A therizinosauroid dinosaur with integumentary structures from China

Published on May 1, 1999in Nature 41.58
· DOI :10.1038/20670
Xing Xu39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Academia Sinica),
Zhi-lu Tang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Academia Sinica),
Xiaolin Wang30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Academia Sinica)
Abstract
Therizinosauroidea ('segnosaurs') are little-known group of Asian dinosaurs with an unusual combination of features that, until recently, obscured their evolutionary relationships. Suggested affinities include Ornithischia(1), Sauroyodomorpha(2,3), Theropoda(4-11) and Saurischia sedis mutabilis(12). Here,ve describe a new therizinosauroid from the Yixian Formation (Early Cretaceous, Liaoning, China)(13). This new taxon provides fresh evidence that therizinosauroids are nested within the coelurosaurian theropods(8-11). Our analysis suggests that several specialized therizinosauroid characters, such as the Sauropodomorpha-like tetradactyl pes(1,2), evolved independently, within this group. Most interestingly, this new dinosaur has integumentary filaments as in Sinosauropteryx(14,15). This indicates that such feather-like structures may have a broad distribution among non-avian theropods, and supports the hypothesis that the filamentous integumentary structures may be homologous to the feathers of birds(14,15).
  • References (15)
  • Citations (186)
Cite
References15
Published on Jan 1, 1980in Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 1.89
Rinchen Barsbold16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Mongolian Academy of Sciences),
Altangerel Perle1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Mongolian Academy of Sciences)
A new infraorder of theropod dinosaurs, Segnosauria, is established which includes a single family Segnosauridae Perle, 1979. Representatives of this infraorder display a highly distinctive, opisthopubic pelvis, a slender mandible and anteriorly edentulous lower and upper jaw. A new, alti-iliac type of saurischian pelvis is distinguished, which is characteristic of Segnosauria. Erlikosaurus andrewsi Perle gen. et sp. n. is preliminarily described; a short description of Segnosaurus galbinensis P...
22 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
David M. Unwin20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Bristol)
One of the hottest debates in palaeontology is whether birds evolved from dinosaurs. A study of two exceptionally well-preserved specimens of a theropod dinosaur from China — complete with skin, internal organs and eggs — provides new clues to the origin of feathers.
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 14, 1997in Science 41.06
Ann Gibsons18
Estimated H-index: 18
A new study of the lung structures of sectioned crocodiles and other reptiles has shown that they resemble the images of several flattened fossil dinosaurs from China. On page 1267, this lung evidence is used to argue not only that dinosaurs were incapable of the high rates of gas exchange needed for warm-bloodedness, but also that their bellowslike lungs could not have evolved into the high-performance lungs of modern birds. The new evidence challenges two of the reigning hypotheses concerning ...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Ji Qiang10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Geological Museum of China),
Philip J. Currie45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Royal Tyrrell Museum)
+ 1 AuthorsJi Shu-an2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Royal Tyrrell Museum)
Current controversy over the origin and early evolution of birds centres on whether or not they are derived from coelurosaurian theropod dinosaurs. Here we describe two theropods from the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous Chaomidianzi Formation of Liaoning province, China. Although both theropods have feathers, It Is likely that neither was able to fly. Phylogenetic analysis Indicates that they are both more primitive than the earliest known avlalan (bird), Archaeopteryx. These new fossils represe...
402 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Pei-ji Chen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Academia Sinica),
Zhiming Dong12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Academia Sinica),
Shuo-nan Zhen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(American Museum of Natural History)
Two spectacular fossilized dinosaur skeletons were recently discovered in Liaoning in northeastern China. Here we describe the two nearly complete skeletons of a small theropod that represent a species closely related to Compsognathus. Sinosauropteryx has the longest tail of any known theropod, and a three-fingered hand dominated by the first finger, which is longer and thicker than either of the bones of the forearm. Both specimens have interesting integumentary structures that could provide in...
468 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Xijin Zhao3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Xing Xu39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
27 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 1998in Chinese Science Bulletin
Carl C. Swisher43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Berkeley Geochronology Center),
Wang Yuanqing4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 2 AuthorsWang Yuan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 15, 1997in Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 2.19
Hans-Dieter Sues30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Royal Ontario Museum)
ABSTRACT A previously unrecognized partial skeleton of Chirostenotes pergracilis Gilmore, 1924 from the Upper Cretaceous Horseshoe Canyon Formation of Alberta (Canada) includes parts of the skull, much of the pelvic girdle, and elements from all regions of the vertebral column. It provides much new information concerning the skeletal structure of this unusual theropod dinosaur. Close structural correspondence between the maxilla of this specimen and the mandible of Caenagnathus collinsi R. M. St...
81 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 1984in Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 2.19
Gregory S. Paul3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Johns Hopkins University)
ABSTRACT Segnosaurus Perle, 1979, and Erlikosaurus Barsbold & Perle, 1980, are recently described dinosaurs of unusual form from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia. Both taxa are medium-sized herbivores with small skulls, beaks, spatulate teeth, retroverted pubes, and broad four-digit hindfeet. Barsbold and Perle consider them to be theropods. However, the feet of segnosaurs are much less derived than are the bird-like feet of theropods. Further, the segnosaurs do not show any distinctive theropod-...
40 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 1993in Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 1.32
Dale A. Russell16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Zhi-Ming Dong2
Estimated H-index: 2
Remains of bipedal saurischians from lacustrine strata of Albian age in the Alxa ("Alashan") Desert of Inner Mongolia represent a new taxon and the most complete remains of an Early Cretaceous theropod so far discovered in Asia. A skeletal reconstruction generally resembles that of a moderately large prosauropod with long arms and a short tail. However, in its detailed morphology the reptile appears to be close to the ancestry of the Therizinosauridae Maleev, 1954 (for which Segno-sauridae Perle...
87 Citations Source Cite
  • References (15)
  • Citations (186)
Cite
Cited By186
Published on Jan 1, 2006in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 1.76
Lisa L. Sandell17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Stowers Institute for Medical Research),
Paul A. Trainor38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Stowers Institute for Medical Research)
Patterning and morphogenesis of neural crest-derived tissues within a developing vertebrate embryo rely on a complex balance between signals acquired by neural crest cells in the neuroepithelium during their formation and signals from the tissues that the neural crest cells contact during their migration. Axial identity of hindbrain neural crest is controlled by a combinatorial pattern of Hox gene expression. Cellular interactions that pattern neural crest involve signals from the same key molec...
21 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2002in Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 1.89
Teresa Maryańska3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Halszka Osmólska10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Mieczysław Wolsan14
Estimated H-index: 14
Oviraptorosauria is a clade of Cretaceous theropod dinosaurs of uncertain affinities within Maniraptoriformes. All pre− vious phylogenetic analyses placed oviraptorosaurs outside a close relationship to birds (Avialae), recognizing Dromaeo− sauridae or Troodontidae, or a clade containing these two taxa (Deinonychosauria), as sister taxon to birds. Here we pres− ent the results of a phylogenetic analysis using 195 characters scored for four outgroup and 13 maniraptoriform (ingroup) terminal taxa,...
52 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 2005in International Review of Neurobiology 2.37
Mitchell L. Sutter25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of California, Davis)
Publisher Summary This chapter focuses on the techniques used to probe spectral processing in auditory cortex, and proposes a rather simple model for how auditory cortex might be able to achieve fast multi-spectral scale analysis. While pure tones and AM sounds have proved to be useful stimuli for studying the auditory system, a better understanding of the need to separately define spectral processing can be seen by using a natural stimulus. The chapter also explains the different methods of mea...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2000in Nature 41.58
Rex Dalton R17
Estimated H-index: 17
Stunning fossils from Liaoning province have created a boom for Chinese palaeontologists and local farmers alike. Rex Dalton reports from the wild frontier where researchers do battle with the black market.
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2005in International Review of Neurobiology 2.37
Monty A. Escabí20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Connecticut),
Heather L. Read21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Connecticut)
Publisher Summary This chapter examines the principles of spectral analysis and coding in the ascending central auditory system. The identifying key response properties of single neurons in the lemniscal divisions of the inferior colliculus (ICC), auditory thalamus (MGBv), and primary auditory cortex (AI) that can be related to the underlying anatomical architecture in these stations, are discussed. Starting with the divergent pathway from the cochlea to the brainstem nuclei, the ICC receives in...
18 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2000in Nature 41.58
John M. Rensberger1
Estimated H-index: 1
(American Museum of Natural History),
Mahito Watabe14
Estimated H-index: 14
After observation of detailed structural evidence for the origin of birds from dinosaurs 1 , and in light of evidence that dinosaur bone tissue resembles the histology in mammals 2 , the histology of bone has become one of the focal points in discussions of the physiology of dinosaurs and Mesozoic birds 3-10 . Most of this microstructural information has focused on features related to the vascular organization and the amount of remodelled bone around vascular canals. However, the finer structure...
39 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2000in Nature 41.58
Xing Xu39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Xiaolin Wang30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Non-avian dinosaurs are mostly medium to large-sized animals, and to date all known mature specimens are larger than the most primitive bird, Archaeopteryx(1). Here we report on a new dromaeosaurid dinosaur, Microraptor zhaoianus gen. et sp. nov., from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of Liaoning, China(2). This is the first mature non-avian dinosaur to be found that is smaller than Archaeopteryx(1), and it eliminates the size disparity between the earliest birds and their closest non-av...
445 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2001in Nature 41.58
Qiang Ji12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Mark A. Norell53
Estimated H-index: 53
(American Museum of Natural History)
+ 2 AuthorsDong Ren25
Estimated H-index: 25
Non-avian theropod dinosaurs with preserved integumentary coverings are becoming more common 1-6 ; but apart from the multiple specimens of Caudipteryx, which have true feathers 2,7 , animals that are reasonably complete and entirely articulated that show these structures in relation to the body have not been reported. Here we report on an enigmatic small theropod dinosaur that is covered with filamentous feather-like structures over its entire body.
112 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 1999in Nature 41.58
Xing Xu39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Academia Sinica),
Xiaolin Wang30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Academia Sinica),
Xiao-Chun Wu14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Academia Sinica)
Dromaeosaurids, despite their notoriety, are poorly characterized meat-eating dinosaurs, and were previously known only from disarticulated or fragmentary specimens(1). Many studies have denied their close relationship to birds(2,3). Here we report the best represented and probably the earliest dromaeosaurid yet discovered, Sinornithosaurus millenii gen. et sp. nov., from Sihetun, the famous Mesozoic fish-dinosaur-bird locality in China(4,5). Sinornithosaurus not only greatly increases our knowl...
215 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 10, 2015in PLOS ONE 2.77
Brandon P. Hedrick6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Pennsylvania),
Lindsay E. Zanno14
Estimated H-index: 14
(North Carolina State University)
+ 1 AuthorsPeter Dodson28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Pennsylvania)
Nothronychus was the first definitive therizinosaurian discovered in North America and currently represents the most specialized North American therizinosaurian genus. It is known from two species, No. mckinleyi from the Moreno Hill Formation (middle Turonian) in west-central New Mexico, and No. graffami from the Tropic Shale (early Turonian) in south-central Utah. Both species are represented by partial to nearly complete skeletons that have helped elucidate evolutionary trends in Therizinosaur...
9 Citations Source Cite