Associations of Employment Frustration with Self-Rated Physical and Mental Health Among Asian American Immigrants in the U.S. Labor Force

Published on Nov 1, 2010in Public Health Nursing 1.16
· DOI :10.1111/j.1525-1446.2010.00891.x
A. B. de Castro10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Washington),
Tessa Rue23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Washington),
David T. Takeuchi34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Washington)
Abstract
Objective: This study examined the associations between employment frustration and both self-rated physical health (SRPH) and self-rated mental health (SRMH) among Asian American immigrants. Design and Sample: A cross-sectional quantitative analysis was conducted utilizing data from 1,181 Asian immigrants participating in the National Latino and Asian American Study. Measures: Employment frustration was measured by self-report of having difficulty finding the work one wants because of being of Asian descent. SRPH and SRMH were each assessed using a global one-item measure, with responses ranging from poor to excellent. Control variables included gender, age, ethnicity, education, occupation, income, whether immigrated for employment, years in the United States, English proficiency, and a general measure for everyday discrimination. Results: Ordered logistic regression showed that employment frustration was negatively associated with SRPH. This relationship, however, was no longer significant in multivariate models including English proficiency. The negative association between employment frustration and SRMH persisted even when including all control variables. Conclusions: The findings suggest that Asian immigrants in the United States who experience employment frustration report lower levels of both physical and mental health. However, English proficiency may attenuate the relationship of employment frustration with physical health.
  • References (60)
  • Citations (27)
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References60
Published on Feb 1, 2009in AAOHN Journal
Jenny Hsin Chun Tsai12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Washington),
Annie M. Bruck2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Washington)
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2003in Journal of cultural diversity
Jenny Hsin Chun Tsai12
Estimated H-index: 12
Abstract: Immigration involves extensive changes in living environments. Nonetheless, the predominant approach in the health science literature has been to utilize individual characteristics (including ethnic background) to explain and predict immigrants' lived experiences and health outcomes. Contexts, particularly the larger societal contexts by which immigrants are constituted, are generally ignored. Data from a critical ethnography regarding immigrants' experiences with language, occupation,...
14 Citations
Published on Oct 1, 2003in Journal of Immigrant Health
Brian Karl Finch27
Estimated H-index: 27
(RAND Corporation),
R. Catalano4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of California, Berkeley)
+ 1 AuthorsWilliam A. Vega59
Estimated H-index: 59
(Rutgers University)
We test whether or not labor market frustration is associated with clinical alcohol abuse/dependence diagnoses among labor migrants living in California. Our sample consists of 1576 Mexican labor migrants in Fresno, CA, who migrated for the purpose of seeking employment. Using clinical criterion (DSM-III-R), we find that frustrating experiences resulting from labor market exclusion and discrimination are significantly related to past-year alcohol abuse/dependence. Similarly, although high levels...
57 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2003in American Journal of Community Psychology 2.32
David Dooley32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of California, Irvine)
The economy is one of the most important social environments that affect well-being, and community psychologists have long studied the social costs of one key economic stressor—job loss. But economically inadequate employment has received much less research attention than unemployment in regard to mental health effects. This paper contrasts these two literatures and considers factors that might account for their differential growth including actual rates of unemployment and underemployment. Rece...
131 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2009in Social Science & Medicine 3.01
Kate W. Strully3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University at Albany, SUNY)
This study examines whether employment disruptions have varying health consequences for White and Black or Hispanic workers in the U.S. Since employment disruptions mark major shocks to socioeconomic status (SES), this analysis also speaks to a broader set of questions about how race/ethnicity and SES shape population-level health disparities. Data from 1999, 2001 and 2003 waves of the U.S. Panel Study of Income Dynamics provide no evidence of racial/ethnic variation in the health consequences o...
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2003in Journal of Health and Social Behavior 2.62
Eliza K. Pavalko19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Indiana University),
Krysia N. Mossakowski11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Vanessa J. Hamilton1
Estimated H-index: 1
This study uses longitudinal data to examine the causal relationships between perceived work discrimination and women's physical and emotional health. Using data on 1,778 employed women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, we investigate the structural and individual characteristics that predict later perceptions of discrimination and the effects of those perceptions on subsequent health. We find that perceptions of discrimination are influenced by job attitudes, prior experience...
216 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2005in Health Economics 2.32
Pinka Chatterji16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Cambridge Health Alliance),
Margarita Alegría65
Estimated H-index: 65
(Cambridge Health Alliance)
+ 1 AuthorsDavid T. Takeuchi34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Washington)
This paper investigates to what extent psychiatric disorders and mental distress affect labor market outcomes among ethnic minorities of Latino and Asian descent, most of whom are immigrants. Using data from the National Latino and Asian American Study, we examine the labor market effects of meeting diagnostic criteria for any psychiatric disorder in the past 12 months as well as the effects of psychiatric distress in the past year. Among Latinos, psychiatric disorders and mental distress are as...
80 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 1996in Journal of Economic Psychology 1.34
Arthur H. Goldsmith17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Washington and Lee University),
Jonathan R. Veum18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Bureau of Labor Statistics),
Darity William1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Abstract Psychologists Erikson (1959), Jahoda (1979, 1981, 1982) and Warr (1987) have offered theories to explain how experiences such as joblessness may lead to a decline in mental health. Other psychologists, including Rotter (1966) and Rosenberg (1965), have designed and validated survey instruments capable of measuring various aspects of emotional health including self-esteem. Using such construct measures the correlation between unemployment and self-esteem has been estimated. Unfortunately...
102 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2009in Social Science & Medicine 3.01
Kaori Fujishiro14
Estimated H-index: 14
(National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
While racial discrimination has gained increasing attention in public health research, little is known about perceived racial privilege and health. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data, this study explored the relationship of both perceived racial discrimination and privilege with well-being in the USA. Data were extracted from the BRFSS 2004 data set, in which 22,412 respondents in seven states and one major city provided data on perceived racial discrimination and ...
28 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2008in Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health 1.28
Jimi Huh16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of California, Irvine),
Jo Ann Prause1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of California, Irvine),
C. David Dooley1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of California, Irvine)
This study examines the physical health status of immigrants with specific considerations of Asian and Hispanic populations and explores possible mechanisms through which health outcomes of interest can be explained. Analyses of the National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS) of 2000 and 2001 revealed that foreign-born individuals reported fewer chronic diseases (hypertension, heart disease, asthma, cancer and diabetes) and had lower prevalences of various chronic diseases compared with U.S.-born w...
63 Citations Source Cite
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  • Citations (27)
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Cited By27
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Journal of The Knowledge Economy
Guanyi Yang (Ohio State University)
Education is a crucial factor that determines labor market outcomes, especially for immigrants. This paper specifically examines the undergraduate major choice for Chinese immigrants and its relationship to their labor market outcome. Compared to other Asian groups and the mainstream society, Chinese immigrants are uniquely congregated in business and science categories. The level of popularity to a major is positively related to their labor market outcome. This finding reveals the current prema...
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Published on Oct 1, 2013in PLOS ONE 2.77
Sunmin Lee19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Maryland, College Park),
Allison O’Neill4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Maryland, College Park)
+ 1 AuthorsDavid H. Chae22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Maryland, College Park)
Although acculturation may have positive effects for immigrants, including better socioeconomic profiles and increased occupational opportunities, their health profiles deteriorate with longer duration in the U.S. Prior research indicates that increasing acculturation is associated with some poorer health outcomes among immigrants in the U.S. However, most of these studies have used length of stay or English language proficiency as proxies for acculturation, and have mainly examined self-reporte...
33 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 28, 2014in Social Work in Health Care 1.10
Chi-Fang Wu10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Ming Sheng Wang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Mary Keegan Eamon16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
Using a national sample of single mothers from the 2007 and 2009 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, this study examined the effects of multiple employment statuses on the selfrated health of single mothers during the recent economic recession. Unlike other studies, the current study minimized selection bias by controlling for prior self-rated health, in addition to other predisposing factors, enabling factors, and need factors. We found that underemployment, but not unemployment, is as...
6 Citations Source Cite
Della Maneze6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Sydney South West Area Health Service),
Yenna Salamonson29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Western Sydney)
+ 1 AuthorsPatricia M Davidson48
Estimated H-index: 48
(University of Technology, Sydney)
The lack of host language proficiency is an important source of acculturative stress among new immigrants and is known to negatively impact on both physical and mental health. However, the acculturative stress and stressors of migrants from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds with functional English language skills in Australia are less well-explored. Using the Filipino migrants as examplar, this paper reviews acculturative stress in three sub-population groups in this commu...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2016in Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health 1.28
Lisa L. Lommel1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of California, San Francisco),
Jyu-Lin Chen17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of California, San Francisco)
We systematically reviewed studies to identify the association between acculturation and self-rated health (SRH) and the impact of nativity and language use in Asian and Hispanic adult immigrants. Six electronic databases were searched. Data on nativity and limited English proficiency (LEP) was extracted and analyzed. Nine studies met review criteria. A positive association between acculturation and fair/poor SRH among Asians and Hispanics was found. For both Asians and Hispanics, six out of eig...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 2, 2014in Journal of Addictive Diseases 1.76
Robyn Lewis Brown9
Estimated H-index: 9
(DePaul University),
J. A. Richman30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Illinois at Chicago),
Kathleen M. Rospenda22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Illinois at Chicago)
This study examined processes linking economic stressors, somatic complaints, and two alcohol-related outcomes (past-month drinking and problematic drinking). Structural equation models of data from a national survey revealed that somatic complaints partly explain the association between economic stressors and problematic drinking. The associations of both economic stressors and somatic complaints with problematic drinking were significantly greater for men than women. However, the association b...
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Published on Dec 1, 2013in Quality of Life Research 2.39
Judy Huei-yu Wang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Georgetown University Medical Center),
Inez Adams8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Harvard University)
+ 5 AuthorsRena J. Pasick27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of California, San Francisco)
Purpose Cancer-related stress is heavily influenced by culture. This study explored similarities and differences in survivorship care concerns among Chinese American and non-Hispanic White (NHW) breast cancer survivors.
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Published on Sep 1, 2012in Addictive Behaviors 2.69
Ganga Vijayasiri3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Illinois at Chicago),
J. A. Richman30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Illinois at Chicago),
Kathleen M. Rospenda22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Illinois at Chicago)
While most research has examined the long-term effects of alcohol consumption on health, the current study examines how health status impacts on drinking behavior. Using data from a national study conducted between 2010 and 2011 to assess the impact of the recession on drinking behavior, this study examines how economic hardships linked to the recent economic recession affect physical health, and how physical health may in turn affect alcohol use. Structural equation models were used to test the...
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Published on Apr 3, 2014in Organization Management Journal
Kerri Anne Crowne6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Widener University),
Jeremy Cochran1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Widener University),
Caryl E. Carpenter6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Widener University)
In the United States the Baby Boomer generation is advancing toward retirement age and many are choosing to stay in the workforce. This study develops and analyzes a model of the impact of older-worker-friendly (OWF) policies in organizations on job satisfaction, strain-based work/family conflict, and affective organizational commitment in older workers. The data included 368 full-time employed persons age 50 years or older who participated in a telephone survey. Linear regression was used to an...
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Published on Dec 1, 2014in BMC Health Services Research 1.84
Farah Ahmad18
Estimated H-index: 18
(York University),
Anuroop K Jhajj1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsArlene S. Bierman27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Toronto)
Background A single-item measure of self-rated mental health (SRMH) is being used increasingly in health research and population health surveys. The item asks respondents to rate their mental health on a five-point scale from excellent to poor. This scoping study presents the first known review of the SRMH literature.
55 Citations Source Cite