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Extent and sources of occupational stress in university staff

Caroline Biron11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Jean-Pierre Brun10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Laval University),
Hans Ivers32
Estimated H-index: 32
Abstract
Canadian higher education sector has undergone numerous changes during the past decades. Increased student enrolments, massive cuts in human resources and constant restructuring are changes likely to have had a considerable impact on all employees (e.g., administrative, trades, and faculty). While many studies conducted in different countries have shown that stress in universities is a problem of alarming proportions, to date, no study of the entire staff of a university has been carried out in Canada. This research uses an approach based on the prevention and management of the sources of occupational stress to study 1086 employees of a Quebec university. Data were collected by means of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. It was found that the proportion of individuals who reported a high level of psychological distress was twice as high (40%) than that reported for a Quebec-wide sample (20%). Work overload, the relationship with one's superior and participation in decision making were systematically reported as high risks to employees' health. It was found that human resources management practices have not followed the rapid organizational changes which affected the university in the past years. The results are discussed in light of the risk management approach.
  • References (41)
  • Citations (36)
References41
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2008in Criminal Justice Matters
Will McMahon1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Rebecca Roberts3
Estimated H-index: 3
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2007
David Alis4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
C. Beaucourt1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsGwénaëlle Poilpot-Rocaboy3
Estimated H-index: 3
1 Citations
Published on Feb 1, 2005in Higher Education Research & Development 2.01
Michelle Y. Tytherleigh9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Plymouth University),
Christine Webb31
Estimated H-index: 31
(Plymouth University)
+ 1 AuthorsC. Ricketts2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Plymouth University)
The higher education sector in the UK continues to experience significant change. This includes restructuring, use of short‐term contracts, external scrutiny and accountability, and major reductions in funding. In line with this, reports of stress at work in higher education institutions have also increased. The study reported here was carried out using a stratified random sample of all categories of staff (academic and non‐academic) from 14 UK universities and colleges. Levels of occupational s...
201 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2005
Charles M. Beach2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Robin Boadway39
Estimated H-index: 39
,
R. Marvin McInnis1
Estimated H-index: 1
Alarms have been increasingly raised about the declining quality of Canadian universities given years of chronic under-funding, overcrowding, and dramatically rising tuition fees and student debt levels. This volume offers a number of reform proposals to address these issues in Canadian post-secondary education. Topics include North American trends and key issues facing American higher education; funding and regulatory incentives; the struggle between accessibility and quality; the links between...
40 Citations
Published on Apr 1, 2004in Work & Stress 3.14
Colin Mackay10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Health and Safety Executive),
Rosanna Cousins10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Health and Safety Executive)
+ 2 AuthorsRon H. McCAIG2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Health and Safety Executive)
In the late 1990s, the Health and Safety Commission, as the lead authority in the UK responsible for Health and Safety at Work, conducted an extensive consultation exercise to elicit views about how work-related stress should be tackled. The Commission subsequently decided that regulation was not justified and opted for an approach with four strands. One of these was to work with stakeholders to develop clear, agreed standards of good management practice. This paper describes and discusses the r...
201 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2004in Educational Theory
Parlo Singh16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Queensland University of Technology)
This paper reviews four books on globalization and education. It begins with a brief overview of theories of globalization, focusing specifically on cultural globalization. The paper then moves on to examine how each of the books deploys and develops a theory of globalization in relation to the topic of education. It also examines the utopian vision of education outlined within the books, as well all as the methods used to undertake research in an era of globalization.
175 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2003in Quality in Higher Education
Gail Kinman21
Estimated H-index: 21
,
Fiona Jones27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Leeds)
Little research at a national level has examined stressors and strains in academics in the United Kingdom, although the sector has undergone widespread and rapid change during the past decade. This study suggests that job stress and demands have increased significantly in recent years, and job satisfaction and levels of support have declined. Several stressors were identified that are not only characteristics of the organisational climate, but also features of national educational policy. High l...
88 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2003in International Journal of Stress Management 1.95
Anthony H. Winefield40
Estimated H-index: 40
,
Nichole Gillespie2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 3 AuthorsCarolyn M. Boyd10
Estimated H-index: 10
This article presents results from a study of occupational stress in Australian university staff. The authors report data on psychological strain and job satisfaction from nearly 9,000 respondents at 17 universities. Academic staff were generally worse off than general staff, and staff in newer universities were worse off than those in older universities. At the aggregate level, selfreport measures of psychological well-being were highly correlated with objective measures of university well-bein...
199 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2001in Educational Psychology 1.34
Gail Kinman21
Estimated H-index: 21
This paper reviews research on occupational stressors and strains amongst academics working in UK universities. A brief history of research conducted in this field in the USA, Australia and the UK is provided. Four major themes are considered: (a) the prevalence of self-reported occupational stress and strain; (b) the features of academic work that are potentially stressful; (c) the impact of these stressors; and (d) observed differences between gender, age and grade. Studies reviewed here sugge...
116 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2001in International Journal of Stress Management 1.95
Anthony H. Winefield40
Estimated H-index: 40
(University of South Australia),
Richard Jarrett6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
2A survey was conducted of all staff members of an established Australian metropolitan university. The overall response rate for noncasual staff was 72% (77% for general staff and 65% for academic staff) resulting in a sample of N = 2,040. High levels of psychological stress were observed, despite the fact that trait anxiety and job satisfaction were normal. Psychological distress was highest and job satisfaction lowest among academic staff engaged in both teaching and research. In general, univ...
120 Citations Source Cite
Cited By36
Newest
Julie Dextras-Gauthier2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Laval University),
Alain Marchand22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Université de Montréal)
AbstractThe aim of this article is to analyze the extent to which organizational culture contributes to the symptoms of psychological distress in the workforce. Integrating organizational culture and work organization conditions makes it possible to examine how culture is associated with the various components of work organization conditions, and how these conditions might relate to symptoms of psychological distress in employees. Data from the SALVEO study were collected in 2009–2012 from a sam...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 2, 2018in Quality Assurance in Education 1.40
Carl Evans4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of the West of England),
John Gardener (University of Worcester)
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to highlight to universities the approach of professional associations in marking large volumes of assessments. Design/methodology/approach The issues arising in marking large undergraduate modules in universities are discussed, before describing the approach typically adopted by professional associations. The benefit for universities of adopting such an approach is then examined. Findings The key to marking large volumes for professional associations lies in...
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Renique Kersh (Northern Illinois University)
For women administrators in higher education, workplace factors like managing multiple roles; work bleeding into personal life; issues with leadership; discrimination and marginalization; and role insufficiency (i.e., ambiguity in work roles and reduced sense of control) contribute to increased workplace stress. Individual coping responses are often determined by how stressors are perceived indicating whether an individual will effectively or ineffectively manage a stressor. The purpose of this ...
Source Cite
Published on Dec 28, 2017in International Economic Review 1.74
Raheleh Salimzadeh1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Alenoush Saroyan13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Nathan C. Hall28
Estimated H-index: 28
Existing research suggests that academics are subjected to high levels of job-related stress. Numerous aspects of an academic career such as time constraint, work overload, work-life conflict, and emotional demands are stressful and trigger negative emotional responses. There is further evidence to suggest that job-related stress compromises physical and psychological well-being, and impairs productivity among academics. The purpose of the present paper was to review the empirical research on h...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017in Research Policy 4.66
Katia Levecque16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Ghent University),
Frederik Anseel21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Ghent University)
+ 2 AuthorsLydia Gisle7
Estimated H-index: 7
Research policy observers are increasingly concerned about the potential impact of current academic working conditions on mental health, particularly in PhD students. The aim of the current study is threefold. First, we assess the prevalence of mental health problems in a representative sample of PhD students in Flanders, Belgium (N = 3659). Second, we compare PhD students to three other samples: (1) highly educated in the general population (N = 769); (2) highly educated employees (N = 592); an...
52 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2017in European Journal of Psychology of Education 1.48
Sonja Lutovac4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Oulu),
Raimo Kaasila11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Oulu)
+ 1 AuthorsMerja Maikkola1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Oulu)
Lecturers often find themselves unable to appropriately interpret or deal with student feedback, which may consequently be essential to how they feel about teaching and students. Research into lecturers’ emotional responses to student feedback is scarce, despite the growing use of student feedback as a means of evaluating teachers’ work. This narrative study explores seven lecturers’ responses to student feedback. The lecturers had prior to the study participated in pedagogical training aimed at...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2017
Rosman Md. Yusoff7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia),
Kamran Azam1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Riphah International University)
The present study aims at exploring the perceived sources of stress among the faculty members of COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan by examining the stress coping methods used by faculty members for devising proposed stress management practices to faculty members. Two self-administered questionnaires were distributed among 150 randomly selected teachers from five campuses of (CIIT), Pakistan. The 1 st questionnaire comprised 20-items regarding five teacher’s stressors while th...
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Gail Kinman21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Bedfordshire)
ABSTRACTThis study utilises the effort–reward imbalance (ERI) model of job stress to predict several indices of well-being in academics in the UK: mental ill health, job satisfaction and leaving intentions. This model posits that (a) employees who believe that their efforts are not counterbalanced by sufficient rewards will experience impaired well-being and (b) feelings of ERI are more frequent and damaging in employees who are overcommitted to the job. A sample of 649 academic employees workin...
8 Citations Source Cite