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What Can Developmental Theory Contribute to Elementary Science Instruction

Published on Sep 1, 2008in Journal of Elementary Science Education
· DOI :10.1007/BF03173673
Anton E. Lawson41
Estimated H-index: 41
(ASU: Arizona State University)
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Abstract
Children personally construct explanations of natural phenomena, some of which differ from currently accepted scientific explanations. The replacement of personal explanations with scientific explanations, as well as the development of concrete, formal, and post-formal reasoning patterns, requires self-regulation in which alternative explanations are generated and tested in a hypothetico-predictive fashion. Consequently, inquiry-based science instruction in which students explore nature; encounter puzzling observations; and, subsequently, generate and test their own explanations not only helps them acquire meaningful concepts, it also helps them develop intellectually and become scientifically literate.
  • References (21)
  • Citations (4)
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References21
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2008in Journal of Elementary Science Education
Edmund A. Marek16
Estimated H-index: 16
(OU: University of Oklahoma)
The learning cycle is a way to structure inquiry in school science and occurs in several sequential phases. A learning cycle moves children through a scientific investigation by having them first explore materials, then construct a concept, and finally apply or extend the concept to other situations. Why the learning cycle? Because it is a theory-based design for inquiry that works when implemented well.
Published on Jan 1, 2006
William Damon31
Estimated H-index: 31
,
Richard M. Lerner76
Estimated H-index: 76
VOLUME 1. 1. Developmental Science, Developmental Systems, and Contemporary Theories of Human Development (Richard M. Lerner). 2. Developmental Psychology: Philosophy, Concepts, Methodology (Willis F. Overton). 3. The Making of Developmental Psychology (Robert B. Cairns and Beverley D. Cairns). 4. Developmental Epistemology and Implications for Methodology (Jaan Valsiner). 5. The Significance of Biology for Human Development: A Developmental Psychobiological Systems Views (Gilbert Gottlieb, Doug...
Published on Jun 21, 2001in Nature43.07
Jonathan D. Wallis34
Estimated H-index: 34
(MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology),
Kathleen C. Anderson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology),
Earl K. Miller62
Estimated H-index: 62
(MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
The ability to abstract principles or rules from direct experience allows behaviour to extend beyond specific circumstances to general situations. For example, we learn the ‘rules’ for restaurant dining from specific experiences and can then apply them in new restaurants. The use of such rules is thought to depend on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) because its damage often results in difficulty in following rules1. Here we explore its neural basis by recording from single neurons in the PFC of monke...
Published on Apr 1, 2000in American Biology Teacher0.28
Anton E. Lawson41
Estimated H-index: 41
,
Nicole Drake1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsChristopher Scarpone1
Estimated H-index: 1
THE purpose of the present study is to test the hypothesis that a fifth stage of intellectual development characterized by the ability to test alternative explanations involving unseen theoretical entities exists. This fifth-stage hypothesis will be tested in the context of a nonmajors, college-level biology course in which the assumption is made that some, but by no means all, students have acquired stage-five reasoning skills. Jean Piaget’s well-known developmental theory proposes that the dev...
Published on Jan 1, 2000in Journal of Research in Science Teaching3.13
Anton E. Lawson41
Estimated H-index: 41
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Brian R. Clark4
Estimated H-index: 4
(ASU: Arizona State University)
+ 3 AuthorsYong-Ju Kwon5
Estimated H-index: 5
(POSTECH: Pohang University of Science and Technology)
The primary purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that two general developmentally based levels of hypothesis-testing skills exist. The first hypothesized level presumably involves skills associated with testing hypotheses about observable causal agents; the second presumably involves skills associated with testing hypotheses involving unobservable entities. To test this hypothesis, a hypothesis-testing skills test was developed and administered to a large sample of college stu...
Published on Jan 1, 2000in American Scientist0.51
Marc Hauser1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Jan 1, 1998
David Moshman17
Estimated H-index: 17
(NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)
Published on Nov 1, 1993in Journal of Research in Science Teaching3.13
Anton E. Lawson41
Estimated H-index: 41
(ASU: Arizona State University)
The present study tested the alternative hypotheses that the poor performance of the intuitive and transitional students on the concept acquisition tasks employed in the Lawson et al. (1991) study was due either to their failure (a) to use deductive reasoning to test potentially relevant task features, as suggested by Lawson et al. (1991); (b) to identify potentially relevant features; or (c) to derive and test a successful problem-solving strategy. To test these hypotheses a training session, w...
Published on Jan 1, 1992
Stephen M. Kosslyn84
Estimated H-index: 84
Drawing on recent research in neurobiology, artificial intelligence, cognitive science and medicine, this book provides a comprehensive overview of the functions and dysfunctions of the brain. It also explains the fundamental concepts behind, and the key discoveries that draw on, neural network computing models, various brain-scanning techniques, neurophysiological studies of animals, behavioural studies, and studies of neurological patients. Throughout, the authors illustrate their points with ...
Published on Jan 1, 1991in Developmental Neuropsychology1.34
Robert W. Thatcher4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)
The issue of continuous versus discontinuous cognitive development was evaluated in terms of the nonlinear dynamics of human cerebral maturation. Convergent evidence from studies of the development of cerebral architecture, the development of EEG relative power, and the development of EEG coherence demonstrate oscillations and equilibrium processes that underlay cerebral maturation. Life‐span development was shown to be a “wave” process with spectral characteristics determined by anatomy. The fr...
Cited By4
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2017 in HICSS (Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences)
Noel Enyedy17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
Joshua A. Danish9
Estimated H-index: 9
(IU: Indiana University)
+ 4 AuthorsRandy Illum1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)
Mariann M. Manno5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Allison Rook2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 3 AuthorsMichael P. Hirsh10
Estimated H-index: 10
BACKGROUND: : To assess the effectiveness of a mobile injury prevention vehicle (mobile safety street [MSS]) with a hands-on curriculum on instruction and retention of safety knowledge compared with traditional classroom safety curriculum among grade 5 elementary school children. METHODS: : Grade 5 students (n = 1,692) were asked to participate in the study as either the intervention group (MSS experience) or the comparison group (traditional classroom safety curriculum). Each student in the int...
Published on Jul 23, 2008in Journal of Science Teacher Education
Edmund A. Marek16
Estimated H-index: 16
(OU: University of Oklahoma),
Steven J. Maier2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Northwestern Oklahoma State University),
Florence McCann2
Estimated H-index: 2
(OU: University of Oklahoma)
An 18-item, multiple choice, 2-tiered instrument designed to measure understanding of the learning cycle (ULC) was developed and field-tested from the learning cycle test (LCT) of Odom and Settlage (Journal of Science Teacher Education, 7, 123–142, 1996). All question sets of the LCT were modified to some degree and 5 new sets were added, resulting in the ULC. The ULC measures (a) understandings and misunderstandings of the learning cycle, (b) the learning cycle’s association with Piaget’s (Biol...
Published on Apr 1, 2008in Journal of Elementary Science Education
Edmund A. Marek16
Estimated H-index: 16
(OU: University of Oklahoma)
The learning cycle is a way to structure inquiry in school science and occurs in several sequential phases. A learning cycle moves children through a scientific investigation by having them first explore materials, then construct a concept, and finally apply or extend the concept to other situations. Why the learning cycle? Because it is a theory-based design for inquiry that works when implemented well.