Preparing medical students for the world: service learning and global health justice.

Published on Jan 1, 2008in The Medscape Journal of Medicine
Kayhan Parsi7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Justin M. List4
Estimated H-index: 4
Abstract
In this article, we discuss the growth of international service learning in undergraduate medical education and tie it to a burgeoning interest among students and educators in global health justice. The process of experience, reflection, and action is the cornerstone of cultivating a sense of social justice among students. Finally, we examine both risks and benefits to international service learning for medical students. We define “service learning,” distinguish it from service and volunteerism, and offer praxis as a manifestation of professionalism.
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Cited By37
Teresa C. Fitts1
Estimated H-index: 1
Service-Learning provides students, faculty and community partners an opportunity to go beyond classroom and laboratory instruction to the application of theoretical principles, and the development of civic responsibility by forging meaningful relationships with community partners. Service-learning also enables faculty to broaden the cultural sensitivity and international exposure of students by engaging students in directed, purposeful projects aimed at supporting the goals of both the college ...
2 Citations
Anna Domina , Joy Doll4
Estimated H-index: 4
International Service-Learning (ISL) acts as a pedagogy that can help health professions students identify the importance and relevance of providing care based on the principle of social justice. Beyond building entry level practice skills, health care educators in higher education have a role to ensure that health professions students have a strong sense of justice and are able to engage in critically conscious practice. Critical consciousness, identified by Paulo Freire, can aid health profess...
Published on Oct 1, 2011in Clinical and Investigative Medicine 0.83
Andrew Boozary1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Sagar Dugani1
Estimated H-index: 1
The World Health Organization (WHO) defines health as a “resource for everyday living, not the objective of living”; however, worldwide, there remains an unmistakable inequity in level of health and access to healthcare. The WHO has published documents on financing health systems towards universal health coverage [1], promoting healthy life [2], improving performance of health systems [3], and enriching humanity [4], highlighting our shared responsibility towards improving both national and glob...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2013in Journal of Cancer Education 1.55
Lisa Kennedy Sheldon6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Massachusetts Boston),
Barbara Wise1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Food and Drug Administration)
+ 3 AuthorsJose Angel Sanchez1
Estimated H-index: 1
The present paper is a longitudinal study which aims to develop and deliver cancer nursing education conferences in Honduras using volunteer nurse educators. This program intends to (1) perform site assessments of work environments and resources for cancer care in Honduras, (2) develop cancer nursing education programs, (3) survey conference participants continuing education needs, (4) deliver cancer nursing education conferences, and (5) share data with local and global partners for future canc...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Medical Education Online 1.44
Christopher P. Morley19
Estimated H-index: 19
(State University of New York Upstate Medical University),
Carrie Roseamelia3
Estimated H-index: 3
(State University of New York Upstate Medical University)
+ 1 AuthorsAna L. Villarreal1
Estimated H-index: 1
(State University of New York Upstate Medical University)
Background : Idealism declines in medical students over the course of training, with some studies identifying the beginning of the decline in year 3 of US curricula. Purposes : This study tested the hypothesis that a decline in medical student idealism is detectable in the first two years of medical school. Methods : We sought to identify differences in survey responses between first-year (MS1) and second-year (MS2) medical students at the beginning (T1) and end (T2) of academic year 2010 on thr...
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2015in BMC Medical Education 1.51
William Ventres10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of El Salvador),
Calvin L Wilson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Colorado Boulder)
Background Health professionals from high-income countries are increasingly becoming involved in international service-learning trips in low and low/middle-income countries. While much has been written about the ethics and curricular guidelines related to such endeavors, scant attention has been paid to the attitudes with which trainees and clinicians enter into or return from them. In this essay the authors explore how attitudes contribute to the success or failure of international service-lear...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Medical Education Online 1.44
Mark Stoltenberg1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Loyola University Chicago),
Natalia Rumas1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Loyola University Chicago),
Kayhan Parsi7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Loyola University Chicago)
Background: Interest in global health is rapidly increasing amongst US medical students. Many students aspire to incorporate global health into their future careers, while others seek international opportunities to better prepare themselves for domestic practice. US medical schools have begun responding to this burgeoning interest with varying intensity and through a number of different strategies. Conclusions: Three important themes involved include: increasing the academic rigor of programming...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2013in Journal of Community Health 1.53
Mellissa Withers9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of California, Los Angeles),
C. H. Browner28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of California, Los Angeles),
Tara Aghaloo27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of California, Los Angeles)
The challenges of meeting global health care needs in communities throughout the developing world are becoming increasingly complex. Understanding what motivates volunteers is important for organizations that seek to harness and develop long-term volunteers in order to meet the need for global health care services. Here we report a case study of a successful volunteer clinic that has provided medical, dental and surgical services to under-served residents of northern Mexico for more than 20 year...
22 Citations Source Cite
William Ventres10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Geoff Gusoff1
Estimated H-index: 1
Despite the historical and social significance of poverty, scholars from varied ideological and philosophical disciplines have often observed that its most notable feature is its invisibility. We suggest that poverty is not excluded from view, but rather from consciousness. This lack of consciousness is due to a subjective “poverty blindness” on the part of those who fail to take the poor into account. In this article we explore this new concept of “Poverty Blindness” (PB) using a clinical appro...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2011in Journal of Cancer Education 1.55
Leslie Sheu10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of California),
Patricia Zheng6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of California)
+ 5 AuthorsCindy J. Lai12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of California)
Student-run clinics (SRCs) are widespread, but studies on their educational impact are limited. We surveyed preclinical medical, nursing, and pharmacy students about their experiences in a hepatitis B elective which provided opportunities to they could volunteer at hepatitis B screening and vaccination SRCs. Student responses revealed positive perceptions of the volunteer experience. Benefits included interacting with patients, developing clinical skills, providing service to disadvantaged popul...
37 Citations Source Cite