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Timing of blooms, algal food quality and Calanus glacialis reproduction and growth in a changing Arctic

Published on Jan 18, 2010in Global Change Biology8.88
· DOI :10.1111/j.1365-2486.2010.02175.x
Janne E. Søreide21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UNIS: University Centre in Svalbard),
Eva Leu19
Estimated H-index: 19
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
+ 2 AuthorsStig Falk-Petersen49
Estimated H-index: 49
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
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Abstract
The Arctic bloom consists of two distinct categories of primary producers, ice algae growing within and on the underside of the sea ice, and phytoplankton growing in open waters. Long chain omega-3 fatty acids, a subgroup of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) produced exclusively by these algae, are essential to all marine organisms for successful reproduction, growth, and development. During an extensive field study in the Arctic shelf seas, we followed the seasonal biomass development of ice algae and phytoplankton and their food quality in terms of their relative PUFA content. The first PUFA-peak occurred in late April during solid ice cover at the onset of the ice algal bloom, and the second PUFA-peak occurred in early July just after the ice break-up at the onset of the phytoplankton bloom. The reproduction and growth of the key Arctic grazer Calanus glacialis perfectly coincided with these two bloom events. Females of C. glacialis utilized the high-quality ice algal bloom to fuel early maturation and reproduction, whereas the resulting offspring had access to ample high-quality food during the phytoplankton bloom 2 months later. Reduction in sea ice thickness and coverage area will alter the current primary production regime due to earlier ice break-up and onset of the phytoplankton bloom. A potential mismatch between the two primary production peaks of high-quality food and the reproductive cycle of key Arctic grazers may have negative consequences for the entire lipid-driven Arctic marine ecosystem.
  • References (48)
  • Citations (256)
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References48
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2010in Limnology and Oceanography4.33
Margaret I. Wallace5
Estimated H-index: 5
(St And: University of St Andrews),
Finlo Cottier22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland)
+ 3 AuthorsAndrew S. Brierley27
Estimated H-index: 27
(St And: University of St Andrews)
We present observations of zooplankton diel vertical migration (DVM) over a period of 2 yr in an ice-free and a seasonally ice-covered Arctic fjord. The contrasting environments permitted assessment of the influences of physical and biological factors on temporal variability in DVM patterns and a test of the hypothesis that a reduction in summer sea ice extent and thickness following climatic warming will lead to changes in DVM via the loss of a shading effect on the pelagic marine environment. ...
Published on Apr 30, 2009in Marine Ecology Progress Series2.36
Sigrún Huld Jónasdóttir31
Estimated H-index: 31
(DTU: Technical University of Denmark),
André W. Visser29
Estimated H-index: 29
,
Carsten Jespersen1
Estimated H-index: 1
We utilized the varying fatty acid composition of phytoplankton to create 19 different food treatments based on different ratios of 5 potentially important fatty acids and offered these to the copepod Temora longicornis. Egg production and hatching was monitored and related to ingested carbon, dietary fatty acids and the utilization of maternal fatty acid reserves. Egg production rates depended on ingested carbon and the fatty acid 20:5n-3 from the diet and from the female reserves. Hatching suc...
Natalie D. Riediger12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Rgia A. Othman10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 1 AuthorsMohammed H. Moghadasian24
Estimated H-index: 24
Abstract Attention to the role of n-3 long-chain fatty acids in human health and disease has been continuously increased during recent decades. Many clinical and epidemiologic studies have shown positive roles for n-3 fatty acids in infant development; cancer; cardiovascular diseases; and more recently, in various mental illnesses, including depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and dementia. These fatty acids are known to have pleiotropic effects, including effects against infla...
Published on Feb 23, 2009in Biology Letters3.32
Jørgen Berge26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
Finlo Cottier22
Estimated H-index: 22
+ 11 AuthorsAndrew S. Brierley27
Estimated H-index: 27
High-latitude environments show extreme seasonal variation in physical and biological variables. The classic paradigm of Arctic marine ecosystems holds that most biological processes slow down or cease during the polar night. One key process that is generally assumed to cease during winter is diel vertical migration (DVM) of zooplankton. DVM constitutes the largest synchronized movement of biomass on the planet, and is of paramount importance for marine ecosystem function and carbon cycling. Her...
Published on Jan 1, 2009in Marine Biology Research1.29
Stig Falk-Petersen49
Estimated H-index: 49
(Norwegian College of Fishery Science),
Patrick Mayzaud26
Estimated H-index: 26
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
+ 1 AuthorsJohn R. Sargent72
Estimated H-index: 72
(University of Stirling)
Abstract The three Arctic Calanus species, C. finmarchicus (Gunnerus, 1765), C. glacialis (Jaschov, 1955), and C. hyperboreus, are the most important herbivores in Arctic seas in terms of species biomass. They play a key role in the lipid-based energy flux in the Arctic, converting low-energy carbohydrates and proteins in ice algae and phytoplankton into high-energy wax esters. In this paper we review the over-wintering strategy, seasonal migration, stage development, life span, feeding strategy...
Published on Oct 3, 2008in Geophysical Research Letters4.58
Kevin R. Arrigo59
Estimated H-index: 59
(Stanford University),
Gert L. van Dijken33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Stanford University),
Sudeshna Pabi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Stanford University)
[1] Loss of Arctic sea ice has accelerated recently, culminating in a 2007 summer minimum ice extent that was 23% below the previous low. To quantify the impact of this unprecedented loss of ice on marine primary production, we have coupled satellite-derived sea ice, SST, and chlorophyll to a primary production algorithm parameterized for Arctic waters. Annual primary production in the Arctic has increased yearly by an average of 27.5 Tg C yr−1 since 2003 and by 35 Tg C yr−1 between 2006 and 200...
Janne E. Søreide21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Norwegian College of Fishery Science),
Stig Falk-Petersen49
Estimated H-index: 49
(Norwegian College of Fishery Science)
+ 4 AuthorsKatarzyna Blachowiak-Samolyk13
Estimated H-index: 13
(PAN: Polish Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The feeding strategies of Calanus hyperboreus , C. glacialis , and C. finmarchicus were investigated in the high-Arctic Svalbard region (77–81 °N) in May, August, and December, including seasons with algal blooms, late- to post-bloom situations, and unproductive winter periods. Stable isotope and fatty acid trophic marker (FATM) techniques were employed together to assess trophic level (TL), carbon sources (phytoplankton vs. ice algae), and diet of the three Calanus species. In addition...
Katarzyna Blachowiak-Samolyk13
Estimated H-index: 13
(PAN: Polish Academy of Sciences),
Janne E. Søreide21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UNIS: University Centre in Svalbard)
+ 4 AuthorsElse Nøst Hegseth20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Norwegian College of Fishery Science)
The spatial variation in mesozooplankton biomass, abundance and species composition in relation to oceanography was studied in different climatic regimes (warm Atlantic vs. cold Arctic) in northern Svalbard waters. Relationships between the zooplankton community and various environmental factors (salinity, temperature, sampling depth, bottom depth, sea-ice concentrations, algal biomass and bloom stage) were established using multivariate statistics. Our study demonstrated that variability in the...
Published on Aug 5, 2008in Journal of Geophysical Research3.23
Sudeshna Pabi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Stanford University),
Gert L. van Dijken33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Stanford University),
Kevin R. Arrigo59
Estimated H-index: 59
(Stanford University)
[1] Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean has undergone an unprecedented reduction in area and thickness in the last decade, exposing an ever increasing fraction of the sea surface to solar radiation and increasing the habitat suitable for phytoplankton growth. Here we use a primary production algorithm that utilizes remotely sensed chlorophyll a, sea surface temperature, and sea ice extent data to quantify interannual changes in phytoplankton production in the Arctic Ocean between 1998 and 2006. Our resu...
Published on Aug 1, 2008in Continental Shelf Research2.13
Konstantin A. Rogachev8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Eddy C. Carmack56
Estimated H-index: 56
,
Michael G. G. Foreman21
Estimated H-index: 21
Abstract Academy Bay in the Sea of Okhotsk is an important summertime feeding ground for pelagic-feeding Bowhead whales ( Balaena mysticetus ) in the western subarctic North Pacific. The present work combines satellite observations with physical (CTD, currents, tides) and biological (zooplankton sampling) measurements. Data obtained aboard the RV Lugovoe in August–September 2003 and July–August 2004 show dense populations of zooplankton (such as copepods Calanus glacialis , Pseudocalanus sp., pt...
Cited By256
Newest
Published on Jan 31, 2019in Scientific Reports4.01
Françoise Amélineau6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Montpellier),
David Grémillet46
Estimated H-index: 46
(University of Montpellier)
+ 3 AuthorsJérôme Fort18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of La Rochelle)
Ongoing global changes apply drastic environmental forcing onto Arctic marine ecosystems, particularly through ocean warming, sea-ice shrinkage and enhanced pollution. To test impacts on arctic marine ecological functioning, we used a 12-year integrative study of little auks (Alle alle), the most abundant seabird in the Atlantic Arctic. We monitored the foraging ecology, reproduction, survival and body condition of breeding birds, and we tested linkages between these biological variables and a s...
Published on Oct 1, 2019in Earth and Planetary Science Letters4.64
Simon T. Belt35
Estimated H-index: 35
(PSU: Plymouth State University),
Lukas Smik7
Estimated H-index: 7
(PSU: Plymouth State University)
+ 2 AuthorsKatrine Husum24
Estimated H-index: 24
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
Abstract The spring phytoplankton bloom is a characteristic feature of mid-high latitudes in modern times, but can be challenging to identify in palaeo records. In the current study, we investigated the absolute and relative distributions of two diatom-derived tri-unsaturated highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) lipids, at least one of which has previously been suggested to be a possible proxy for the productive region of the marginal ice zone (MIZ) in the Polar Regions. Based on a comparison of the...
Published on Sep 5, 2019in Polar Biology2.00
Luciana Ferrero (National University of Cordoba), Natalia Servetto5
Estimated H-index: 5
(National University of Cordoba)
+ 1 AuthorsRicardo Sahade14
Estimated H-index: 14
(National University of Cordoba)
Ascidians are abundant and well-represented members of worldwide benthic communities, including Antarctica and the Arctic. These organisms exhibit different reproductive patterns usually related to a latitudinal gradient, as do many marine invertebrate species. Reproductive seasonality varies from one or two annual peaks in cold and temperate water species to continuous reproduction throughout the year in warm water species. Styela rustica (Linnaeus 1767) and Halocynthia pyriformis (Rathke 1806)...
Published on Aug 26, 2019in Global Change Biology8.88
Matthew C. Sasaki1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UConn: University of Connecticut),
Hans G. Dam39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UConn: University of Connecticut)
Published on Aug 29, 2019in Global Change Biology8.88
Melissa P. Galicia2
Estimated H-index: 2
(York University),
Gregory W. Thiemann18
Estimated H-index: 18
(York University),
Markus Dyck6
Estimated H-index: 6
Published on Sep 5, 2019in Polar Biology2.00
Mathieu LeBlanc2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Laval University),
Maxime Geoffroy6
Estimated H-index: 6
(MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)
+ 4 AuthorsLouis Fortier39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Laval University)
Previous work found that an earlier ice breakup favors the recruitment of juvenile polar cod (Boreogadus saida) by enabling early hatchers to survive and reach a large size by late summer thanks to a long growth season. We tested the hypothesis that, in addition to a long growth season, an earlier ice breakup provides superior feeding conditions for young polar cod by enhancing microalgal and zooplankton production over the summer months. Ice cover and surface chlorophyll a were derived from sat...
Published on Aug 29, 2019in Geophysical Research Letters4.58
Janet T. Duffy-Anderson9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service),
Phyllis J. Stabeno44
Estimated H-index: 44
(PMEL: Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory)
+ 14 AuthorsDavid Kimmel (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)
Published on 2019in Global Change Biology8.88
Sébastien Descamps17
Estimated H-index: 17
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute),
F. Ramírez (University of Barcelona)+ 7 AuthorsSvein-Håkon Lorentsen15
Estimated H-index: 15
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Frontiers in Marine Science
Paul Wassmann47
Estimated H-index: 47
,
Dag Slagstad30
Estimated H-index: 30
(SINTEF),
Ingrid H. Ellingsen16
Estimated H-index: 16
(SINTEF)
The northern Svalbard shelf region is part of the Atlantic advective contiguous domain along which nutrients, phyto- and mesozooplankton are advected with Atlantic Water from the Norwegian Sea along the Norwegian shelf bream and into the Arctic Ocean. By applying the SINMOD model we investigated how much mesozooplankton is advected into the northern Svalbard shelf region. We also compare this supply with the local mesozooplankton production. To achieve this, we selected a box north of Svalbard a...
Published on 2019in Polar Geography
David Palma7
Estimated H-index: 7
(NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology),
Alix Varnajot (University of Oulu)+ 6 AuthorsThomas Ronge
The effects of climate change are leading to pronounced physical and ecological changes in the Arctic Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ). These are not only of concern for the research community but also for the tourism industry dependent on this unique marine ecosystem. Tourists increasingly become aware that the Arctic as we know it may disappear due to several environmental threats, and want to visit the region before it becomes irrevocably changed. However, ‘last-chance tourism’ in this region faces se...
View next paperImpact of a shrinking Arctic ice cover on marine primary production