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Associations of Employment Frustration with Self-Rated Physical and Mental Health Among Asian American Immigrants in the U.S. Labor Force

Published on Nov 1, 2010in Public Health Nursing 1.16
· DOI :10.1111/j.1525-1446.2010.00891.x
A. B. de Castro10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Washington),
Tessa Rue24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Washington),
David T. Takeuchi38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Washington)
Abstract
Objective: This study examined the associations between employment frustration and both self-rated physical health (SRPH) and self-rated mental health (SRMH) among Asian American immigrants. Design and Sample: A cross-sectional quantitative analysis was conducted utilizing data from 1,181 Asian immigrants participating in the National Latino and Asian American Study. Measures: Employment frustration was measured by self-report of having difficulty finding the work one wants because of being of Asian descent. SRPH and SRMH were each assessed using a global one-item measure, with responses ranging from poor to excellent. Control variables included gender, age, ethnicity, education, occupation, income, whether immigrated for employment, years in the United States, English proficiency, and a general measure for everyday discrimination. Results: Ordered logistic regression showed that employment frustration was negatively associated with SRPH. This relationship, however, was no longer significant in multivariate models including English proficiency. The negative association between employment frustration and SRMH persisted even when including all control variables. Conclusions: The findings suggest that Asian immigrants in the United States who experience employment frustration report lower levels of both physical and mental health. However, English proficiency may attenuate the relationship of employment frustration with physical health.
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  • Citations (28)
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References60
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2010in American Journal of Public Health 4.38
Gilbert C. Gee34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of California, Los Angeles),
Katrina M. Walsemann18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of South Carolina),
David T. Takeuchi38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Washington)
Objectives. We examined the association of language proficiency vs language preference with self-rated health among Asian American immigrants. We also examined whether modeling preference or proficiency as continuous or categorical variables changed our inferences.Methods. Data came from the 2002–2003 National Latino and Asian American Study (n = 1639). We focused on participants' proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing English and on their language preference when thinking or speaking wit...
47 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2009in Epidemiologic Reviews 7.58
Gilbert C. Gee34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Annie Ro10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 1 AuthorsDavid H. Chae23
Estimated H-index: 23
Research shows that racial discrimination is related to illness among diverse racial and ethnic populations. Studies of racial discrimination and health among Asian Americans, however, remain underdeveloped. In this paper, the authors review evidence on racial discrimination and health among Asian Americans, identify gaps in the literature, and provide suggestions for future research. They identified 62 empirical articles assessing the relation between discrimination and health among Asian Ameri...
187 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2009in American Journal of Public Health 4.38
Krysia N. Mossakowski11
Estimated H-index: 11
Objectives. I examined whether unemployment while looking for a job and being out of the labor force while not seeking work have distinct effects on symptoms of depression among young women and men in the United States. I also investigated whether past unemployment duration predicts depressive symptoms.Methods. I used ordinary least squares regression to analyze data from the 1979–1994 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth.Results. Cross-sectional results suggested that current unemployment stat...
89 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2009in Social Science & Medicine 3.01
Sarah A. Burgard28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Michigan),
Jennie E. Brand18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of California, Los Angeles),
James S. House66
Estimated H-index: 66
(University of Michigan)
Economic recessions, the industrial shift from manufacturing toward service industries, and rising global competition have contributed to uncertainty about job security, with potential consequences for workers' health. To address limitations of prior research on the health consequences of perceived job insecurity, we use longitudinal data from two nationally-representative samples of the United States population, and examine episodic and persistent perceived job insecurity over periods of about ...
200 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2009in Social Science & Medicine 3.01
Kate W. Strully3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University at Albany, SUNY)
This study examines whether employment disruptions have varying health consequences for White and Black or Hispanic workers in the U.S. Since employment disruptions mark major shocks to socioeconomic status (SES), this analysis also speaks to a broader set of questions about how race/ethnicity and SES shape population-level health disparities. Data from 1999, 2001 and 2003 waves of the U.S. Panel Study of Income Dynamics provide no evidence of racial/ethnic variation in the health consequences o...
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2009in National Institute Economic Review
Ana Llena-Nozal1
Estimated H-index: 1
This study aims to assess empirically whether being employed or returning to work is beneficial for all in terms of mental health, especially for those who already suffer from a longstanding illness or disability. We use longitudinal surveys from Australia, Canada, Switzerland and the UK to estimate panel data models that link decisions regarding labour market choices to health developments. To allow for state dependence of mental health, a dynamic panel model is used. The longitudinal analysis ...
27 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2009in Social Science & Medicine 3.01
Wei Zhang12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Hawaii at Manoa),
Van M. Ta6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Focusing on Asian Americans, this study examines how self-rated physical and mental health depends on the layered social connections (including 4 types: family cohesion, relative support, friend support, and neighborhood cohesion), socioeconomic status, and immigration-related factors (including nativity, length of residence in the U.S., and proficiency of the English language). It draws on the 2002-2003 National Latino and Asian American Study, a nationally representative household survey of La...
89 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2009in Social Science & Medicine 3.01
Andrés A. Agudelo-Suárez14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Antioquia),
Diana Gil-González18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Alicante)
+ 4 AuthorsAitana Garí2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Union Institute & University)
One of the most important social phenomena in the global context is the flow of immigration from developing countries, motivated by economic and employment related issues. Discrimination can be approached as a health risk factor within the immigrant population's working environment, especially for those immigrants at greater risk from social exclusion and marginalisation. The aim of this study is to research perceptions of discrimination and the specific relationship between discrimination in th...
84 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2009in Social Science & Medicine 3.01
Kaori Fujishiro15
Estimated H-index: 15
(National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
While racial discrimination has gained increasing attention in public health research, little is known about perceived racial privilege and health. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data, this study explored the relationship of both perceived racial discrimination and privilege with well-being in the USA. Data were extracted from the BRFSS 2004 data set, in which 22,412 respondents in seven states and one major city provided data on perceived racial discrimination and ...
29 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2009in Journal of Behavioral Medicine 2.88
David R. Williams129
Estimated H-index: 129
(Harvard University),
Selina A. Mohammed14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Washington)
This paper provides a review and critique of empirical research on perceived discrimination and health. The patterns of racial disparities in health suggest that there are multiple ways by which racism can affect health. Perceived discrimination is one such pathway and the paper reviews the published research on discrimination and health that appeared in PubMed between 2005 and 2007. This recent research continues to document an inverse association between discrimination and health. This pattern...
1,446 Citations Source Cite
Cited By28
Newest
Published on Mar 5, 2019in Psychosocial Intervention
Edurne Elgorriaga3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Izaskun Ibabe Erostarbe11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Maitane Arnoso4
Estimated H-index: 4
The global economic crisis of the previous decade has accelerated internal mobility in the European Union. The main objective was to analyse perceived stress and mental health among Spanish immigrants and non-immigrants, as well as gender differences, and to examine the mediation role of perceived stress in the relationship between migration protective factors and mental health. A convenience sample (N = 941) was obtained by snowball sampling, contacting with social networks during 2014 and 2015...
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Published on Aug 1, 2018in Social Indicators Research 1.65
Zhongmin Wang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(James Cook University),
Xinlin Jing1
Estimated H-index: 1
In recent years, an increasing number of studies have investigated the well-being of international immigrants in host countries. An important indicator of immigrants’ well-being is job satisfaction. Job satisfaction reflects a pleasant emotional state, in which individuals positively appraise their job or work experience. In this article, we discuss the determinants of immigrants’ job satisfaction, based on research conducted over the past three and a half decades. The determinants observed in t...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Tobacco Induced Diseases 1.54
Aimei Mao4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Joan L. Bottorff41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Australian Catholic University)
+ 2 AuthorsMary T. Kelly17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of British Columbia)
Background Immigrants often experience economic hardship in their host country and tend to belong to economically disadvantaged groups. Individuals of lower socioeconomic status tend to be more sensitive to cigarette price changes. This study explores the cigarette purchasing patterns among Chinese Canadian male immigrants.
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Published on Oct 1, 2017in Social Science & Medicine 3.01
Annie Ro10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of California, Irvine),
Rachel E. Goldberg8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of California, Irvine)
Abstract Prospective studies have found unemployment and job loss to be associated with negative psychological and physical health outcomes. For immigrants, the health implications of employment change cannot be considered apart from pre-migration experiences. While immigrants demonstrate relative success in securing employment in the United States, their work is often not commensurate with their education or expertise. Previous research has linked downward employment with adverse health outcome...
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Published on Jun 1, 2017in Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps 0.88
Tae Kyung Kim1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Yonsei University),
Sang Gyu Lee7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Yonsei University)
+ 3 AuthorsE-C Park (Yonsei University)
Introduction We investigated the effect of unmet medical need on the mental health of Republic of Korea (ROK) Armed Forces personnel, as most of the service members work in remote areas and often experience such unmet needs. Methods This study used secondary data from the 2014 Military Health Survey (MHS), conducted by the ROK School of Military Medicine and designed to collect military health determinants. Descriptive statistics showed the general characteristics of the study populations by var...
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Published on May 1, 2017in Research Policy 4.66
Katia Levecque16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Ghent University),
Frederik Anseel21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Ghent University)
+ 2 AuthorsLydia Gisle7
Estimated H-index: 7
Research policy observers are increasingly concerned about the potential impact of current academic working conditions on mental health, particularly in PhD students. The aim of the current study is threefold. First, we assess the prevalence of mental health problems in a representative sample of PhD students in Flanders, Belgium (N = 3659). Second, we compare PhD students to three other samples: (1) highly educated in the general population (N = 769); (2) highly educated employees (N = 592); an...
52 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 2, 2017in Ethnicity & Health 1.77
Stephanie Premji7
Estimated H-index: 7
(McMaster University),
Yogendra Shakya6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Toronto)
ABSTRACTObjective. We sought to document pathways between under/unemployment and health among racialized immigrant women in Toronto while exploring the ways in which gender, class, migration and racialization, as interlocking systems of social relations, structure these relationships.Design. We conducted 30 interviews with racialized immigrant women who were struggling to get stable employment that matched their education and/or experience. Participants were recruited through flyers, partner age...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Journal of The Knowledge Economy
Guanyi Yang (Ohio State University)
Education is a crucial factor that determines labor market outcomes, especially for immigrants. This paper specifically examines the undergraduate major choice for Chinese immigrants and its relationship to their labor market outcome. Compared to other Asian groups and the mainstream society, Chinese immigrants are uniquely congregated in business and science categories. The level of popularity to a major is positively related to their labor market outcome. This finding reveals the current prema...
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Published on Dec 1, 2015in American Journal of Community Psychology 2.32
Corrina D. Salo2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Illinois at Chicago),
Dina Birman7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Miami)
Acculturation to the culture of the host society as well as to one’s heritage culture have been shown to impact immigrants’ adjustment during the years following resettlement. While acculturation has been identified as an important factor in adjustment of Vietnamese immigrants (Birman and Tran in Am J Orthopsychiatr 78(1):109–120. doi:10.1037/0002-9432.78.1.109, 2008), no clear pattern of findings has emerged and too few studies have employed an ecological approach. The purpose of this paper is ...
11 Citations Source Cite