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The European Grassland Butterfly Indicator: 1990–2011

Published on Jan 1, 2013
· DOI :10.2800/89760
Chris van Swaay23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Arco J. van Strien22
Estimated H-index: 22
+ 25 AuthorsMartin Warren27
Estimated H-index: 27
Abstract
This report presents the European Grassland Butterfly Indicator, based on national Butterfly Monitoring Schemes (BMS) in 19 countries across Europe, most of them in the European Union. The indicator shows that since 1990 till 2011 butterfly populations have declined by almost 50 %, indicating a dramatic loss of grassland biodiversity. This also means the situation has not improved since the first version of the indicator published in 2005. Of the 17 species, 8 have declined in Europe, 2 have remained stable and 1 increased. For six species the trend is uncertain. The main driver behind the decline of grassland butterflies is the change in rural land use: agricultural intensification where the land is relatively flat and easy to cultivate, and abandonment in mountains and wet areas, mainly in eastern and southern Europe. Agricultural intensification leads to uniform, almost sterile grasslands for biodiversity. Grassland butterflies thus mainly survive in traditionally farmed low‑input systems (High Nature Value (HNV) Farmland) as well as nature reserves, and on marginal land such as road verges and amenity areas. (Less)
  • References (13)
  • Citations (26)
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References13
Newest
Published on May 1, 2010in Ecological Economics 3.90
Harold Levrel10
Estimated H-index: 10
(IFREMER),
Benoit Fontaine7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 4 AuthorsDenis Couvet30
Estimated H-index: 30
According to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), states have to provide indicators in order to assess the performance of their initiatives for halting the loss of biodiversity. Sixteen headline indicators have been identified for monitoring the CBD targets. Of these indicators only one, "Trends in the abundance and distribution of selected species," is a direct headline indicator of "non-exploited" biodiversity. In France, the implementation of this indicator is completely dependent on...
48 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2010
C Vanswaay8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Strien van A. J9
Estimated H-index: 9
+ 23 AuthorsEugenie C. Regan13
Estimated H-index: 13
25 Citations
Published on Dec 1, 2008in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Chris van Swaay23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Butterfly Conservation),
Piotr NowickiVladimir20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Jagiellonian University)
+ 1 AuthorsArco J. van Strien22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Statistics Netherlands)
Since the first Butterfly Monitoring Scheme in the UK started in the mid-1970s, butterfly monitoring in Europe has developed in more than ten European countries. These schemes are aimed to assess regional and national trends in butterfly abundance per species. We discuss strengths and weaknesses of methods used in these schemes and give examples of applications of the data. A new development is to establish supra-national trends per species and multispecies indicators. Such indicators enable to ...
144 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2008
Chris van Swaay23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Arco J. van Strien22
Estimated H-index: 22
+ 5 AuthorsJosef Settele53
Estimated H-index: 53
Summary 3 Chapter 1 / Introduction 4 Chapter 2 / Butterflies and Climate Change 6 Expected future changes 8 Chapter 3 / Constructing a Butterfly Climate Change Indicator 10 Methods tested 10 Method 1: Climate positive and negative species 10 Method 2: Shift of species over their European Range 11 Method 3: Changes in Community Temperature Index per country..11 Method 4: Supra-national changes in Community Temperature Index 12 Chapter 4 / First results 13 Method 1: Climate positive and negative s...
6 Citations
Published on Sep 1, 2006in Global Change Biology 9.00
Michiel F. WallisDeVries24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Butterfly Conservation),
Chris van Swaay23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Butterfly Conservation)
Global warming may explain the current poleward shift of species distributions. However, paradoxically, climatic warming can lead to microclimatic cooling in spring by advancing plant growth, an effect worsened by excess nitrogen. We suggest that spring-developing but thermophilous organisms, such as butterflies hibernating as egg or larva, are particularly sensitive to the cooling of microclimates. Using published data on butterfly trends in distribution, we report a comparatively greater decli...
103 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2006in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Chris van Swaay23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Butterfly Conservation),
Martin Warren27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Butterfly Conservation),
Grégoire Loïs1
Estimated H-index: 1
Europe has undergone substantial biotope loss and change over the last century and data are needed urgently on the rate of decline in different wildlife groups in order to identify and target conservation measures. However, pan-European data are available for very few taxonomic groups, notably birds. We present here the first overview of trends for an insect group within different biotopes across Europe, based on data from the Red Data Book of European Butterflies. The most important biotopes fo...
204 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 28, 2005in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 5.67
Richard D. Gregory39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Royal Society for the Protection of Birds),
Arco J. van Strien22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Statistics Netherlands)
+ 4 AuthorsDavid W. Gibbons23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Royal Society for the Protection of Birds)
The global pledge to deliver ‘a significant reduction in the current rate of biodiversity loss by 2010’ is echoed in a number of regional and national level targets. There is broad consensus, however, that in the absence of conservation action, biodiversity will continue to be lost at a rate unprecedented in the recent era. Remarkably, we lack a basic system to measure progress towards these targets and, in particular, we lack standard measures of biodiversity and procedures to construct and ass...
601 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 28, 2005in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 5.67
Jeremy A. Thomas36
Estimated H-index: 36
Conservative estimates suggest that 50–90% of the existing insect species on Earth have still to be discovered, yet the named insects alone comprise more than half of all known species of organism. With such poor baseline knowledge, monitoring change in insect diversity poses a formidable challenge to scientists and most attempts to generalize involve large extrapolations from a few well-studied taxa. Butterflies are often the only group for which accurate measures of change can be obtained. Fou...
309 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2001in The American Naturalist 4.26
I. Wynhoff1
Estimated H-index: 1
Maculinea butterflies live as obligate parasites of specific Myrmica host ants in meadow and heathland habitat maintained by low intensity landuse. Changes in agriculture caused the decline and extinction of many populations. In The Netherlands, Maculinea nausithous and M. teleius disappeared in the 1970s. In 1990, they were reintroduced following the recommendations of the IUCN. This study focuses on the evaluation of this reintroduction into the nature reserve Moerputten in the province of Nor...
29 Citations
Cited By26
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Landscape Ecology 3.83
Karl-Olof Bergman18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Linköping University),
Juliana Dániel-Ferreira (Linköping University)+ 2 AuthorsLars Westerberg18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Linköping University)
Context Loss and fragmentation of semi-natural grasslands has critically affected many butterfly species in Europe. Habitat area and isolation can have strong effects on the local biodiversity but species may also be strongly affected by the surrounding matrix.
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Published on Oct 18, 2017in PLOS ONE 2.77
Caspar A. Hallmann7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Martin Sorg1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 9 AuthorsThomas Hörren1
Estimated H-index: 1
Global declines in insects have sparked wide interest among scientists, politicians, and the general public. Loss of insect diversity and abundance is expected to provoke cascading effects on food webs and to jeopardize ecosystem services. Our understanding of the extent and underlying causes of this decline is based on the abundance of single species or taxonomic groups only, rather than changes in insect biomass which is more relevant for ecological functioning. Here, we used a standardized pr...
234 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 28, 2017in Nature and Conservation 1.37
Alessandro Campanaro10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Sã¶nke Hardersen2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 10 AuthorsMarco Alberto Bologna20
Estimated H-index: 20
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2016in Landscape Ecology 3.83
Anne Villemey5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
William E. Peterman18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Ohio State University)
+ 6 AuthorsFrédéric Archaux15
Estimated H-index: 15
Context Anthropogenic activities readily result in the fragmentation of habitats such that species persistence increasingly depends on their ability to disperse. However, landscape features that enhance or limit individual dispersal are often poorly understood. Landscape genetics has recently provided innovative solutions to evaluate landscape resistance to dispersal.
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2016in Landscape Ecology 3.83
Théophile Olivier1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Reto Schmucki9
Estimated H-index: 9
+ 2 AuthorsFrédéric Archaux15
Estimated H-index: 15
Context Understanding the factors contributing to maintaining biodiversity is crucial to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic disturbances. Representing large proportions of green area in highly modified landscapes, residential gardens are often seen as local habitats that can contribute to larger networks of suitable environments at the landscape scale.
11 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Oecologia 3.13
Julie Lebeau3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Université catholique de Louvain),
Renate A. Wesselingh18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Université catholique de Louvain),
Hans Van Dyck36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Université catholique de Louvain)
Agricultural intensification has a strong negative impact on farmland biodiversity (including flower-visiting insects), but understanding the mechanisms involved in this requires experimental work. We document the impact of nectar limitation on the performance of a flower-visiting insect, the meadow brown butterfly Maniola jurtina. We conducted two types of experiments: a field experiment in agricultural landscapes with grasslands of different management intensity and an experiment in outdoor fl...
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 0.85
Murielle Richard18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Centre national de la recherche scientifique),
Anne Villemey1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 3 AuthorsMichel Baguette42
Estimated H-index: 42
(Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Abstract We characterized fifteen microsatellite markers for the butterfly Maniola jurtina . For the six studied populations (96 samples) the total number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 55 and mean overall expected heterozygosity across all loci was 0.74. In spite of a high frequency of null alleles detected in part of the loci, a recurrent phenomenon in Lepidopteron, the estimation of pairwise F ST seems rather insensitive to the presence of these null alleles as shown by the high correl...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Biological Conservation 4.66
Anne Villemey5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Inge van Halder11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Bordeaux)
+ 7 AuthorsFrédéric Archaux15
Estimated H-index: 15
Abstract In agricultural landscapes, permanent grassy habitats are often fragmented and partly composed of linear elements. Landscape-level connectivity of both grassland patches and grassy linear elements actively contributes to biodiversity conservation in farmland. Nevertheless, their respective importance has rarely been tested. Butterflies form a suitable model group for this purpose; they have suffered a major overall decline in the last few decades and are known to be sensitive to landsca...
23 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 26, 2015in PLOS ONE 2.77
Ruth E. Feber22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Oxford),
Paul J. Johnson32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Oxford)
+ 8 AuthorsMartin C. Townsend6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Oxford)
Organic farming, a low intensity system, may offer benefits for a range of taxa, but what affects the extent of those benefits is imperfectly understood. We explored the effects of organic farming and landscape on the activity density and species density of spiders and carabid beetles, using a large sample of paired organic and conventional farms in the UK. Spider activity density and species density were influenced by both farming system and surrounding landscape. Hunting spiders, which tend to...
7 Citations Source Cite