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Career Counseling in the new Career Era: A Study about the Influence of Career Types, Career Satisfaction and Career Management on the Need for Career Counseling

Published on Jan 1, 2005
· DOI :10.2139/ssrn.878279
Anneleen Forrier12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven),
Luc Sels28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven),
Marijke Verbruggen10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Catholic University of Leuven)
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Abstract
We investigate whether the perceived need for employer-independent career counseling differs between individuals according to their career type. We identify six different career types, basically varying in terms of career path and career aspirations: the bounded, boundaryless, staying, homeless, trapped and released career type. We investigate moreover (1) whether career satisfaction mediates the relationship between career types and the perceived need for career counseling and (2) whether this is moderated by the career support people get from their organization and by their career self-management. We use data from a representative sample of 957 Flemish employees. The study reveals that mobility on the labor market, more than a discrepancy between one's career aspirations and one's career path, drives the need for career counseling. People in homeless, released and boundaryless careers are most likely to participate in career counseling. Moreover, the results strengthen the argument that lifelong access to neutral career counseling is valuable in the current career era. Career counseling fulfils a need of people who are dissatisfied with their career. This need cannot fully be met by organizational career management activities. The study moreover sheds light on a potential pitfall of career counseling. Mechanisms should be developed for the people lacking career competencies and the appropriate career self-management behavior to find their way to career counseling.
  • References (46)
  • Citations (4)
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References46
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2005in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
Michael B. Arthur38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Suffolk University),
Svetlana N. Khapova14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UT: University of Twente),
Celeste P.M. Wilderom28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UT: University of Twente)
This paper compares contemporary career theory with the theory applied in recent career success research. The research makes inconsistent use of career theory, and in particular neglects the interdependence of the objective and subjective careers, and boundaryless career issues of inter-organizational mobility and extra-organizational support. The paper offers new guidelines for bringing about a rapprochement between career theory and career success research. These guidelines cover adequacy of r...
Published on Mar 1, 2005in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
Nigel Nicholson37
Estimated H-index: 37
(LBS: London Business School),
Wendy de Waal-Andrews4
Estimated H-index: 4
(LBS: London Business School)
The article applies evolutionary theory to the concept of career success, to argue the primacy of objective outcomes, utilities such as status and wealth, and to analyze why the relationship with subjective career success is not stronger. Although there are grounds for expecting subjective evaluations to be sympathetic secondary accompaniments of objective success and failure, there are substantial numbers of paradoxically happy losers and unhappy winners in the career game. These are explored t...
Nikos Bozionelos2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Sheffield)
The relationship of the Five-Factor Model of personality and general mental ability with extrinsic and intrinsic career success was investigated in a British sample of 308 white-collar workers. Extrinsic career success was associated with both experiential variables and dispositional variables, while intrinsic career success was almost exclusively associated with personality traits. General mental ability contributed to eventual, but not to organization-specific extrinsic career success; and neu...
Published on Aug 1, 2004in Journal of Vocational Behavior3.39
Zella King10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Reading)
Abstract In a recent special issue [Journal of Vocational Behavior 59 (2001) 284], scholars noted that the field of vocational psychology needs a better understanding of career self-management. This article proposes a conceptual framework of career self-management, based on Crites’ [Vocational Psychology, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1969] model of vocational adjustment. It argues that people use three types of career self-managing behavior (positioning, influence, and boundary management) as adaptive...
Published on Aug 1, 2004in Journal of Vocational Behavior3.39
Douglas T. Hall57
Estimated H-index: 57
(BU: Boston University)
This is a review of the development of the authors ideas on the protean career. The origins include both personal experience and scholarly inquiry. I first applied the adjective ‘‘protean’’ to careers in 1976, in Careers in organizations. It described a career orientation in which the person, not the organization, is in charge, where the persons core values are driving career decisions, and where the main success criteria are subjective (psychological success). This paper traces the link between...
Published on Jun 1, 2004in Academy of Management Journal7.19
Claus W. Langfred9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UW: University of Washington)
A high level of trust can make the members of self-managing work teams reluctant to monitor one another. If low monitoring combines with high individual autonomy, team performance can suffer. Data from 71 self-managing teams of MBA students demonstrated this effect. High trust was associated with higher team performance when individual autonomy was low but with lower performance when individual autonomy was high. Additional analysis showed a moderated mediating role of monitoring and autonomy in...
Published on Jun 1, 2004in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
Luc Sels28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven),
Maddy Janssens25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven),
Inge Van den Brande3
Estimated H-index: 3
Summary The purpose of this study is to develop a feature-oriented assessment of psychological contracts, an underdeveloped approach to psychological contracts. Relying on theoretical frameworks in psychological contract research, industrial relations studies, and a cross-national study on psychological contracts, we identify six dimensions that capture the nature of psychological contracts: tangibility, scope, stability, time frame, exchange symmetry, and contract level. We validate this expand...
Karen van Dam1
Estimated H-index: 1
This study investigated the antecedents and the consequences of employability orientation, i.e., employees' attitudes toward developing their employability for the organization. Supporting the hypotheses, the results showed that employability orientation was positively related to openness, initiative, and the career anchors of managerial competence and variety, and negatively related to tenure, continuance commitment, and the career anchors of technical competence and security. Career anchors me...
Published on Nov 1, 2003in Human Relations3.37
Maddy Janssens25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven),
Luc Sels28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven),
Inge Van den Brande3
Estimated H-index: 3
The purpose of this study was to identify a variety of employment relationships based upon an economy-wide, representative sample. We turn to psychological contract studies examining different types of psychological contracts. We expand two existing typologies by incorporating multiple features or underlying dimensions of psychological contracts. Such a feature-oriented approach allows us to construct a meaningful conceptualization of employer and employee obligations across different settings a...
Published on Sep 1, 2003in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
Lillian T. Eby41
Estimated H-index: 41
(UGA: University of Georgia),
Marcus M. Butts19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UGA: University of Georgia),
Angie Lockwood7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UGA: University of Georgia)
Summary The present study examines three classes of career competencies proposed as important predictors of success in the boundaryless career. Three criteria of career success were examined: perceived career satisfaction, perceived internal marketability, and perceived external marketability. Using data from 458 alumni from a large southeastern university, predictions were tested using partial correlations and dominance analysis. The results found support for the importance of ‘knowing why,’ ‘k...
Cited By4
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2018
Michelle Gander3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Murdoch University)
Published on Jan 1, 2011
Maxim Kovalenko2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Dimitri Mortelmans1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Dec 21, 2007in Personnel Review1.36
Nicky Dries22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Vrije Universiteit Brussel),
Roland Pepermans29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
Purpose – The purpose of this empirical study is to make a contribution to career theory in general, and to the literature on high‐potential careers in particular, by examining the careers of real high potentials, taking place in the twenty‐first century world of work, from the perspectives of the high potentials themselves as well as those of their organizations.Design/methodology/approach – A total of 34 interviews were conducted within three study samples: high potentials (n=14), organisation...
View next paperThe Effects of Individual and Organizational Career Management of Career Satisfaction, Prospect, and Commitment