Match!

Mysis nordenskioldi n. sp. (Crustacea, Mysida), a circumpolar coastal mysid separated from the NE Pacific M. litoralis (Banner, 1948)

Published on Jul 9, 2007in Polar Biology2.00
· DOI :10.1007/s00300-007-0271-5
Asta Audzijonyte15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UH: University of Helsinki),
Risto VINOlLA27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UH: University of Helsinki)
Cite
Abstract
Mysis nordenskioldi n. sp. is a circumpolar, arctic-subarctic coastal mysid crustacean, earlier considered conspecific with M. litoralis (Banner, 1948) and in the past also confused with the circumpolar M. oculata (Fabricius, 1780). Mysis litoralis itself seems to be restricted to the northeastern North Pacific. Formal diagnoses and descriptions of the three species are here given based on morphological and molecular characters (allozymes, mtDNA). The species are morphologically distinguished by features of the telson and by the setation of maxillae and maxillipedes. Molecular differences diagnosing M. nordenskioldi from the two others were found at seven to eight allozyme loci, while M. oculata and M. litoralis differed from each other at five loci. In mitochondrial DNA, M. nordenskioldi is distinguished from the others by 8% nucleotide divergence, whereas M. litoralis and M. oculata make an inseparable cluster (<1%), suggesting post-speciation mitochondrial introgression. Initial phylogeographic data on M. nordenskioldi and M. oculata are presented. A morphological key to marine Mysis species is given.
  • References (25)
  • Citations (6)
Cite
References25
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2007in Evolution3.57
Raisa Nikula12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UH: University of Helsinki),
Petr Strelkov12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UH: University of Helsinki),
Risto VINOlLA27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UH: University of Helsinki)
Abstract The history of repeated inter- or transoceanic invasions in bivalve mollusks of the circumpolar Macoma balthica complex was assessed from mtDNA COIII sequences. The data suggest that four independent trans-Arctic invasions, from the Pacific, gave rise to the current lineage diversity in the North Atlantic. Unlike in many other prominent North Atlantic littoral taxa, no evidence for (postinvasion) trans-Atlantic connections was found in the M. balthica complex. The earliest branch of the...
Published on Oct 1, 2006in Molecular Ecology5.86
Asta Audzijonyte15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UH: University of Helsinki),
Risto VINOlLA27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UH: University of Helsinki)
Phylogeographic structures of two weakly dispersing Mysis sibling species, one with a circumarctic coastal, the other with a boreal lacustrine-Baltic distribution, were studied from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequences. Mysis segerstralei showed high overall diversity and little phylogeographic structure across the Arctic, indicating late-glacial dispersal among coastal and lake populations from Alaska, Siberia and the north of Europe. A strongly divergent refugial l...
Published on Dec 1, 2005in Cladistics7.78
Asta Audzijonyte15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UH: University of Helsinki),
Jakob Damgaard17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
+ 2 AuthorsRisto VINOlLA27
Estimated H-index: 27
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
We studied the phylogenetic history of opossum shrimps of the genus Mysis Latreille, 1802 (Crustacea: Mysida) using parsimony analyses of morphological characters, DNA sequence data from mitochondrial (16S, COI and CytB) and nuclear genes (ITS2, 18S), and eight allozyme loci. With these data we aimed to resolve a long-debated question of the origin of the non-marine (continental) taxa in the genus, i.e., “glacial relicts” in circumpolar postglacial lakes and “arctic immigrants” in the Caspian Se...
Published on Sep 1, 2005in Journal of Fish Biology2.04
A. A. Makhrov9
Estimated H-index: 9
(RAS: Russian Academy of Sciences),
E. Verspoor32
Estimated H-index: 32
+ 1 AuthorsM. O'sullivan3
Estimated H-index: 3
Previous studies of the ESTD* isozyme locus in the Atlantic salmon show the *80 allele to be absent across the species' European range, with the exception of northern Russia, whereas the allele is nearly fixed in North American populations. The allele was found in samples from 15 out of 18 rivers on the Kola Peninsula and White sea coast and had frequencies that ranged from 0.017 to 0.363. Typing of fish in nine of these rivers for mtDNA variation in the ND1 gene region found variation character...
Published on Aug 1, 2005in Hydrobiologia2.33
Asta Audzijonytė2
Estimated H-index: 2
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History),
Risto VINOlLA27
Estimated H-index: 27
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
Mysid crustaceans of the Mysis relicta species group are widespread throughout the northern Holarctic and play an important role in many fresh- and brackish-water ecosystems. Earlier molecular and morphometric studies already indicated that the conventionally identified Mysis relicta sensu lato comprises several distinct species. Here we present formal taxonomic diagnoses, descriptions and an account of the distributions of Mysis relicta s. str. and three new species split from it, based on comp...
Published on Jan 1, 2005in Russian Journal of Marine Biology0.49
V. V. Petryashev3
Estimated H-index: 3
(RAS: Russian Academy of Sciences)
A biogeographical analysis of the North Pacific temperate waters is made on the basis of the distribution of 88 species of Mysidacea (Crustacea) and 111 species of Anomura (Crustacea: Decapoda: Reptantia) inhabiting depths from 0 to 1000–12000 m. At depths from 0 to 180–200 m and from 180–200 to 1000–1200 m, division by mysid fauna is made separately; division according to anomurans is unified. Original schemes of faunistic zonation of the North Pacific are given. The influence of abiotic factor...
Published on Nov 1, 2003in Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics10.88
Daniel J. Funk25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University),
Kevin E. Omland16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
▪ Abstract Many uses of gene trees implicitly assume that nominal species are monophyletic in their alleles at the study locus. However, in well-sampled gene trees, certain alleles in one species may appear more closely related to alleles from different species than to other conspecific alleles. Such deviations from species-level monophyly have a variety of causes and may lead to erroneous evolutionary interpretations if undetected. The present paper describes the causes and consequences of thes...
Published on Aug 7, 2003
Paul D. N. Hebert89
Estimated H-index: 89
(U of G: University of Guelph),
Sujeevan Ratnasingham15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Jeremy R. deWaard20
Estimated H-index: 20
With millions of species and their life-stage transformations, the animal kingdom provides a challenging target for taxonomy. Recent work has suggested that a DNA-based identification system, founded on the mitochondrial gene, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI), can aid the resolution of this diversity. While past work has validated the ability of COI sequences to diagnose species in certain taxonomic groups, the present study extends these analyses across the animal kingdom. The results indic...
Published on Jan 1, 2003
Apparatus for cleaning an adhesive applicator roll includes a plurality of air jets for directing an air stream against the roll to clean the same. A driven roller assembly rotates the roll as it is being cleaned by the jets.
Published on Jan 1, 2000
Masatoshi Nei108
Estimated H-index: 108
,
Sudhir Kumar63
Estimated H-index: 63
1. Molecular basis of evolution 2. Evolutionary changes of amino acid sequences 3. Evolutionary changes of DNA sequences 4. Synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions 5. Phylogenetic trees 6. Phylogenetic inference: Distance methods 7. Phylogenetic inference: Maximum parsimony methods 8. Phylogenetic inference: Maximum likelihood methods 9. Accuracies and statistical tests of phylogenetic trees 10. Molecular clocks and linearized trees 11. Ancestral nucleotide and amino acid sequences...
Cited By6
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2016
D. Christopher Rogers13
Estimated H-index: 13
(KU: University of Kansas)
Published on Jul 10, 2015in PLOS ONE2.78
Alexander L. Vereshchaka6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Shirshov Institute of Oceanology),
Dmitry N. Kulagin3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Shirshov Institute of Oceanology),
Anastasia A. Lunina6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Shirshov Institute of Oceanology)
The paper addresses the phylogeny and classification of the hydrothermal vent shrimp family Alvinocarididae. Two morphological cladistic analyses were carried out, which use all 31 recognized species of Alvinocarididae as terminal taxa. As outgroups, two species were included, both representing major caridean clades: Acanthephyra purpurea (Acanthephyridae) and Alpheus echiurophilus (Alpheidae). For additional support of the clades we utilised available data on mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase ...
Published on Nov 1, 2013in Journal of Avian Biology2.23
Jennifer F. Provencher14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Carleton University),
Kyle Hamish Elliott2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Carleton University)
+ 1 AuthorsBirgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University)
Generalist predator populations are sometimes made up of individuals that specialize on particular prey items. To examine specialization in thick-billed murres Uria lomvia during self-feeding we obtained stomach contents and muscle stable isotope values for 213 birds feeding close to five colonies in the Canadian Arctic. Adults were less specialized during self-feeding than during chick-provisioning. Nonetheless, particular specialists clustered together within the foraging network. While sexes ...
Published on May 21, 2012in Marine Ecology Progress Series2.36
Jennifer F. Provencher14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UVic: University of Victoria),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
+ 1 AuthorsH.G. Gilchrist7
Estimated H-index: 7
Seabird diet indicates changing Arctic marine communities in eastern Canada J. F. Provencher*, A. J. Gaston, P. D. O’Hara, H. G. Gilchrist Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3N5, Canada Science and Technology Branch, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3, Canada Canadian Wildlife Service, Sidney, British Columbia V8L 4B2, Canada
Published on Jan 1, 2010
Supervisory Committee John Dower, Department of Biology Supervisor Patrick O’Hara, Department of Biology Co-Supervisor Steve Insley, Department of Biology Departmental Member Anthony Gaston, Environment Canada Additional Member Climate change has a wide range of effects with the potential to cause broad changes in marine ecosystems. The Arctic is predicted to be one of the most highly impacted areas, with average temperatures increasing by as much as 3-5°C. As temperatures rise, Arctic sea ice i...
Published on Sep 3, 2009in International Journal of Molecular Sciences4.18
Michael L. Arnold1
Estimated H-index: 1
(FSU: Florida State University),
Nicole D. Fogarty9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UGA: University of Georgia)
The role that reticulate evolution (i.e., via lateral transfer, viral recombination and/or introgressive hybridization) has played in the origin and adaptation of individual taxa and even entire clades continues to be tested for all domains of life. Though falsified for some groups, the hypothesis of divergence in the face of gene flow is becoming accepted as a major facilitator of evolutionary change for many microorganisms, plants and animals. Yet, the effect of reticulate evolutionary change ...
View next paperNew Harpacticoida (Crustacea, Copepoda) from the North Atlantic Ocean. V. Three New Species of Metahuntemannia Smirnov (Cletodidae)