.09.009
Heike Neumann5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Concordia University),
Kim McDonough13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Concordia University)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract In second language (L2) writing classrooms, prewriting discussions are one of the most commonly used collaborative activities ( Fernandez Dobao, 2012 , Storch, 2005 ), yet there has been little research about their relationship to students’ written texts. Recent L2 writing research has examined the textual features of co-constructed texts (e.g., Elola and Oskoz, 2010 , Kuiken and Vedder, 2002 , Storch and Wigglesworth, 2007 ), whereas the pretask planning literature has focused mainly on the effect of individual planning (e.g., Ellis and Yuan, 2004 , Kroll, 1990 , Ojima, 2006 ). The current study investigates the relationship between interaction during collaborative prewriting tasks and students’ written texts in an English for academic purposes (EAP) course. The findings indicate that structured collaborative prewriting tasks elicited student talk about content and organization, but there is only a moderate relationships between these prewriting discussions and the students’ written texts. Implications for the use of collaborative prewriting discussions in EAP contexts are discussed.
  • References (51)
  • Citations (18)
Cite
References51
Newest
Kim McDonough10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Pavel Trofimovich23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Heike Neumann5
Estimated H-index: 5
Abstract: This study focuses on the pedagogical applications of structural priming research in an English for academic purposes (EAP) context, investigating whether priming activities are an effective tool for eliciting production of target grammatical structures. University students across four EAP classes carried out a total of 6 information-exchange activities over a 13-week semester. Some students received information-exchange activities that provided models of the target structures (e.g., p...
This study examines the opportunities that a collaborative writing task completed in pairs and in small groups offers for attention to form. Previous research suggests that collaborative writing activities encourage learners to focus their attention on language and to collaborate in the resolution of their language-related problems in ways that facilitate learning. While that research focused almost exclusively on dyads, the present study compares the performance of the same writing task by lear...
Published on Jul 4, 2013
Neomy Storch26
Estimated H-index: 26
Preface Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Theoretical and pedagogical rationale for collaborative L2 writing Chapter 3: Collaborative writing: L2 learning and practice opportunities Chapter 4: Factors affecting languaging in collaborative writing Chapter 5: Collaborative writing and language learning Chapter 6: Learners' perspectives of collaborative writing Chapter 7: Computer mediated collaborative writing Chapter 8: Conclusion: Pedagogical implications and research directions
Published on Jun 1, 2013in System1.93
Ana María Fernández Dobao6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UW: University of Washington),
Avram Blum2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UW: University of Washington)
Abstract This study explored learners' attitudes and perceptions toward collaborative writing in pairs and small groups. Fifty-five intermediate level learners of Spanish as a foreign language were asked to complete a collaborative writing task as part of their classroom activities. Half of them worked in pairs and the other half in groups of four. Afterward, they all received the same post-task questionnaire. Learners' reactions to the collaborative writing experience were overall very positive...
Published on Mar 1, 2013in TESOL Quarterly2.72
Pavel Trofimovich23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Concordia University),
Kim McDonough10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Concordia University),
Heike Neumann5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Concordia University)
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Language Teaching Research2.32
Neomy Storch26
Estimated H-index: 26
(University of Melbourne),
Ali Aldosari5
Estimated H-index: 5
(KSU: King Saud University)
Although pair work is advocated by major theories of second language (L2) learning and research findings suggest that pair work facilitates L2 learning, what is unclear is how to best pair students in L2 classes of mixed L2 proficiency. This study investigated the nature of pair work in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) class in a college in Saudi Arabia. The L2 proficiency of the learners in such classes is often quite heterogeneous. Thirty learners allocated into similar (high–high and lo...
Published on Dec 1, 2012in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Gillian Wigglesworth22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Melbourne),
Neomy Storch26
Estimated H-index: 26
(University of Melbourne)
Abstract Writing is generally thought of as an activity which is carried out individually, often with feedback then provided by a teacher or colleague. While the use of pair or small group work in the second language classroom in relation to oral work has been extensively studied, and its benefits well documented, there are only a few studies which have documented the advantages of collaboration in written work, and in dealing with written feedback. Mostly conducted within a sociocultural framew...
Published on Mar 1, 2012in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Ana María Fernández Dobao6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UW: University of Washington)
Abstract This study investigates the benefits of collaborative writing tasks. Previous research from the perspective of the sociocultural theory of mind suggests that writing tasks completed in pairs offer learners an opportunity to collaborate in the solution of their language-related problems, co-construct new language knowledge, and produce linguistically more accurate written texts. Building on this research, the present study compares the performance of the same writing task by groups of fo...
Published on Dec 1, 2011in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Ali Shehadeh10
Estimated H-index: 10
(United Arab Emirates University)
Abstract This study investigated the effectiveness and students’ perceptions of collaborative writing (CW) in second language (L2). The study involved 38 first year students in two intact classes at a large university in the UAE (United Arab Emirates). One class consisted of 18 students and was considered the experimental group, and the second consisted of 20 students and was considered the control group. In the control group, writing tasks were carried out by students individually; in the exper...
Published on Apr 1, 2011in Language Teaching Research2.32
YouJin Kim16
Estimated H-index: 16
(GSU: Georgia State University),
Kim McDonough10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Concordia University)
The current study examines the impact of pretask modelling on the collaborative learning opportunities that occurred when Korean learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) carried out three tasks: dictogloss, decision-making, and information-gap. Forty-four adolescents who were enrolled in a required English course at a middle school in Korea completed the tasks over a two-week period. Half of the learners viewed videotaped models of collaborative interaction prior to carrying out the tasks...
Cited By18
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2019in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Meixiu Zhang (NAU: Northern Arizona University)
Abstract Understanding the nature of collaboration is critical in collaborative writing (CW), as it impacts the amount of scaffolding that occurs and the amount of linguistic knowledge that can be retained (Storch, 2013). The most prevalent model to examine peer collaboration in CW is based on a global qualitative analysis of learners’ involvement in and control over a writing task (Storch, 2001a). However, this model does not account for the fluctuating nature of peer collaboration in CW. This ...
Sooyeon Kang (CAU: Chung-Ang University), Jin-Hwa Lee (CAU: Chung-Ang University)
Abstract This study investigated the effects of individual versus collaborative pre-task planning on second language (L2) writing, particularly in relation to task complexity manipulated in terms of the number of task elements. The participants were 40 8th-grade Korean learners of English who were divided into simple and complex task groups. Each group performed two writing tasks: one using individual planning and one using collaborative planning in pairs. After planning, the participants indivi...
Published on Jul 4, 2019in Language Teaching Research2.32
Meixiu Zhang (NAU: Northern Arizona University)
Despite previous research suggesting that first language (L1) use fulfills important functions in collaborative writing (CW) tasks, research has yet to examine whether L1 or second language (L2) us...
Published on Jun 2, 2019in Education 3-131.79
Hari Jang (NTU: Nanyang Technological University), Yin Ling Cheung (NTU: Nanyang Technological University)
ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of pair interaction on the process and product of collaborative writing through analysing Language Related Episodes (LREs) and studen...
Published on May 20, 2019in Computer Assisted Language Learning2.02
Hsiu-Chen Hsu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CYCU: Chung Yuan Christian University)
AbstractPrior research has shown that EFL learners who wrote collaboratively with partners using wikis improved the content quality and language accuracy of their L2 individual writing more than students who wrote individually. Drawing on the dataset from Hsu and Lo's study, the current study explores the nature of the students’ collaborative dialogue that occurred during wiki collaborative writing and the potential link between wiki collaboration and development in individual L2 writing. The st...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in TESOL Quarterly2.72
William J. Crawford4
Estimated H-index: 4
(NAU: Northern Arizona University),
Kim McDonough10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Concordia University),
Nicole Brun‐Mercer (NAU: Northern Arizona University)
Published on Jan 26, 2019in Computer Assisted Language Learning2.02
Qing Ma3
Estimated H-index: 3
(HKU: University of Hong Kong),
Qing Ma (HKU: University of Hong Kong)
AbstractThis study investigated how one type of learner-generated information and content, i.e. inter-group peer online feedback, provided on a wiki writing assignment for an English for Academic P...
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Liao Jianling (ASU: Arizona State University)
Abstract Framed within relevant interactionist and sociocultural principles, this study investigates the effects of two forms of pre-task pair planning on individual L2 Chinese composition writing: face-to-face oral discussion and online text-chat. Six intermediate L2 Chinese college learners engaged in ten pair-discussion tasks: five face-to-face oral discussion tasks and five online text-chat tasks. Upon completing each interactive task, learners wrote a composition independently on the topic ...
Published on Aug 1, 2018in Adult learning
Laurie A. Sharp1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WT: West Texas A&M University),
Brigette Whaley1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WT: West Texas A&M University)
Online learning has become an established and customary way for adults to learn. Adult educators are challenged with promoting learner engagement through online collaborative teaching practices, such as wiki-based learning experiences. Although much literature was available regarding use of wikis to promote writing processes among adults, little literature was available that explored how use of wikis promotes the thinking that occurs prior to writing. This study used a convergent parallel mixed ...
Published on Jun 1, 2018in System1.93
Kim McDonough10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Concordia University),
Jindarat De Vleeschauwer3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CMU: Chiang Mai University),
William J. Crawford4
Estimated H-index: 4
(NAU: Northern Arizona University)
Abstract Although previous studies have compared the quality of collaborative writing texts to those written individually without any peer interaction, studies to date have not explored whether collaborative prewriting affords any of the same benefits of collaborative writing. Situated within the collaborative writing research, this study compares the text features and analytic ratings of paragraphs written by EFL students ( N = 128) at a university in Thailand under three conditions: collaborat...