scinapse is loading now...

Two feathered dinosaurs from northeastern China

Published on Jun 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
· DOI :10.1038/31635
Ji Qiang12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Geological Museum of China),
Philip J. Currie50
Estimated H-index: 50
(Royal Tyrrell Museum)
+ 1 AuthorsJi Shu'an6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Geological Museum of China)
Abstract
Current controversy over the origin and early evolution of birds centres on whether or not they are derived from coelurosaurian theropod dinosaurs. Here we describe two theropods from the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous Chaomidianzi Formation of Liaoning province, China. Although both theropods have feathers, it is likely that neither was able to fly. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that they are both more primitive than the earliest known avialan (bird), Archaeopteryx. These new fossils represent stages in the evolution of birds from feathered, ground-living, bipedal dinosaurs.
  • References (15)
  • Citations (407)
Cite
References15
Newest
Published on Mar 20, 1998in Science 41.06
Catherine A. Forster30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Stony Brook University),
Scott D. Sampson26
Estimated H-index: 26
+ 1 AuthorsDavid W. Krause34
Estimated H-index: 34
A partial skeleton of a primitive bird, Rahona ostromi , gen. et sp. nov., has been discovered from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. This specimen, although exhibiting avian features such as a reversed hallux and ulnar papillae, retains characteristics that indicate a theropod ancestry, including a pubic foot and hyposphene-hypantra vertebral articulations. Rahona has a robust, hyperextendible second digit on the hind foot that terminates in a sicklelike claw, a unique characteristic of the th...
222 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Luis M. Chiappe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(American Museum of Natural History),
Mark A. Norell57
Estimated H-index: 57
(American Museum of Natural History),
James M. Clark36
Estimated H-index: 36
(George Washington University)
In joint expeditions, researchers from the American Museum of Natural History and the Mongolian Academy of Sciences have recovered over 20 alvarezsaurid (Theropoda: Aves) specimens in the Late Cretaceous beds of Mongolia's Gobi Desert1. Here we describe a new taxon that is closely related to Mononykus2,3. This new taxon is represented by two exquisitely preserved skulls — the first known for Alvarezsauridae — details of which support the theory that the group is related to birds4,5. This theory ...
83 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Pei-ji Chen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Academia Sinica),
Zhiming Dong13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Academia Sinica),
Shuo-nan Zhen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(American Museum of Natural History)
Two spectacular fossilized dinosaur skeletons were recently discovered in Liaoning in northeastern China. Here we describe the two nearly complete skeletons of a small theropod that represent a species closely related to Compsognathus. Sinosauropteryx has the longest tail of any known theropod, and a three-fingered hand dominated by the first finger, which is longer and thicker than either of the bones of the forearm. Both specimens have interesting integumentary structures that could provide in...
473 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 1997in Chinese Science Bulletin
Lianhai Hou8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
AFTER the publication of the fossil bird Confuciusorins , additional skeletons of fossil birds have been found by Hou Lianhai, Hu Yaoming, Wang Ping, Gu Yucai and Sun Yutie in the Yixian Formation of Beipiao, Liaoning Province. The new locality is about 3 km southwest of that of Confuciusorins . Among those specimens were two of Confuciusorins and two new birds. A well-developed carina was found on the smallest specimen, a feature not found in the Jurassic birds, such as Archaeopteryx and Confuc...
32 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 1996in Journal of Paleontology 1.35
Thomas R. Holtz11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Maryland, College Park)
tor's descendants." Bryant (1994) noted that, while the first two definition types will always be stable, apomorphy-based definitions are potentially confusing if that derived character is found to occur in more than one lineage (i.e., is homoplastic). Under the phylogenetic system of taxonomy, definitions of taxon names are independent with respect to previous diagnosis (as particular character states may be found to occur in other
42 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 1995in Nature 41.58
Lianhai Hou8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
ZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsAlan Feduccia22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
DISCOVERY Of avian remains close to the age of Archaeopteryx in the Liaoning Province of northeastern China provides the earliest evidence for a beaked, edentulous bird. The associated wing skeleton retains the primitive pattern found in Archaeopteryx, including a manus with unfused carpal elements and long digits. Two leg skeletons from the same site also show an Archaeopteryx level of morphology, and provide the earliest indisputable evidence for a covering of body contour feathers, These spec...
122 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 1995in Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 1.32
Patrick E. Smith13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Norman M. Evensen11
Estimated H-index: 11
+ 5 AuthorsDale A. Russell16
Estimated H-index: 16
The correlation of freshwater sediments in small, fault-bound basins in Liaoning Province, northeast China, known as the Jehol (or Rehe) Group, has been a subject of debate for many years, with biochronological estimates ranging from Late Jurassic to the Cretaceous periods. We have applied the laser 40Ar–39Ar technique to volcanic intercalations and lacustrine sediments from the Yixian Formation at the base of the Jehol Group. Minerals and whole-rock chips from the upper parts of the Yixian Form...
85 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 1994in Journal of Paleontology 1.35
Thomas R. Holtz11
Estimated H-index: 11
(United States Geological Survey)
ABsTRACr-Tyrannosaurids are a well-supported clade of very large predatory dinosaurs of Late Cretaceous Asiamerica. Traditional dinosaurian systematics place these animals within the infraorder Carosauria with the other large theropods (allosaurids, megalosaurids). A new cladistic analysis indicates that the tyrannosaurs were in fact derived members of the Coelurosauria, a group of otherwise small theropods. Despite certain gross cranial similarities with the large predators of the Jurassic and ...
205 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 1993in Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 1.32
Zhi-Ming Dong1
Estimated H-index: 1
The discovery of an Early Cretaceous bird from the Ordos Basin of Inner Mongolia (People's Republic of China) is reported. The specimen, collected by the Dinosaur Project (China – Canada – Alberta – Ex Terra) Expedition of 1990, includes scapulocoracoids, humeri, radii, ulnae and metacarpals. It is referred to the Enantiornithes.
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 14, 1992in Science 41.06
Paul C. Sereno46
Estimated H-index: 46
(University of Chicago),
Rao Chenggang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(American Museum of Natural History)
Fossil bird skeletons discovered in Lower Cretaceous lake deposits in China shed new light on the early evolution of avian flight and perching. The 135 million-year-old sparrow-sized skeletons represent a new avian, Sinornis santensis , n. gen. n. sp., that preserves striking primitive features such as a flexible manus with unguals, a footed pubis, and stomach ribs (gastralia). In contrast to Archaeoperyx , however, Sinornis exhibits advanced features such as a broad sternum, wing-folding mechan...
129 Citations Source Cite
Cited By407
Newest
Published on Apr 25, 2019in Scientific Reports 4.12
Rui Qiu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Xiaolin Wang33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 3 AuthorsYiyun Ma (Capital Normal University)
Caudipteridae is a basal clade of Oviraptorosauria, all known species from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota of northeastern China. They were one of the first feathered dinosaur groups discovered, and possessed avian-like pennaceous remiges and rectrices. Their discovery provided significant information on early oviraptorosaurian evolution and the origins of birds and feathers. Here we describe a new caudipterid species Xingtianosaurus ganqi gen. et sp. nov. from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Forma...
Source Cite
Daria Kiseleva , Oleg Shilovsky (Kazan Federal University)+ 4 AuthorsNadezhda Cherednichenko
Abstract The Kotelnich vertebrate fossil site, one of the richest of the Permian period, is characterised by the excellent preservation of fossil remains due to their burial in a silty anaerobic environment similar to modern peat bogs. The aim of the work is to carry out a comprehensive study of the composition and structure of bone fragments of the Permian parareptile Deltavjatia vjatkensis , as well as that of its embedding rocks, to support further paleoecological and fossilisation reconstruc...
Source Cite
Published on Jan 4, 2019in Lethaia 2.22
Zuohuan Qin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(China University of Geosciences),
Dangpeng Xi2
Estimated H-index: 2
(China University of Geosciences)
+ 5 AuthorsWANXiaoqiao14
Estimated H-index: 14
(China University of Geosciences)
Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Trends in Ecology and Evolution 15.94
Source Cite
Published on May 2, 2019in PLOS Computational Biology 3.96
Yaser Saffar Talori (Tsinghua University), Jing-Shan Zhao (Tsinghua University)+ 3 AuthorsJingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
The origin of avian flight is one of the most controversial debates in Paleontology. This paper investigates the wing performance of Caudipteryx, the most basal non-volant dinosaur with pennaceous feathered forelimbs by using modal effective mass theory. From a mechanical standpoint, the forced vibrations excited by hindlimb locomotion stimulate the movement of wings, creating a flapping-like motion in response. This shows that the origin of the avian flight stroke should lie in a completely nat...
Source Cite
Yanhong Pan13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Wenxia Zheng10
Estimated H-index: 10
(North Carolina State University)
+ 13 AuthorsTao Zhao1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Dinosaur fossils possessing integumentary appendages of various morphologies, interpreted as feathers, have greatly enhanced our understanding of the evolutionary link between birds and dinosaurs, as well as the origins of feathers and avian flight. In extant birds, the unique expression and amino acid composition of proteins in mature feathers have been shown to determine their biomechanical properties, such as hardness, resilience, and plasticity. Here, we provide molecular and ultrastructural...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 12, 2019in Frontiers of Earth Science in China
Federico L. Agnolin17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Matías J. Motta1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsFernando E. Novas29
Estimated H-index: 29
Recent years witnessed the discovery of a great diversity of early birds as well as closely related non-avian theropods, which modified previous conceptions about the origin of birds and their flight. We here present a review of currently the taxonomic composition and main anatomical characteristics of those theropod families closely related with early birds, with the aim to analyze and discuss main phylogenetic hypotheses that compete some topics about the non-avian dinosaur-bird transition. We...
Source Cite
Published on Feb 11, 2019in Systematic Biology 8.52
Joyce C Havstad (Oakland University), N. Adam Smith10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Clemson University)
Source Cite
Published on Feb 6, 2019in PLOS ONE 2.77
Sungjin Lee , Yuong-Nam Lee14
Estimated H-index: 14
+ 3 AuthorsKhishigjav Tsogtbaatar11
Estimated H-index: 11
Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Science China-earth Sciences 2.06
Dangpeng Xi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(China University of Geosciences),
WANXiaoqiao14
Estimated H-index: 14
(China University of Geosciences)
+ 1 AuthorsLIGang16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Cretaceous strata are widely distributed across China and record a variety of depositional settings. The sedimentary facies consist primarily of terrestrial, marine and interbedded marine-terrestrial deposits, of which marine and interbedded facies are relatively limited. Based a thorough review of the subdivisions and correlations of Cretaceous strata in China, we provide an up-to-date integrated chronostratigraphy and geochronologic framework of the Cretaceous system and its deposits in China....
1 Citations Source Cite