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Body shape index in comparison with other anthropometric measures in prediction of total and cause-specific mortality

Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health3.87
· DOI :10.1136/jech-2014-205257
Klodian Dhana15
Estimated H-index: 15
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam),
Maryam Kavousi39
Estimated H-index: 39
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)
+ 3 AuthorsOscar H. Franco74
Estimated H-index: 74
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)
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Abstract
Background The association of body mass index (BMI) with mortality remains controversial among the middle-aged and elderly. Moreover, the contribution of other anthropometric measures to predict mortality is unclear. Methods We assessed the association of BMI, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and a body shape index (ABSI=WC/(BMI 2/3 ×height 1/2 )) with total, cardiovascular and cancer mortality by using Cox proportion hazard models among 2626 men and 3740 women from the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study. Predictive performance was assessed through informativeness, c-statistic, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI), and continuous net reclassification improvement (cNRI). Results During 22 years of follow-up, 3675 deaths from all-causes, 1195 from cardiovascular disease, and 873 from cancer occurred. In the multivariable model, ABSI showed a stronger association with mortality compared with BMI, WC, WHtR and WHR. HRs and CIs (95% CIs) for total mortality per 1 SD increase in ABSI were 1.15 (1.09 to 1.21) for men and 1.09 (1.04 to 1.14) for women. For cardiovascular and cancer mortality, these HRs (95% CI) were 1.18 (1.08 to 1.29) and 1.10 (0.99 to 1.22) for men, 1.04 (0.96 to 1.12) and 1.18 (1.07 to 1.30) for women, respectively. The models including ABSI did not increase the c-statistics. Among men, in prediction of total mortality the model including ABSI was more informative (χ 2 =26.4) and provided improvement in risk stratification (IDI 0.003, 95% CI 0.001 to 0.005; cNRI 0.13, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.21). Conclusions In our population-based study, among different anthropometric measures, ABSI showed a stronger association with total, cardiovascular and cancer mortality. However, the added predictive value of ABSI in prediction of mortality was limited.
  • References (32)
  • Citations (40)
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References32
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2015in Clinical Nutrition6.40
Gianni Biolo47
Estimated H-index: 47
(UniTS: University of Trieste),
Filippo Giorgio Di Girolamo3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UniTS: University of Trieste)
+ 10 AuthorsZala Jenko Pražnikar2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Primorska)
summary Background & aims: Sarcopenic obesity may be defined by a high fat to fat-free mass (FM/FFM) ratio. Skeletal muscle may be negatively influenced by the pro-inflammatory milieu associated with visceral fat, while the loading effect induced by a heavier body mass index (BMI) may enhance muscle anabolism. Recently, a new anthropometric measure based on waist circumference (A Body Shape Index, ABSI) was developed. In this study we have assessed the predictive power of ABSI on the FFM index (...
Published on Mar 1, 2015in Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases3.34
Xin Song6
Estimated H-index: 6
(National Institute for Health and Welfare),
Pekka Jousilahti79
Estimated H-index: 79
(National Institute for Health and Welfare)
+ 8 AuthorsJaakko Tuomilehto84
Estimated H-index: 84
(National Institute for Health and Welfare)
Background and aims: Cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in relation to various anthropometric measures of obesity is still controversial. Methods and results: Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), A Body Shape Index (ABSI) and waist-to-hip-to-height ratio (WHHR) were measured at baseline in a cohort of 46,651 European men and women aged 24 e99 years. The relationship between anthropometric measures of obesity and mortality wa...
Published on Sep 8, 2014in PLOS ONE2.78
Margaret Ashwell28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Oxford Brookes University),
Les Mayhew14
Estimated H-index: 14
(City University London)
+ 1 AuthorsBen Rickayzen8
Estimated H-index: 8
(City University London)
Objective Our aim was to compare the effect of central obesity (measured by waist-to-height ratio, WHtR) and total obesity (measured by body mass index, BMI) on life expectancy expressed as years of life lost (YLL), using data on British adults. Methods A Cox proportional hazards model was applied to data from the prospective Health and Lifestyle Survey (HALS) and the cross sectional Health Survey for England (HSE). The number of years of life lost (YLL) at three ages (30, 50, 70 years) was foun...
Published on Feb 20, 2014in PLOS ONE2.78
Nir Y. Krakauer20
Estimated H-index: 20
(CCNY: City College of New York),
Jesse C. Krakauer10
Estimated H-index: 10
Background A Body Shape Index (ABSI) had been derived from a study of the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004 mortality data to quantify the risk associated with abdominal obesity (as indicated by a wide waist relative to height and body mass index). A national survey with longer follow-up, the British Health and Lifestyle Survey (HALS), provides another opportunity to assess the predictive power for mortality of ABSI. HALS also includes repeat obser...
Published on Dec 1, 2013in European Journal of Clinical Nutrition3.11
Xin Song6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Pekka Jousilahti79
Estimated H-index: 79
+ 8 AuthorsJaakko Tuomilehto148
Estimated H-index: 148
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Body mass index (BMI) is the most commonly used surrogate marker for evaluating the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in relation to general obesity, while abdom ...
Published on Jan 2, 2013in JAMA51.27
Katherine M. Flegal83
Estimated H-index: 83
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Brian K. Kit18
Estimated H-index: 18
+ 1 AuthorsBarry I. Graubard75
Estimated H-index: 75
Importance Estimates of the relative mortality risks associated with normal weight, overweight, and obesity may help to inform decision making in the clinical setting. Objective To perform a systematic review of reported hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause mortality for overweight and obesity relative to normal weight in the general population. Data Sources PubMed and EMBASE electronic databases were searched through September 30, 2012, without language restrictions. Study Selection Articles that r...
Published on Jan 1, 2013in BMJ Open2.38
Morten Schmidt27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Aarhus University Hospital),
Sigrun A. Johannesdottir10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Aarhus University Hospital)
+ 4 AuthorsHenrik Toft S⊘rensen97
Estimated H-index: 97
(Aarhus University Hospital)
Objectives To examine the association between body mass index (BMI) in young adulthood and cardiovascular risks, including venous thromboembolism, before 55 years of age. Design Cohort study using population-based medical databases. Setting Outcomes registered from all hospitals in Denmark from 1977 onwards. Participants 6502 men born in 1955 and eligible for conscription in Northern Denmark. Main outcome measures Follow-up began at participants’ 22nd birthday and continued until death, emigrati...
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Age and Ageing4.51
Laurence Genton31
Estimated H-index: 31
,
Christophe Graf12
Estimated H-index: 12
+ 2 AuthorsClaude Pichard65
Estimated H-index: 65
Background: low fat-free mass has been related to high mortality in patients. This study evaluated the relationship between body composition of healthy elderly subjects and mortality. Methods: in 1999, 203 older subjects underwent measurements of body composition by bioelectrical impedance analysis, Charlson co-morbidity index and estimation of energy expenditure through physical activity by a validated questionnaire. These measurements were repeated in 2002, 2005 and 2008 in all consenting subj...
Published on Jul 18, 2012in PLOS ONE2.78
Nir Y. Krakauer20
Estimated H-index: 20
(CCNY: City College of New York),
Jesse C. Krakauer10
Estimated H-index: 10
Background Obesity, typically quantified in terms of Body Mass Index (BMI) exceeding threshold values, is considered a leading cause of premature death worldwide. For given body size (BMI), it is recognized that risk is also affected by body shape, particularly as a marker of abdominal fat deposits. Waist circumference (WC) is used as a risk indicator supplementary to BMI, but the high correlation of WC with BMI makes it hard to isolate the added value of WC. Methods and Findings We considered a...
Published on Mar 1, 2012in European Journal of Epidemiology6.53
Maarten J.G. Leening19
Estimated H-index: 19
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam),
Maryam Kavousi39
Estimated H-index: 39
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)
+ 8 AuthorsBruno H. Stricker85
Estimated H-index: 85
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)
The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is rising. Therefore, adequate risk prediction and identification of its determinants is increasingly important. The Rotterdam Study is a prospective population-based cohort study ongoing since 1990 in the city of Rotterdam, The Netherlands. One of the main targets of the Rotterdam Study is to identify the determinants and prognosis of cardiovascular diseases. Case finding in epidemiological studies is strongly depending on various sources of follow-up a...
Cited By40
Newest
Published on Apr 24, 2019in Clinical Rehabilitation2.74
Javier Bueno-Antequera (Pablo de Olavide University), Miguel Ángel Oviedo-Caro (Pablo de Olavide University), D. Munguía-Izquierdo2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Pablo de Olavide University)
Objective:To evaluate the feasibility and effects of a 12-week intervention combining aerobic and strength exercises in prison inmates with psychiatric disorders.Design:Two parallel-group, randomized controlled trials.Setting:A psychiatric prison hospital.Subjects:Forty-one men prison inmates (mean age ± SD = 38.2 ± 9.2 years, mean prison duration ± SD = 2.6 ± 2.5 years) with psychiatric disorders (primarily personality disorder, n = 27; mean illness duration ± SD = 12.0 ± 10.5 years).Interventi...
Published on Sep 12, 2019in Cancer Causes & Control2.30
Helga Tryggvadottir1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Maria Ygland Rödström + 4 AuthorsHelena Jernström24
Estimated H-index: 24
Purpose To investigate the prognostic impact of body size changes during the first postoperative year in breast cancer.
Published on Apr 23, 2019in Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology2.71
Per Wändell31
Estimated H-index: 31
(KI: Karolinska Institutet),
Anna Andreasson18
Estimated H-index: 18
(KI: Karolinska Institutet)
+ 2 AuthorsAxel C. Carlsson23
Estimated H-index: 23
(KI: Karolinska Institutet)
Published on May 1, 2019in International Journal of Obesity4.51
Anne Pernille Ofstad4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Boehringer Ingelheim),
Christine Sommer8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Oslo University Hospital)
+ 4 AuthorsOdd Erik Johansen25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Boehringer Ingelheim)
The most widely used adiposity index, body mass index (BMI), is not optimal to evaluate cardiovascular (CV) risk associated with overweight and obesity. We aimed to explore the association between traditional and non-traditional adiposity indices and CV mortality, and compare their discriminative ability for CV death. We studied participants (age 19–79 years, BMI ≥18.5 kg/m2) from the population-based Norwegian Nord-Trondelag Health Study 2 (HUNT 2). Traditional indices explored were BMI, waist ...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Biomedical and Environmental Sciences1.92
Guang Li Wang (Soochow University (Suzhou)), Rui Zhang (Soochow University (Suzhou))+ 5 AuthorsYong Hong Zhang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Soochow University (Suzhou))
Abstract Objective We aimed to evaluate the combined effects of a high body shape index (ABSI) and a high serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level on the incidence of ischemic stroke in a Mongolian population in China. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted among 2,589 participants from June 2002 to July 2012 in Inner Mongolia, China. The participants were categorized into 4 groups according to their level of ABSI and CRP. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the hazard rati...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Nutrition3.59
Gang Li2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Hui-kun Wu1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 8 AuthorsBing Wu1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract Objectives A body shape index (ABSI) and body roundness index (BRI) were reported to predict diabetes and hypertension in general population, but their validity was regularly questioned. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ABSI and BRI are the best anthropometric indices to reflect metabolic syndrome (MetS), insulin resistance (IR), and inflammatory factors in obese and overweight Chinese adults. Methods Cross-sectional data on sociodemographic, lifestyle, anthropometric indic...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Diabetes & Metabolism Journal
Wankyo Chung2
Estimated H-index: 2
(SNU: Seoul National University),
Jung Hwan Park2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Hanyang University)
+ 3 AuthorsDong Sun Kim1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Hanyang University)
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome2.36
Fernando Gomez-Peralta7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Cristina Abreu4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 4 AuthorsJesse C. Krakauer10
Estimated H-index: 10
Background Obesity is known to be related to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). The most commonly used anthropometric indicator (body mass index [BMI]) presents several limitations such as the lack of possibility to distinguish adipose tissue distribution. Thus, this study examines the suitability of a body shape index (ABSI) for prediction of body composition and sarcopenic obesity in obese or overweight T2D subjects.