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International organizations as orchestrators

Published on Jan 1, 2014
· DOI :10.1017/CBO9781139979696
Kenneth W. Abbott26
Estimated H-index: 26
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Philipp Genschel17
Estimated H-index: 17
(EUI: European University Institute)
+ 1 AuthorsBernhard Zangl14
Estimated H-index: 14
(LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)
Abstract
Part I. Introduction: 1. Orchestration: global governance through intermediaries Kenneth W. Abbott, Philipp Genschel, Duncan Snidal and Bernhard Zangl Part II. Managing States: 2. Orchestrating policy implementation: EU governance through regulatory networks Michael Blauberger and Berthold Rittberger 3. Orchestration on a tight leash: state oversight of the WTO Manfred Elsig 4. Orchestration by design: the G20 in international financial regulation Lora Anne Viola 5. Efficient orchestration? The Global Environment Facility in the governance of climate adaptation Erin R. Graham and Alexander Thompson 6. Orchestrating monitoring: the optimal adaptation of international organizations Xinyuan Dai 7. Orchestrating enforcement: international organizations mobilizing compliance constituencies Jonas Tallberg Part III. Bypassing States: 8. WHO orchestrates? Coping with competitors in global health Tine Hanrieder 9. Orchestrating peace? Civil war, conflict minerals, and the United Nations Security Council Virginia Haufler 10. Governing where focality is low: UNEP and the Principles for Responsible Investment Cornis van der Lugt and Klaus Dingwerth 11. Orchestration for the 'social partners' only: internal constraints on the ILO Lucio Baccaro 12. Orchestrating the fight against anonymous incorporation: a field experiment Michael Findley, Daniel Nielson and J. C. Sharman Part IV. Implications: 13. Orchestration along the Pareto frontier: winners and losers Walter Mattli and Jack Seddon 14. Orchestrating global governance: from empirical findings to theoretical implications Kenneth W. Abbott, Philipp Genschel, Duncan Snidal and Bernhard Zangl.
  • References (24)
  • Citations (60)
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References24
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2011
Bernhard Zangl14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Michael Zürn23
Estimated H-index: 23
Verrechtlichung ist fur Viele zum Hoffnungstrager fur eine bessere und friedlichere Welt geworden. Ironisierend ist das auf die Formel make law, not war gebracht worden. Doch was ist internationale bzw. transnationale Verrechtlichung ? Welche Rolle spielt sie im Kontext von Globalisierung und Global Governance ? Welche Ursachen liegen der internationalen bzw. transnationalen Verrechtlichung zugrunde und welche Wirkungen gehen davon aus? […].
13 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2010in Review of International Organizations 2.69
Kenneth W. Abbott26
Estimated H-index: 26
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Duncan Snidal27
Estimated H-index: 27
(U of C: University of Chicago)
International organizations (IOs) have been widely criticized as ineffective. Yet scholars and practitioners assessing IO performance frequently focus on traditional modes of governance such as treaties and inter-state dispute-resolution mechanisms. When they observe poor performance, moreover, they often prescribe a strengthening of those same activities. We call this reliance on traditional state-based mechanisms “International Old Governance” (IOG). A better way to understand and improve IO p...
119 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2010
James Mahoney39
Estimated H-index: 39
(NU: Northwestern University),
Kathleen Thelen32
Estimated H-index: 32
(MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Once created, institutions often change in subtle and gradual ways over time. Although less dramatic than abrupt and wholesale transformations, these slow and piecemeal changes can be equally consequential for patterning human behavior and for shaping substantive political outcomes. Consider, for example, the British House of Lords. This is an institution that began to take shape in the thirteenth century out of informal consultations between the Crown and powerful landowners. By the early ninet...
485 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 27, 2009
Kenneth W. Abbott26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
Duncan Snidal27
Estimated H-index: 27
(U of C: University of Chicago)
176 Citations
Published on Nov 16, 2008
Catherine Weaver7
Estimated H-index: 7
List of Figures and Tables ix Preface xi Abbreviations xv CHAPTER ONE: Introduction: Hypocrisy and Change in the World Bank 1 CHAPTER TWO: The World Bank Hypocrisy Trap 19 CHAPTER THREE: The World's Bank and the Bank's World 44 CHAPTER FOUR: Good Governance and Anticorruption: From Rhetoric to Reality? 92 CHAPTER FIVE: The Poverty of Reform 140 CHAPTER SIX: The Fog of Development 176 List of Interviews 193 References 195 Index 219
190 Citations
Published on Sep 1, 2008in Leviathan
Philipp Genschel17
Estimated H-index: 17
(JU: Jacobs University Bremen),
Bernhard Zangl14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Bremen)
There is a pervasive trend towards a denationalization of authority in advanced industrial societies. Government is no longer the exclusive business of the state but involves an increasing range of international institutions and private agents. It is often assumed in academic and political discourse that the internationalization and privatization of government weakens the state and may lead to its eventual demise. This assumption is wrong. As we show in our paper, the denationalization of author...
38 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2007in American Journal of International Law 1.91
John Gerard Ruggie29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Harvard University)
The state-based system of global governance has struggled for more than a generation to adjust to the expanding reach and growing influence of transnational corporations, the most visible embodiment of globalization. This paper reviews two recent chapters in this endeavor, focused specifically on human rights: the “Draft Norms on the Responsibilities of Transnational Corporations and Other Business Enterprises with Regard to Human Rights,” adopted by the United Nations Sub-Commission on the Prom...
111 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 24, 2007
David M. Trubek23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Louise G. Trubek10
Estimated H-index: 10
New approaches to regulation have emerged to deal with inadequacies of traditional command and control systems. Such "new governance" mechanisms are designed to increase flexibility, improve participation, foster experimentation and deliberation, and accommodate regulation by multiple levels of government. In many cases, these mechanisms co-exist with conventional forms of regulation. As new forms of governance emerge in arenas regulated by conventional legal processes, a wide range of configura...
57 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 2007
Klaus Dingwerth16
Estimated H-index: 16
Transnational rule-making is becoming increasingly common, with decisions being made at the global level, beyond the state. This book explores what the privatization of global rule-making means for democracy. Based on contemporary theoretical approaches to democratic global governance, it reconstructs three prominent rule-making processes in the field of global sustainability politics: the World Commission on Dams, the Global Reporting Initiative and the Forest Stewardship Council. Klaus Dingwer...
110 Citations
Cited By60
Newest
Published on Feb 19, 2019in Palgrave Communications
Laura Valente de Macedo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(USP: University of São Paulo),
Pedro Roberto Jacobi13
Estimated H-index: 13
(USP: University of São Paulo)
As nations agreed on a bottom-up approach to establish the Paris Agreement in 2015, Non-state Actors (NSAs) became increasingly acknowledged as key players in the implementation of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). In a mostly urbanised world, local governments have a major part to play in designing and implementing climate policies that will help overcome carbon lock-in and enable the transition to a sustainable low-carbon future. Transnational municipal networks (TMNs) have a well-do...
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Simona Pedde4
Estimated H-index: 4
(WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre),
Kasper Kok35
Estimated H-index: 35
(WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)
+ 5 AuthorsJill Jäger7
Estimated H-index: 7
Abstract With a range of potential pathways to a sustainable future compatible with the Paris Agreement 1.5 °C target, scenario analysis has emerged as a key tool in studies of climate change mitigation and adaptation. A wide range of alternative scenarios have been created, and core amongst these are five socio-economic scenarios (Shared Socio-economic Pathways or SSPs) and four emission scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways or RCPs). Whilst mitigation scenarios (the Shared Policy As...
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Published on Mar 19, 2019
Susanne Lütz14
Estimated H-index: 14
(FU Hagen: FernUniversität Hagen),
Sven Hilgers1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Rolf C. Hagen Group),
Sebastian Schneider (FU Hagen: FernUniversität Hagen)
Zusammenfassung Zur Bewaltigung der Folgen der europaischen Schuldenkrise schlossen sich erstmals die Europaische Kommission, die Europaische Zentralbank und der Internationale Wahrungsfonds zur „Troika“ zusammen. Krisengeschuttelte Eurolander erhielten Hilfskredite verbunden mit umfangreichen Kreditkonditionalitaten. Obwohl die Troika bestrebt war, nach ausen einheitliche Positionen zu demonstrieren, zeigten sich in Fragen der Schuldenrestrukturierung, der fiskalischen und strukturellen Anpassu...
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Regional Environmental Change 2.87
Katharina Hölscher4
Estimated H-index: 4
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam),
Niki Frantzeskaki26
Estimated H-index: 26
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam),
Derk Loorbach29
Estimated H-index: 29
(EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)
In light of the persistent failure to reduce emissions decisively, facilitate long-term resilience against climate change and account for the connectedness of climate change with other social, environmental and economic concerns, we present a conceptual framework of capacities for transformative climate governance. Transformative climate governance enables climate mitigation and adaptation while purposefully steering societies towards low-carbon, resilient and sustainable objectives. The framewo...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 2, 2019in Policy and Society 1.44
Benjamin Cashore33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Yale University),
Steven Bernstein22
Estimated H-index: 22
(U of T: University of Toronto)
+ 2 AuthorsKatharine Rietig1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Newcastle University)
A growing scholarship on multistakeholder learning dialogues suggests the importance of closely managing learning processes to help stakeholders anticipate which policies are likely to be effective. Much less work has focused on how to manage effective transnational multistakeholder learning dialogues, many of which aim to help address critical global environmental and social problems such as climate change or biodiversity loss. They face three central challenges. First, they rarely shape polici...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019
Economic globalization has resulted in corporations, unaccountable to states, making key decisions within an otherwise anarchic world order, rendering normal democratic functioning almost impossible. Global gridlock has resulted from the same issues that plague democracies today. Although transnational civil society has tried to achieve a degree of democratic global governance, the result mostly has been to reinforce the global power structure.
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in arXiv: Digital Libraries
Published on Jan 1, 2019
M. Evren Tok1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Khalifa University),
Cristina D’Alessandro1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of O: University of Ottawa)
This chapter scrutinizes the fragmentation of the OIC aid system. It is argued that this fragmentation is a result of the asymmetrical intergovernmental relationship between a small number of aid donors (notably the hydrocarbon-rich Gulf States) and a large and increasing pool of aid recipients. The chapter illustrates that this process is empowered by the asymmetrical setting of the OIC (there are very few donors with whom to compete), donors have “bilateralized” the multilateral by supporting ...
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