• References (0)
  • Citations (280)
References0
Cited By280
Published on Jan 1, 1996in American Journal of Psychiatry 13.40
Gursharan Kalsi28
Estimated H-index: 28
,
Robin Sherrington20
Estimated H-index: 20
+ 8 AuthorsHannes Petursson37
Estimated H-index: 37
Objective: The authors investigated the possibility that genetic variation or mutation of the dopamine D5 receptor gene might modify susceptibility to schizophrenia. Method: Twentythree Icelandic and English pedigrees containing multiple cases of schizophrenia were genotyped by using a highly informative microsatellite for the D5 dopamine receptor gene DRDS. Results: By means ofthree different affection models, negative lod scores were obtained under assumptions ofautosomal dominant and recessiv...
17 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 1983in American Journal of Psychiatry 13.40
Miron Baron34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Rhoda Gruen20
Estimated H-index: 20
+ 1 AuthorsJohn M. Kane101
Estimated H-index: 101
The types and expectancy of mental disorders in the siblings of 74 probands with chronic schizophrenia were examined. The siblings were classified according to whether 1) both parents had schizotypal personality disorder, 2) one parent had the disorder and one was normal, or 3) both parents were normal. Siblings whose parents both had the disorder were at significantly greater risk for schizophrenia and schizotypal personality disorder than siblings with at least one normal parent. Similarly, th...
104 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 1984in American Journal of Psychiatry 13.40
Larry J. Siever82
Estimated H-index: 82
,
Robert D. Coursey24
Estimated H-index: 24
+ 2 AuthorsDennis L. Murphy19
Estimated H-index: 19
Impaired smooth pursuit eye movement has been proposed as a possible biologic marker for schizophrenia. Preliminary studies have suggested that this impairment may be associated with social introversion and related psychopathology in a nonpsychiatric population. To evaluate the relationship between dysfunctional smooth pursuit eye movement and schizophrenia-related psychopathology, the authors screened a new, volunteer sample of 284 male college students for eye tracking accuracy. Volunteers ide...
67 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 1993in American Journal of Psychiatry 13.40
J. M. Silverman23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Larry J. Siever82
Estimated H-index: 82
+ 7 AuthorsKenneth L. Davis93
Estimated H-index: 93
Objective: The possible heterogeneity of the schizophrenia-related personality disorder traits associated with DSM-III criteria for schizotypal personality disorder was investigated using the family history method. A familial relationship to schizophrenia was hypothesized for schizophrenia-related personality disorder traits wihtout coexisting affective personality disorder traits, pure schizophrenia-related personality disorder traits. Alternatively, a familial relationship with bordeline' pers...
44 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 1986in American Journal of Psychiatry 13.40
Kenneth S. Kendler153
Estimated H-index: 153
,
Lindon J. Eaves91
Estimated H-index: 91
The authors present three major models for the joint effect of genes and environment on liability to psychiatric illness: additive effects of genotype and environment, genetic control of sensitivity to the environment, and genetic control of exposure to the environment. Each model is illustrated by several examples, including a quantitative one. The authors attempt to demonstrate that genes and the environment can interact in several interesting and potentially subtle ways, that these interactio...
398 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1979in Journal of Affective Disorders 3.79
J. Angst2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
W. Felder2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
B. Lohmeyer2
Estimated H-index: 2
Abstract 1004 first degree relatives of 150 schizoaffective patients (41 males, 109 females) were studied and a total morbidity risk of 29.6% of schizoaffective spectrum disorders were found. The relatives show an increased morbidity risk for schizophrenia (5.26%) and affective disorder (6.55%) with a high incidence of catatonia and unipolar depression; schizoaffective secondary cases were only found in 3%. There is no significant difference in morbidity between parents, siblings and children. T...
67 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 1984in American Journal of Psychiatry 13.40
Timothy M. Rivinus10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Joseph Biederman161
Estimated H-index: 161
+ 4 AuthorsSteve Houseworth1
Estimated H-index: 1
Our sample consisted of 40 patients and 23 normal control subjects; all were nonadopted females. Twenty-seven inpatients were studied in Boston, at the Psychosomatic Unit, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and 13 patients (seven outpatients and six inpatients) in the Eating Disorders Unit, Child Psychiatry Service, Massachusetts General Hospital. Of those included, all but one met the diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa proposed by Feighner et al. (17) and DSM-III. The one patient barely ...
72 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 1989in British Journal of Psychiatry 5.87
Randy Katz17
Estimated H-index: 17
Depressive disorders are more common in the relatives of depressed probands than in the population at large, and there is compelling evidence that the familial aggregation of bipolar disorder and severe unipolar depression is at least partly due to genetic factors. However, the evidence concerning 'non-endogenous' depression is less clear, and family environment probably plays a stronger role. Much current research is focused on two areas: firstly, the mode of inheritance of manic-depressive ill...
158 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1985in American Journal of Psychiatry 13.40
Miron Baron34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Rhoda Gruen20
Estimated H-index: 20
+ 1 AuthorsLauren Asnis10
Estimated H-index: 10
The authors assessed the relevance of narrowly defined diagnostic criteria to genetic research in schizophrenia in the nuclear families of 84 chronic schizophrenic probands compared with families of 90 normal control probands. The morbidity risk for narrowly defined schizophrenia in first-degree relatives of patients with the narrow diagnosis was significantly higher than the control rate (3.8% versus 0.3%). The rate of chronic schizophrenia in the relatives of all schizophrenic patients was als...
22 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1977in Hospital Practice
Leonard L. Heston1
Estimated H-index: 1
In the first of three articles on schizophrenia, evidence for a genetic component is reviewed, including the high concordance in monozygotic twins, even when reared apart, and in children born to a schizophrenic parent or parents. The myth of the “schizophrenogenic mother” is rejected, though it does appear that as yet undefined environmental factors, by bringing about biochemical changes, may play an important role.
4 Citations Source Cite