Match!

Do Different Work Characteristics Have Different Distributional Impacts on Job Satisfaction? A Study of Slope Heterogeneity in Workers’ Well‐Being

Published on Sep 1, 2014in British Journal of Industrial Relations1.98
· DOI :10.1111/j.1467-8543.2012.00904.x
Aekapol Chongvilaivan6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Nattavudh Powdthavee22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Melbourne)
Cite
Abstract
This article is an empirical study of slope heterogeneity in job satisfaction. It provides evidence from the generalized ordered probit models that different job characteristics tend to have different distributional impacts on the overall job satisfaction. For instance, standard models tend to significantly underestimate the effects of monthly salary and hours worked at generating the ‘highly’ satisfied workers, while lowering the incidence of the ‘very dissatisfied’ workers. Although our results should be viewed as illustrative, we provide discussions of their potential implications for employers and on how they could help with the design of employment contracts.
  • References (14)
  • Citations (8)
Cite
References14
Newest
Published on May 1, 2015in Economics Letters0.88
Kausik Chaudhuri12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Leeds),
Kevin T. Reilly6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Leeds),
David A. Spencer13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Leeds)
This paper examines the effects of age and tenure on job satisfaction. We estimate a generalized dynamic random effects ordered probit model using the British Household Panel Survey. Contrary to previous literature, we find that age has no significant impact on job satisfaction for females, and a limited impact for males who report higher levels of job satisfaction. We also find that tenure shares a non-monotonic relationship with job satisfaction for females. For males, the same result is found...
Published on Aug 1, 2013in Journal of Socio-economics
Leonardo Becchetti27
Estimated H-index: 27
,
Stefano Castriota11
Estimated H-index: 11
+ 1 AuthorsElena Giachin Ricca4
Estimated H-index: 4
Our paper provides some novel evidence on the burgeoning literature on life satisfaction and relative comparisons by showing that in the last 30 years comparisons with the wellbeing of top income countries have generated progressively more negative feelings on a large sample of individuals in the Eurobarometer survey. The paper contributes in two main directions: (i) it shows that countries, and not just neighbors, can be reference groups; (ii) it documents a globalization effect by which distan...
Published on Sep 1, 2011in Journal of Health Economics3.35
Nattavudh Powdthavee22
Estimated H-index: 22
(NTU: Nanyang Technological University),
Bernard van den Berg16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Ebor: University of York)
Many recent writings in health policy have proposed that health be valued directly and in monetary terms using the new well-being valuation method. Yet there is no clear consensus on what the best measure of individual's experience may be for the evaluation process. To shed light on this issue, monetary values for a number of health problems are compared across different well-being measures within the same UK data set. We find that, whilst there is strong internal consistency of health impacts w...
Published on Aug 8, 2011
Nattavudh Powdthavee22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Warw.: University of Warwick)
This paper tests whether there is a potential payoff to grandparenthood in terms of life satisfaction. Using the new nationwide survey for the UK, which consists of over 5,000 grandparents and 6,000 non-grandparents aged 40 and above, and a flexible multiple-index ordered probit model with varying thresholds, we find that being a grandparent to at least one grandchild is associated positively and statistically significantly with individuals reporting to be very satisfied with life overall. Paren...
Published on Aug 1, 2011in The Review of Economics and Statistics3.64
Gabriella Conti16
Estimated H-index: 16
(U of C: University of Chicago),
Stephen Pudney23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Essex)
We analyze the effect of survey design on reported job satisfaction by exploiting two quasi-experiments in the British Household Panel Survey: a change in question design and parallel use of different interview modes. We show that apparently minor differences in survey design lead to substantial biases in econometric results, particularly on gender differences. The common empirical finding that women care less about wages and prefer to work fewer hours than men appears largely an artifact of sur...
Published on Mar 1, 2011in Health Economics2.03
Emmanouil Mentzakis11
Estimated H-index: 11
(McMaster University)
Recent research on ‘happiness’ regression equations has shown how monetary values can be put on the well-being effects of many life events (like health problems, marriage or the death of a spouse). Potentially, such work has practical implications for policy‐makers and the courts. However, this article argues that we need to be careful in such work to use the appropriate statistical method. It goes beyond previous research and allows for heterogeneity in the subjective well‐being scales. Using l...
Published on Jan 1, 2010in Social Indicators Research1.70
Stefan Boes9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Rainer Winkelmann36
Estimated H-index: 36
(UZH: University of Zurich)
Increasing evidence from the empirical economic and psychological literature suggests that positive and negative well-being are more than opposite ends of the same phenomenon. Two separate measures of the dependent variable may therefore be needed when analyzing the determinants of subjective well-being. We investigate asymmetries in the effect of income on subjective well-being with a single-item measure of general life satisfaction. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel 1984–2004, an...
Published on Mar 1, 2006in AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis1.05
Stefan Boes9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Rainer Winkelmann36
Estimated H-index: 36
(UZH: University of Zurich)
We discuss regression models for ordered responses, such as ratings of bonds, schooling attainment, or measures of subjective well-being. Commonly used models in this context are the ordered logit and ordered probit regression models. They are based on an underlying latent model with single index function and constant thresholds. We argue that these approaches are overly restrictive and preclude a flexible estimation of the effect of regressors on the discrete outcome probabilities. For example,...
Published on Jun 1, 2005in Journal of Public Economics1.77
Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
Abstract This paper presents an empirical analysis of the importance of ‘comparison income’ for individual well-being or happiness. In other words, the influence of the income of a reference group on individual well-being is examined. The main novelty is that various hypotheses are tested: the importance of the own income, the relevance of the income of the reference group and of the distance between the own income and the income of the reference group, and most importantly the asymmetry of comp...
Published on Mar 1, 2005in The Economic Journal2.93
Andrew E. Clark44
Estimated H-index: 44
(Delta Air Lines),
Fabrice Etilé11
Estimated H-index: 11
(INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique)
+ 2 AuthorsKarine Van der Straeten14
Estimated H-index: 14
(École Polytechnique)
This paper models the relationship between income and reported well-being using latent class techniques applied to panel data from twelve European countries. Introducing both intercept and slope heterogeneity into this relationship, we strongly reject the hypothesis that individuals transform income into well-being in the same way. We show that both individual characteristics and country of residence are strong predictors of the four classes we identify. We expect that differences in the margina...
Cited By8
Newest
Published on 2019in Regional Studies3.07
Chris Hand11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Kingston Business School)
ABSTRACTMultiple studies have identified an urban penalty on, and regional differences in, life satisfaction, but few studies compare the effects of both. This study applies a generalized ordered l...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of International Economics2.22
Italo Colantone7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Bocconi University),
Rosario Crinò12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UCSC: Catholic University of the Sacred Heart)
+ 0 AuthorsLaura Ogliari (University of Milan)
Abstract We study the effects of import competition on workers' mental distress, using unique longitudinal data on mental health for British residents, coupled with measures of import competition in more than 100 industries over 1995–2007. We find that import competition has a large negative impact on individual mental health. Compared to a worker employed in the industry at the 25th percentile of the import competition distribution, a worker employed in the industry at the 75th percentile would...
Published on May 1, 2018in Environmental Science and Pollution Research2.91
Eleftherios Giovanis5
Estimated H-index: 5
(MMU: Manchester Metropolitan University),
Oznur Ozdamar2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Adnan Menderes University)
Environmental quality is an important determinant of individuals’ well-being and one of the main concerns of the governments is the improvement on air quality and the protection of public health. This is especially the case of sensitive demographic groups, such as the old aged people. However, the question this study attempts to answer is how do individuals value the effects on the environment. The study explores the effects of old and early public pension schemes, as well as the impact of air p...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Asian Economic Journal0.20
Aekapol Chongvilaivan6
Estimated H-index: 6
(ADB: Asian Development Bank),
Kiyoshi Taniguchi1
Estimated H-index: 1
(ADB: Asian Development Bank),
Rommel Rabanal (ADB: Asian Development Bank)
type="main"> The impacts of access to roads on subjective well-being at the household level are empirically examined using Timor-Leste's nationally representative surveys. This paper examines not only the quantity, but also the quality of road infrastructure and, thus, extends existing studies that only consider the benefits of road accessibility. It is found that proximity to main roads may not necessarily result in improved welfare. Instead, ensuring all-weather access to roads appears to be a...
Published on May 1, 2015in Economics Letters0.88
Kausik Chaudhuri12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Leeds),
Kevin T. Reilly6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Leeds),
David A. Spencer13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Leeds)
This paper examines the effects of age and tenure on job satisfaction. We estimate a generalized dynamic random effects ordered probit model using the British Household Panel Survey. Contrary to previous literature, we find that age has no significant impact on job satisfaction for females, and a limited impact for males who report higher levels of job satisfaction. We also find that tenure shares a non-monotonic relationship with job satisfaction for females. For males, the same result is found...
Published on Jan 1, 2015
Mark L. Bryan16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Alita Nandi9
Estimated H-index: 9
Following theories of social and economic identity, we use representative data containing measures of personal identity to investigate the interplay of work identity and hours of work in determining subjective wellbeing (job satisfaction, job-related anxiety and depression, and life satisfaction). We find that for a given level of hours, having a stronger work identity is associated with higher wellbeing on most measures. Working long hours is associated with lower wellbeing and working part-tim...
Published on Dec 1, 2013in Journal of Social Research & Policy
Lonnie Golden18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Julia R. Henly14
Estimated H-index: 14
(U of C: University of Chicago),
Susan J. Lambert13
Estimated H-index: 13
(U of C: University of Chicago)
Abstract:This article contributes to knowledge regarding determinants of happiness by examining the independent role played by having discretion over one's working time, using data pooled from two years of a nationally representative US survey. Controlling for a worker's income bracket and work hours duration, having work schedule flexibility in the form of an ability to take time off during the work day and, to a somewhat lesser extent, to vary starting and quitting times daily, are both associ...
Published on Aug 1, 2013in Journal of Socio-economics
Leonardo Becchetti27
Estimated H-index: 27
,
Stefano Castriota11
Estimated H-index: 11
+ 1 AuthorsElena Giachin Ricca4
Estimated H-index: 4
Our paper provides some novel evidence on the burgeoning literature on life satisfaction and relative comparisons by showing that in the last 30 years comparisons with the wellbeing of top income countries have generated progressively more negative feelings on a large sample of individuals in the Eurobarometer survey. The paper contributes in two main directions: (i) it shows that countries, and not just neighbors, can be reference groups; (ii) it documents a globalization effect by which distan...
Published on Aug 1, 2011in The Review of Economics and Statistics3.64
Gabriella Conti16
Estimated H-index: 16
(U of C: University of Chicago),
Stephen Pudney23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Essex)
We analyze the effect of survey design on reported job satisfaction by exploiting two quasi-experiments in the British Household Panel Survey: a change in question design and parallel use of different interview modes. We show that apparently minor differences in survey design lead to substantial biases in econometric results, particularly on gender differences. The common empirical finding that women care less about wages and prefer to work fewer hours than men appears largely an artifact of sur...
View next paperJob satisfaction, wages and allocation of men and women