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A therizinosauroid dinosaur with integumentary structures from China

Published on May 1, 1999in Nature 41.58
· DOI :10.1038/20670
Xing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Academia Sinica),
Zhi-lu Tang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Academia Sinica),
Xiaolin Wang33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Academia Sinica)
Abstract
Therizinosauroidea ('segnosaurs') are little-known group of Asian dinosaurs with an unusual combination of features that, until recently, obscured their evolutionary relationships. Suggested affinities include Ornithischia(1), Sauroyodomorpha(2,3), Theropoda(4-11) and Saurischia sedis mutabilis(12). Here,ve describe a new therizinosauroid from the Yixian Formation (Early Cretaceous, Liaoning, China)(13). This new taxon provides fresh evidence that therizinosauroids are nested within the coelurosaurian theropods(8-11). Our analysis suggests that several specialized therizinosauroid characters, such as the Sauropodomorpha-like tetradactyl pes(1,2), evolved independently, within this group. Most interestingly, this new dinosaur has integumentary filaments as in Sinosauropteryx(14,15). This indicates that such feather-like structures may have a broad distribution among non-avian theropods, and supports the hypothesis that the filamentous integumentary structures may be homologous to the feathers of birds(14,15).
  • References (15)
  • Citations (186)
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References15
Newest
Published on Aug 1, 1998in Chinese Science Bulletin
Carl C. Swisher44
Estimated H-index: 44
(Berkeley Geochronology Center),
Wang Yuanqing7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 2 AuthorsWang Yuan2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Xijin Zhao3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Xing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
We report here the discovery of a therizinosaur from the Early Jurassic Lower Lufeng Formation (Sinemurian stage) of Yunnan, China. This discovery extends the age range of these unusual animals, previously known only from the Cretaceous period (Albian-Maastrichtian stage1), back by another 94 million years. This is the oldest definitive record of a coelurosaurian theropod, which therefore minimizes the divergence time for members of the group. Most important, it contradicts the theory that the n...
27 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Ji Qiang12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Geological Museum of China),
Philip J. Currie50
Estimated H-index: 50
(Royal Tyrrell Museum)
+ 1 AuthorsJi Shu'an6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Geological Museum of China)
Current controversy over the origin and early evolution of birds centres on whether or not they are derived from coelurosaurian theropod dinosaurs. Here we describe two theropods from the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous Chaomidianzi Formation of Liaoning province, China. Although both theropods have feathers, it is likely that neither was able to fly. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that they are both more primitive than the earliest known avialan (bird), Archaeopteryx. These new fossils represe...
407 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Pei-ji Chen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Academia Sinica),
Zhiming Dong13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Academia Sinica),
Shuo-nan Zhen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(American Museum of Natural History)
Two spectacular fossilized dinosaur skeletons were recently discovered in Liaoning in northeastern China. Here we describe the two nearly complete skeletons of a small theropod that represent a species closely related to Compsognathus. Sinosauropteryx has the longest tail of any known theropod, and a three-fingered hand dominated by the first finger, which is longer and thicker than either of the bones of the forearm. Both specimens have interesting integumentary structures that could provide in...
473 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
David M. Unwin27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Bristol)
One of the hottest debates in palaeontology is whether birds evolved from dinosaurs. A study of two exceptionally well-preserved specimens of a theropod dinosaur from China — complete with skin, internal organs and eggs — provides new clues to the origin of feathers.
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 15, 1997in Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 2.19
Hans-Dieter Sues35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Royal Ontario Museum)
ABSTRACT A previously unrecognized partial skeleton of Chirostenotes pergracilis Gilmore, 1924 from the Upper Cretaceous Horseshoe Canyon Formation of Alberta (Canada) includes parts of the skull, much of the pelvic girdle, and elements from all regions of the vertebral column. It provides much new information concerning the skeletal structure of this unusual theropod dinosaur. Close structural correspondence between the maxilla of this specimen and the mandible of Caenagnathus collinsi R. M. St...
81 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 14, 1997in Science 41.06
Ann Gibsons18
Estimated H-index: 18
A new study of the lung structures of sectioned crocodiles and other reptiles has shown that they resemble the images of several flattened fossil dinosaurs from China. On page 1267, this lung evidence is used to argue not only that dinosaurs were incapable of the high rates of gas exchange needed for warm-bloodedness, but also that their bellowslike lungs could not have evolved into the high-performance lungs of modern birds. The new evidence challenges two of the reigning hypotheses concerning ...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 14, 1997in Science 41.06
Ann Gibsons18
Estimated H-index: 18
A year ago, the so-called "feathered dinosaur" Sinosauropteryx made the front page of The New York Times , and was viewed by some as confirming the dinosaurian origins of birds. But at this year9s vertebrate paleontology meeting in Chicago late last month, the verdict was a bit different: The structures are not modern feathers, say the roughly half-dozen Western paleontologists who have seen the specimens. But just what the structures are--and whether they link birds and dinosaurs--is still unde...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1997
Philip J. Currie50
Estimated H-index: 50
,
Kevin Padian16
Estimated H-index: 16
Thematic Table of Contents. Contributors. A Guide to Using the Encyclopedia. Michael Crichton, Foreword. Preface. Dedication. F.E. Novas, Abelisauridae. L.L. Jacobs, African Dinosaurs. G. Erickson, Age Determination. A. Chinsamy, Albany Museum. K. Padian and J.R. Hutchinson, Allosauroidea. P. Dodson, American Dinosaurs. L. Dingus, American Museum of Natural History. K. Carpenter, Ankylosauria. J.M. Parrish, Archosauria. J.R. Hutchinson and K. Padain, Arctometatarsalia. R.E. Molnar, Australasian ...
214 Citations
Published on Oct 1, 1993in Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 1.32
Dale A. Russell16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Zhi-Ming Dong2
Estimated H-index: 2
Remains of bipedal saurischians from lacustrine strata of Albian age in the Alxa ("Alashan") Desert of Inner Mongolia represent a new taxon and the most complete remains of an Early Cretaceous theropod so far discovered in Asia. A skeletal reconstruction generally resembles that of a moderately large prosauropod with long arms and a short tail. However, in its detailed morphology the reptile appears to be close to the ancestry of the Therizinosauridae Maleev, 1954 (for which Segno-sauridae Perle...
88 Citations Source Cite
Cited By186
Newest
Published on Mar 22, 2019in Scientific Reports 4.12
Xi Yao (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Chun-Chi Liao (Chinese Academy of Sciences)+ 1 AuthorsXing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Therizinosaurian theropods evolved many highly specialized osteological features in association with their bulky proportions, which were unusual in the context of the generally gracile Theropoda. Here we report a new therizinosaur, Lingyuanosaurus sihedangensis gen. et sp. nov., based on a specimen recovered from the Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group of Lingyuan, Liaoning Province, China, which displays a combination of plesiomorphic and derived features. Most notably, the specimen is characterized b...
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Published on May 1, 2019in Palaeontology 3.73
Manja Hethke6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Free University of Berlin),
Franz T. Fürsich37
Estimated H-index: 37
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)
+ 3 AuthorsStephen C. Weeks21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Akron)
Source Cite
Published on Feb 12, 2019in Frontiers of Earth Science in China
Federico L. Agnolin17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Matías J. Motta1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsFernando E. Novas29
Estimated H-index: 29
Recent years witnessed the discovery of a great diversity of early birds as well as closely related non-avian theropods, which modified previous conceptions about the origin of birds and their flight. We here present a review of currently the taxonomic composition and main anatomical characteristics of those theropod families closely related with early birds, with the aim to analyze and discuss main phylogenetic hypotheses that compete some topics about the non-avian dinosaur-bird transition. We...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.12
Yilun Yu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Peking University),
Kebai Wang6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 4 AuthorsXing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
The bone-beds of the Upper Cretaceous Wangshi Group in Zhucheng, Shandong, China are rich in fossil remains of the gigantic hadrosaurid Shantungosaurus. Here we report a new oviraptorosaur, Anomalipes zhaoi gen. et sp. nov., based on a recently collected specimen comprising a partial left hindlimb from the Kugou Locality in Zhucheng. This specimen’s systematic position was assessed by three numerical cladistic analyses based on recently published theropod phylogenetic datasets, with the inclusio...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2018in Palaeontology 3.73
Evan T. Saitta4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Bristol),
Rebecca Gelernter1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Jakob Vinther27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Bristol)
Identifying feather morphology in extinct dinosaurs is challenging due to dense overlapping of filaments within fossilized plumage and the fact that some extinct feather morphologies are unlike those of extant birds or those predicted from an ‘evo-devo’ model of feather evolution. Here, we compare a range of dinosaur taxa with preserved integumentary appendages using high-resolution photographs to better understand fossil feather morphology and gain insight into their function and evolution. A s...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018
Manja Hethke6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Free University of Berlin),
Franz T. Fürsich37
Estimated H-index: 37
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)
+ 1 AuthorsBaoyu Jiang13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Nanjing University)
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Palaeoworld 1.09
Corwin Sullivan22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Xing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Jingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Recently reported specimens from the Mid-Late Jurassic Yanliao (or Daohugou) Biota and Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota of Northeast China suggest that the early evolution of avian flight involved a surprising amount of homoplasy and evolutionary experimentation. Pennaceous feathers of variable size, structure, and extent occur on the hindlimbs of numerous Jehol and Yanliao paravian theropods, including some basal birds, and clearly had an aerodynamic function at least in the dromaeosaurid ...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017in Palaeontology 3.73
Stephan Lautenschlager24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Bristol)
Dietary specialization is generally considered to be a crucial factor in driving morphological evolution across extant and extinct vertebrates. The ability to adapt to a specific diet and to exploit ecological niches is thereby influenced by functional morphology and biomechanical properties. Differences in functional behaviour and efficiency can therefore allow dietary diversification and the coexistence of similarly adapted taxa. Therizinosauria, a group of secondarily herbivorous theropod din...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Lethaia 2.22
Manja Hethke6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Free University of Berlin),
Franz T. Fürsich37
Estimated H-index: 37
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)
+ 1 AuthorsBaoyu Jiang13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Nanjing University)
Clam shrimps have been recognized as a key group for the study of reproductive system evolution, owing to the diversity of sexual systems in extant members. However, there are comparatively little data on fossil taxa. In this study, we reveal the sexual system of the Early Cretaceous clam shrimp Eosestheria middendorfii (Yixian Formation, China). This is the first study that restricts the analysis to a single cohort, minimizing the otherwise considerable impact of ecophenotypic variation within ...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Journal of Experimental Zoology 2.43
João Francisco Botelho7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Daniel Smith-Paredes4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Chile)
+ 3 AuthorsAlexander O. Vargas13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Chile)
In early theropod dinosaurs—the ancestors of birds—the hallux (digit 1) had an elevated position within the foot and had lost the proximal portion of its metatarsal. It no longer articulated with the ankle, but was attached at about mid-length of metatarsal 2 (mt2). In adult birds, the hallux is articulated closer to the distal end of mt2 at ground level with the other digits. However, on chick embryonic day 7, its position is as in early theropods at half-length of mt2. The adult distal locatio...
2 Citations Source Cite