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Movements and wintering areas of breeding age Thick-billed Murre Uria lomvia from two colonies in Nunavut, Canada

Published on Sep 1, 2011in Marine Biology2.13
· DOI :10.1007/s00227-011-1704-9
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Carleton University),
Paul A. Smith18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Carleton University)
+ 7 AuthorsRichard A. Phillips47
Estimated H-index: 47
(NERC: Natural Environment Research Council)
Cite
Abstract
The non-breeding movements of marine birds were poorly known until recently, but this information is essential to understanding the risk to different geographical populations from events on the wintering grounds. We tracked the migration routes and wintering areas of Thick-billed Murre Uria lomvia from two breeding colonies in eastern Canada: Coats Island in northern Hudson Bay and The Minarets, Baffin Island, during the period August 2007–May 2008 using geolocation loggers. Birds from The Minarets moved south rapidly post-breeding and wintered principally off Newfoundland and southern Labrador, or between Newfoundland and southern Greenland, remaining south of 55°N until at least the spring equinox. Those from Coats Island remained in Hudson Bay until at least mid-November, after which they moved rapidly through Hudson Strait to winter in southern Davis Strait and the northern Labrador Sea, mostly north of 55°N. Many individuals stayed throughout the winter in areas of heavy ice cover. Adults from the two colonies appear to be completely segregated in winter and those from Coats Island probably did not enter the area of the winter hunt in Newfoundland. Unexpectedly, some birds from The Minarets wintered in waters beyond the continental slope and outside the distribution of pack ice, demonstrating that particular individuals can be wholly pelagic throughout the winter. Coats Island birds returned through Hudson Strait as soon as open water areas became available in spring. Their sojourn in Hudson Bay coincided very closely with the occurrence of areas with <90% ice cover. In spite of the relatively large error in positions obtained from geolocation loggers, our results demonstrated the value of these devices by uncovering a number of previously unknown aspects of Thick-billed Murre non-breeding ecology in the Northwest Atlantic. Comparison of the non-breeding ecology based on SST experienced in winter show that the winter niche is broader than hitherto assumed, demonstrating that separate populations may experience different selection in the face of climate change.
  • References (39)
  • Citations (34)
Cite
References39
Newest
Jérôme Fort18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique),
Warren P. Porter38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison),
David Grémillet46
Estimated H-index: 46
(UCT: University of Cape Town)
article i nfo Studying energetics of marine top predators is essential to understand their role within food-webs and mechanisms associated with their survival and population dynamics. Several methods exist to estimate energy expenditure in captive and free-ranging animals. However, most of them are difficult to implement, restrained to specific periods, and are consequently inappropriate for seabirds. Supplementary and complementary approaches are therefore needed, and the use of modelling appea...
Published on Apr 1, 2010in Marine Biology2.13
M. P. Harris47
Estimated H-index: 47
,
Francis Daunt37
Estimated H-index: 37
+ 2 AuthorsSarah Wanless59
Estimated H-index: 59
Most seabirds die outside the breeding season, but understanding the key factors involved is hampered by limited knowledge of nonbreeding distributions. We used miniature geolocating loggers to examine the movements between breeding seasons of Atlantic puffins Fratercula arctica from a major North Sea colony where numbers have declined in recent years, apparently due to increased overwinter mortality. The most intensively used region was the northwestern North Sea but most puffins also made excu...
Published on Mar 1, 2010in Wildlife Biology1.34
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
,
Gregory J. Robertson28
Estimated H-index: 28
Abstract The harvest of Brunnich's guillemots (thick-billed murres) Uria lomvia off Newfoundland and Labrador is the only legal hunt of seabirds by non-natives in Canada and the United States. Ringing programmes at Arctic breeding colonies have been used to track changes in numbers and age composition of harvested birds. In recent years, the numbers of rings reported by hunters have fallen steeply. We examined recoveries by hunters of rings from a colony in northern Hudson Bay during 1984-2006 t...
Published on Jan 29, 2010in Arctic1.43
Vid Ar Bakken1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Fridtjof Mehlum22
Estimated H-index: 22
We mapped wintering areas and estimated the recovery rates of Brunnich’s guillemots (thick-billed murres) ringed in Svalbard during 1954–98. Recoveries were reported from Iceland, Greenland, and Newfoundland. An intensive hunt occurs annually off Greenland and Newfoundland, and more than 95% of the recovered birds were reported as shot. Birds recovered as immatures differed from birds recovered as adults in their temporal and spatial distribution. Immatures were more exposed to hunting because t...
Published on Jan 1, 2010
Erica H. Dunn1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Aug 1, 2009in The Journal of Experimental Biology3.02
Jérôme Fort18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Warren P. Porter38
Estimated H-index: 38
,
David Grémillet46
Estimated H-index: 46
Studying the energetics of marine top predators such as seabirds is essential to understand processes underlying adult winter survival and its impact on population dynamics. Winter survival is believed to be the single most important life-history trait in long-lived species but its determinants are largely unknown. Seabirds are inaccessible during this season, so conventional metabolic studies are extremely challenging and new approaches are needed. This paper describes and uses a state-of-the-a...
Published on Apr 7, 2009
Tim Guilford36
Estimated H-index: 36
,
Jessica Meade13
Estimated H-index: 13
+ 6 AuthorsChristopher M. Perrins34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Edward Grey Institute of Field Ornithology)
The migratory movements of seabirds (especially smaller species) remain poorly understood, despite their role as harvesters of marine ecosystems on a global scale and their potential as indicators of ocean health. Here we report a successful attempt, using miniature archival light loggers (geolocators), to elucidate the migratory behaviour of the Manx shearwater Puffinus puffinus , a small (400 g) Northern Hemisphere breeding procellariform that undertakes a trans-equatorial, trans-Atlantic migr...
Published on Feb 13, 2009in Science41.04
Bridget J. M. Stutchbury35
Estimated H-index: 35
(York University),
Scott A. Tarof5
Estimated H-index: 5
(York University)
+ 5 AuthorsVsevolod Afanasyev28
Estimated H-index: 28
(NERC: Natural Environment Research Council)
We mapped migration routes of migratory songbirds to the Neotropics by using light-level geolocators mounted on breeding purple martins (Progne subis) and wood thrushes (Hylocichla mustelina). Wood thrushes from the same breeding population occupied winter territories within a narrow east-west band in Central America, suggesting high connectivity of breeding and wintering populations. Pace of spring migration was rapid (233 to 577 kilometers/day) except for one individual (159 kilometers/day) wh...
Published on Sep 13, 2007in Marine Ecology Progress Series2.36
Richard A. Phillips47
Estimated H-index: 47
(BAS: British Antarctic Survey),
Paulo Catry29
Estimated H-index: 29
+ 4 AuthorsIan J. Strange16
Estimated H-index: 16
In the first published study of the wintering ranges and activity patterns of skuas from any colony, we combined tracking (geolocator) and stable isotope analysis in a comparison of migra- tion behaviour of brown skuas Catharacta lonnbergi and Falkland skuas C. antarctica from South Georgia and the Falkland Islands, respectively. Brown skuas, particularly failed breeders, departed and returned to the colony much earlier than Falkland skuas, and 2 of 3 brown skuas performed a pre-laying exodus. D...
Published on Aug 1, 2007in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment10.94
Jacob González-Solís36
Estimated H-index: 36
(University of Barcelona),
John P. Croxall34
Estimated H-index: 34
(NERC: Natural Environment Research Council)
+ 1 AuthorsXavier Ruiz29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Barcelona)
Despite increasing interest in long-distance migration, the wintering areas, migration corridors, and population mix in winter quarters of most pelagic marine predators are unknown. Here, we present the first study tracking migration movements of shearwaters through the non-breeding period. We used geolocators (global location sensing [GLS] units based on ambient light levels) to track 22 Cory's shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) breeding in three different areas. Most birds wintered in one or m...
Cited By34
Newest
Published on Oct 16, 2018in Environmental Reviews3.96
Mark L. Mallory3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Acadia University),
Anthony J. Gaston43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Carleton University)
+ 9 AuthorsAllison Patterson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(McGill University)
The Canadian Arctic hosts millions of marine birds annually, many of which aggregate in large numbers at well-defined sites at predictable times of the year. Marine habitats in this region will be ...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Diversity and Distributions4.09
David J. Yurkowski10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Marie Auger-Méthé11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
+ 37 AuthorsMarianne Marcoux11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Fisheries and Oceans Canada)
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Ocean & Coastal Management2.60
Sarah N. P. Wong1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Acadia University),
Carina Gjerdrum11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CWS: Canadian Wildlife Service)
+ 1 AuthorsMark L. Mallory3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Acadia University)
Abstract Millions of seabirds use the waters off Baffin Island. Considering current and future vessel activity in this region, it is important to understand where vulnerability to anthropogenic threats is highest to enable sound wildlife management and regulatory decisions. Using kernel density analysis on at-sea survey data spanning 1970 to 1983 and 2007 to 2016, we identified marine areas of high density for five of the most abundant species sighted: Dovekie Alle alle, Thick-billed Murre Uria ...
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Journal of Environmental Sciences-china3.56
Mark L. Mallory18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Acadia University),
Birgit M. Braune34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Carleton University)
Mercury (Hg) remains a key contaminant of concern in Arctic biota, and monitoring of Hg concentrations in seabird tissues will be an effective approach to track the effects of implementing the Minamata Convention. We examined trends in total Hg (THg) in liver and egg tissues of two Arctic seabirds, thick-billed murres ( Uria lomvia ) and northern fulmars ( Fulmarus glacialis ), between 1976 and 2013 to assess whether both tissues showed similar patterns of Hg change. Hepatic THg was consistently...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Ecology and Evolution2.42
Anna Tigano5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Queen's University),
Allison J. Shultz9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Harvard University)
+ 2 AuthorsVicki L. Friesen31
Estimated H-index: 31
(Queen's University)
Investigating the extent (or the existence) of local adaptation is crucial to understanding how populations adapt. When experiments or fitness measurements are difficult or impossible to perform in natural populations, genomic techniques allow us to investigate local adaptation through the comparison of allele frequencies and outlier loci along environmental clines. The thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia) is a highly philopatric colonial arctic seabird that occupies a significant environmental grad...
Published on Feb 17, 2017in Marine Ecology Progress Series2.36
Marie Auger-Méthé11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Dal: Dalhousie University),
Christoffer Moesgaard Albertsen7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 6 AuthorsJ. Mills Flemming17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Dal: Dalhousie University)
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Biological Conservation4.45
Morten Frederiksen32
Estimated H-index: 32
(AU: Aarhus University),
Sébastien Descamps17
Estimated H-index: 17
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
+ 16 AuthorsMark L. Mallory18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Acadia University)
Pelagic seabirds are exposed to an array of potential threats during the non-breeding period, and effective management of these threats on a large scale requires knowledge of which populations winter where. Thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) are emblematic of this conservation challenge, since they breed widely in the circumpolar Arctic, with many declining populations in the Atlantic. Threats facing murres include hunting, oil spills, bycatch and oceanic change influencing prey availability. Pre...
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Bird Conservation International1.73
Flemming Merkel16
Estimated H-index: 16
(AU: Aarhus University),
David Boertmann18
Estimated H-index: 18
(AU: Aarhus University)
+ 6 AuthorsChristian Sonne41
Estimated H-index: 41
(AU: Aarhus University)
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Frontiers in Marine Science
Sarah E. Gutowsky3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Dal: Dalhousie University),
Marty L. Leonard33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Dal: Dalhousie University)
+ 2 AuthorsIan D. Jonsen27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Macquarie University)
Marine ecologists and managers need to know the spatial extent of at-sea areas most frequented by the groups of wildlife they study or manage. Defining group-specific ranges and distributions (i.e. space use at the level of species, population, age-class, etc.) can help to identify the source or severity of common or distinct threats among different at-risk groups. In biologging studies, this is accomplished by estimating the space use of a group based on a sample of tracked individuals. A major...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Journal of Animal Ecology4.36
Rachael A. Orben9
Estimated H-index: 9
(OSU: Oregon State University),
Rosana Paredes13
Estimated H-index: 13
(OSU: Oregon State University)
+ 2 AuthorsScott A. Shaffer33
Estimated H-index: 33
(SJSU: San Jose State University)
Summary Foraging and migration often require different energetic and movement strategies. Though not readily apparent, constraints during one phase might influence the foraging strategies observed in another. For marine birds that fly and dive, body size constraints likely present a trade-off between foraging ability and migration as smaller bodies reduce flight costs, whereas larger bodies are advantageous for diving deeper. This study examines individual wintering strategies of deep diving thi...
View next paperMultiple-colony winter habitat use by murres Uria spp. in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean: implications for marine risk assessment