Discipline-Based Education Research: Understanding and Improving Learning in Undergraduate Science and Engineering

Published on Oct 1, 2013in Journal of Engineering Education 1.98
· DOI :10.1002/jee.20030
Susan RundellSinger16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Carleton College),
Karl A. Smith25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Minnesota)
Abstract
Engineering education research (EER) has been on the fast track since 2004 with an exponential rise in the number of Ph.D.s awarded and the establishment of new programs, even entire EER departments. The National Research Council’s Discipline-Based Education Research (DBER) report (National Research Council, 2012) captures the state-of-the-art advances in our understanding of engineering and science student learning and highlights commonalities with other science-based education research programs. The DBER report is the consensus analysis of experts in undergraduate education research in physics, chemistry, biology, geosciences, astronomy, and engineering. The study committee, chaired by Susan Singer, also included higher education researchers, learning scientists, and cognitive psychologists. A central aspect of the DBER report is the focus on and application of research in the education, learning, and social-behavioral sciences to science and engineering curricula design and teaching methods. Froyd, Wankat, and Smith (2012) identified five major shifts in engineering education in the past 100 years: 1. A shift from hands-on and practical emphasis to engineering science and analytical emphasis 2. A shift to outcomes-based education and accreditation 3. A shift to emphasizing engineering design 4. A shift to applying education, learning, and social-behavioral sciences research 5. A shift to integrating information, computational, and communications technology in education
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References629
Published on Nov 1, 1984in Journal of Geological Education
Ernest L. Kern2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
John R. Carpenter4
Estimated H-index: 4
A low motivational climate is characteristic of many introductory, general-education science courses at the university level. It has been well established that student motivation in a learning experience is, in large part, determined by the affective responses of the students to that experience. To measure the effect of field activities on the affective responses of students in this study, very different approaches were used by the same instructor in teaching two sections of earth science labora...
71 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2005in Journal of geoscience education
Amy C. Englebrecht1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Joel J. Mintzes1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsPaul Kelso4
Estimated H-index: 4
Using concept maps and clinical interviews, we assessed the extent to which undergraduate students restructure their conceptual knowledge at progressively more sophisticated levels over the course of a two-semester lecture-based physical geology sequence. Students completed concept mapping exercises and clinical interviews at regular intervals throughout the two semesters and data indicated that the course did not address integration of concepts into student knowledge domains. Concept maps and c...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2000in The journal of college science teaching
Michael Zeilik13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Walter J. Bisard2
Estimated H-index: 2
19 Citations
Published on Sep 1, 2008in The journal of college science teaching
Laura B. Buck1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Stacey Lowery Bretz19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Marcy H. Towns18
Estimated H-index: 18
90 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 2001in Learning Environments Research
Revital T. Tal12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Technion – Israel Institute of Technology)
This interpretive study of learning environments involved two groups of Israeli science teachers who participated in courses and implemented field trips as part of science‐technology‐society (STS) education and under the framework of general system theory. The different groups of preservice and experienced teachers were selected in order to provide diverse perspectives on learning environments associated with the enactment of field trips as enrichment for the science classroom. The article descr...
44 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2001
David K. Cohen25
Estimated H-index: 25
,
Heather C. Hill28
Estimated H-index: 28
Education reformers and policymakers argue that improved students' learning requires stronger academic standards, stiffer state tests, and accountability for students' scores. Yet these efforts seem not to be succeeding in many states. The authors of this important book argue that effective state reform depends on conditions which most reforms ignore: coherence in practice as well as policy and opportunities for professional learning. The book draws on a decade's detailed study of California's a...
406 Citations
Published on Mar 1, 1997in Journal of geoscience education
Nir Orion20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
David Ben-Chaim1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Yael Kali15
Estimated H-index: 15
The purpose of this study was to look for interrelations between the study of introductory geology courses and the development of spatial-visualization ability. The study was conducted among 32 undergraduate students during their first year of earth sciences study in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The students' spatial-visualization ability was measured at the beginning and at the end of the course by two different validated instruments. Pre- and post-geology scores were analyzed for any si...
68 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1970in The High School Journal
Larry A. Irwin1
Estimated H-index: 1
science, which has had a long and varied career as a secondary school subject, is now enjoying a period of rapid increase in enrollment, due in part to a growing disenchantment of most scientists and science educators with general science courses, and in part to a rebirth of interest in the earth and its environs. The rapid advance of science and technology during and following World War II has created the revolution in science education of
2 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 2002in Journal of geoscience education
Judi Kusnick3
Estimated H-index: 3
(California State University, Sacramento)
Students hold a surprising number of misconceptions about how rocks form. This study analyzes narrative essays - stories of rock formation - written by pre-service elementary school teachers. Most students had completed a college-level course in earth science, yet expressed startling misconceptions, including pebbles that grow, human involvement in rock formation, and sedimentary rocks forming as puddles dry up. These misconceptions arise from deeply held but largely unexamined beliefs, called h...
41 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2004in International Journal of Engineering Education 0.57
J. Fredericks Volkwein19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Pennsylvania State University),
Lisa R. Lattuca17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Pennsylvania State University)
+ 2 AuthorsJavzan Sukhbaatar1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Pennsylvania State University)
This paper summarizes the research design, sampling plan, and instrument development for the Engineering Change (EC) Project, a three-year research activity that examines the impact of ABET’s EC2000 on engineering education. The project assumes that, if EC2000 has been effective, evidence of change in ABET-accredited programs will be linked to changes in engineering student outcomes. The primary focus of the EC Project, thus, is on student learning. Compared to engineers prepared under previous ...
171 Citations
Cited By290
Bill Cerbin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Wisconsin–La Crosse)
The learning question in the scholarship of teaching and learning focuses on whether the work advances student learning. Although the scope of inquiry may vary, the learning question is, first and foremost, about outcomes—what or how much did students learn. It is typified by these kinds of research questions: Did the new teaching method I used produce better learning than the traditional method I have been using; Did the new assignment I used result in better student performance than the one I ...
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Published on Dec 1, 2015in Journal of Science Education and Technology 1.38
Nicole LaDue5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Northern Illinois University),
Julie C. Libarkin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Michigan State University),
Stephen Thomas4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Michigan State University)
The pervasive use of visual representations in textbooks, curricula, and assessments underscores their importance in K-12 science education. For example, visual representations figure prominently in the recent publication of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States in Next generation science standards: for states, by states. Achieve, Inc. on behalf of the twenty-six states and partners that collaborated on the NGSS, 2013). Although assessments of the NGSS have yet to be developed,...
5 Citations Source Cite
Tamara J. Moore14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Karl A. Smith25
Estimated H-index: 25
The inaugural issue (Volume 1, Number 1, 2000) of the Journal of STEM Education (then titled Journal of SMET Education) included an article by Nor- man Fortenberry titled "An examination of NSF's programs in undergraduate education." Fortenberry provided a comprehensive summary of the National Science Foundation (NSF) undergraduate education and training programs, which he categorized in five areas for impact in SMET education - curricula and institutions, faculty, courses and laboratories, dive...
15 Citations
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Journal of Science Education and Technology 1.38
Barbara Mirel10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Michigan),
Anuj Kumar26
Estimated H-index: 26
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+ 2 AuthorsFan Meng30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Michigan)
Life scientists increasingly use visual analytics to explore large data sets and generate hypotheses. Undergraduate biology majors should be learning these same methods. Yet visual analytics is one of the most underdeveloped areas of undergraduate biology education. This study sought to determine the feasibility of undergraduate biology majors conducting exploratory analysis using the same interactive data visualizations as practicing scientists. We examined 22 upper level undergraduates in a ge...
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Margery Anderson3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research),
Laura S. Tenenbaum1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research)
+ 1 AuthorsDebra L. Yourick14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research)
The near-peer mentor model provides undergraduates and recent post-baccalaureates in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields with an internship in two related disciplines, STEM research and STEM education. The near-peer mentor is both a mentored research intern and a mentor to pre-college students. During the 2013 summer, 43 near-peer mentors from seven sites reported on the benefits, challenges, and personal development they experienced during the internship. In addi...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2014in Journal of Research in Science Teaching 3.21
Enrique J. Lopez6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Colorado Boulder),
Richard J. Shavelson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Colorado Boulder)
+ 2 AuthorsJohn Penn1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Colorado Boulder)
Chemistry courses remain a challenge for many undergraduate students. In particular, first-semester organic chemistry has been labeled as a gatekeeper with high attrition rates, especially among students of color. Our study examines a key factor related to conceptual understanding in science and predictive of course outcomes—knowledge structures. Previous research on knowledge structures has focused on differences between experts and novices. Given the increasing ethnic diversity of college clas...
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Published on Feb 1, 2015in Journal of Research in Science Teaching 3.21
John C. Besley22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Michigan State University),
Anthony Dudo12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Texas at Austin),
Martin Storksdieck8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Oregon State University)
This study assesses how scientists think about science communication training based on the argument that such training represents an important tool in improving the quality of interactions between scientists and the public. It specifically focuses on training related to five goals, including views about training to make science messages understandable, as well as attitude-focused training meant to build trust and credibility, to demonstrate that one listens to the public, to demonstrate that one...
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Published on Aug 1, 2014in Journal of Research in Science Teaching 3.21
Laura R. Novick23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Vanderbilt University),
Emily G. Schreiber1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Vanderbilt University),
Kefyn M. Catley13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Western Carolina University)
With applications of Tree of Life data becoming ever more prevalent in everyday contexts, tree thinking has emerged as a vital component of scientific literacy. This article reports a study testing the hypothesis that instruction in natural selection, which is the primary focus of US evolution education at the high school and introductory college levels, does little to promote tree-thinking skills and that explicit instruction in understanding evolutionary tree diagrams is required. Testing this...
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Published on Aug 1, 2014in Journal of Research in Science Teaching 3.21
Vicente A Talanquer29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Arizona)
The extent and quality of Discipline-Based Education Research (DBER) at the post-secondary level have grown substantially in recent years. Associated research findings are central to current reform efforts to transform science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in colleges and universities across the United States. The increased visibility of DBER efforts creates opportunities and challenges that should be carefully analyzed. In this contribution, I reflect on critical issues th...
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Christine Creagh4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Murdoch University)
There is an expectation in first year university courses that students with the required pre-requisite knowledge, skills and attitudes, will succeed and transition into second year. Unfortunately this is not always the case. Even though students may have the necessary pre-requisites, as listed in the university handbook, they may not be metacognitive about their university studies. This lack in understanding, of the learning and teaching process, means that students do not fully appreciate what ...