Two feathered dinosaurs from northeastern China

Published on Jun 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
· DOI :10.1038/31635
Ji Qiang10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Geological Museum of China),
Philip J. Currie45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Royal Tyrrell Museum)
+ 1 AuthorsJi Shu-an2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Royal Tyrrell Museum)
Abstract
Current controversy over the origin and early evolution of birds centres on whether or not they are derived from coelurosaurian theropod dinosaurs. Here we describe two theropods from the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous Chaomidianzi Formation of Liaoning province, China. Although both theropods have feathers, It Is likely that neither was able to fly. Phylogenetic analysis Indicates that they are both more primitive than the earliest known avlalan (bird), Archaeopteryx. These new fossils represent stages In the evolution of birds from feathered, ground-living, blpedal dinosaurs.
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References15
Published on Mar 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Luis M. Chiappe42
Estimated H-index: 42
(American Museum of Natural History),
Mark A. Norell53
Estimated H-index: 53
(American Museum of Natural History),
James M. Clark35
Estimated H-index: 35
(George Washington University)
In joint expeditions, researchers from the American Museum of Natural History and the Mongolian Academy of Sciences have recovered over 20 alvarezsaurid (Theropoda: Aves) specimens in the Late Cretaceous beds of Mongolia's Gobi Desert'. Here we describe a new taxon that is closely related to Mononykvl'. This new taxon is represented by two exquisitely preserved skulls-the first known. for Alvarezsauridae-details of which support the theory that the group is related to birds. This theory was firs...
82 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Pei-ji Chen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Academia Sinica),
Zhiming Dong12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Academia Sinica),
Shuo-nan Zhen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(American Museum of Natural History)
Two spectacular fossilized dinosaur skeletons were recently discovered in Liaoning in northeastern China. Here we describe the two nearly complete skeletons of a small theropod that represent a species closely related to Compsognathus. Sinosauropteryx has the longest tail of any known theropod, and a three-fingered hand dominated by the first finger, which is longer and thicker than either of the bones of the forearm. Both specimens have interesting integumentary structures that could provide in...
468 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 1994in Journal of Paleontology 1.35
Thomas R. Holtz9
Estimated H-index: 9
(United States Geological Survey)
ABsTRACr-Tyrannosaurids are a well-supported clade of very large predatory dinosaurs of Late Cretaceous Asiamerica. Traditional dinosaurian systematics place these animals within the infraorder Carosauria with the other large theropods (allosaurids, megalosaurids). A new cladistic analysis indicates that the tyrannosaurs were in fact derived members of the Coelurosauria, a group of otherwise small theropods. Despite certain gross cranial similarities with the large predators of the Jurassic and ...
203 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 1988in Nature 41.58
J. L. Sanz12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
J.F. Bonapartet1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
A. Lacasa1
Estimated H-index: 1
The Neocomian Spanish outcrops of Montsec (province of Lerida) and the new one of Las Hoyas (province of Cuenca) have yielded several avian remains in the last few years. Several isolated feathers have been reported from Montsec, and a specimen of some feathered wing bones has recently been found. Las Hoyas has yielded an isolated feather and a nearly articulated small fossil bird that lacks the skull. This new specimen, reported here, presents a combination of derived (strut-like coracoids, pyg...
69 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 1985in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Evgeny N. Kurochkin1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract A partial, associated skeleton with feather impressions of a bird from early Cretaceous (Neocomian) deposits in Mongolia constitutes a new family and order (Ambiortidae, Ambiortiformes). The specimen presents a mosaic of archaic and specialised characters within the Class Aves and shows that advanced carinate birds existed some 10 to 12 million years after Archaeopteryx , lending tentative support to the idea that Archaeopteryx may not be representative of the state of avian evolution i...
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Published on Oct 1, 1995in Nature 41.58
Lianhai Hou8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Larry D. Martin28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Kansas),
Alan Feduccia21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
DISCOVERY Of avian remains close to the age of Archaeopteryx in the Liaoning Province of northeastern China provides the earliest evidence for a beaked, edentulous bird. The associated wing skeleton retains the primitive pattern found in Archaeopteryx, including a manus with unfused carpal elements and long digits. Two leg skeletons from the same site also show an Archaeopteryx level of morphology, and provide the earliest indisputable evidence for a covering of body contour feathers, These spec...
121 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 20, 1998in Science 41.06
Catherine A. Forster28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Stony Brook University),
Scott D. Sampson25
Estimated H-index: 25
+ 1 AuthorsDavid W. Krause33
Estimated H-index: 33
A partial skeleton of a primitive bird, Rahona ostromi , gen. et sp. nov., has been discovered from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. This specimen, although exhibiting avian features such as a reversed hallux and ulnar papillae, retains characteristics that indicate a theropod ancestry, including a pubic foot and hyposphene-hypantra vertebral articulations. Rahona has a robust, hyperextendible second digit on the hind foot that terminates in a sicklelike claw, a unique characteristic of the th...
220 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 1993in Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 1.32
Zhi-Ming Dong1
Estimated H-index: 1
The discovery of an Early Cretaceous bird from the Ordos Basin of Inner Mongolia (People's Republic of China) is reported. The specimen, collected by the Dinosaur Project (China – Canada – Alberta – Ex Terra) Expedition of 1990, includes scapulocoracoids, humeri, radii, ulnae and metacarpals. It is referred to the Enantiornithes.
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 1997in Chinese Science Bulletin
Lianhai Hou8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
AFTER the publication of the fossil bird Confuciusorins , additional skeletons of fossil birds have been found by Hou Lianhai, Hu Yaoming, Wang Ping, Gu Yucai and Sun Yutie in the Yixian Formation of Beipiao, Liaoning Province. The new locality is about 3 km southwest of that of Confuciusorins . Among those specimens were two of Confuciusorins and two new birds. A well-developed carina was found on the smallest specimen, a feature not found in the Jurassic birds, such as Archaeopteryx and Confuc...
32 Citations Source Cite
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Cited By402
Published on Jul 1, 1999in Nature 41.58
Zhexi Luo1
Estimated H-index: 1
The Yixian Formation in China's Liaoning Province has yielded many spectacular fossils — notably, several remarkably complete feathered dinosaurs. Yet its age has been controversial. Accurate radiometric dating now shows unambiguously that these beds are from the Early Cretaceous, providing a new temporal calibration for assessing the evolution of animal and plant life from that period.
41 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2009in Comptes Rendus Palevol 1.43
Kevin Padian31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of California, Berkeley)
Published on Jan 1, 2002in Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 1.89
Teresa Maryańska3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Halszka Osmólska10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Mieczysław Wolsan14
Estimated H-index: 14
Oviraptorosauria is a clade of Cretaceous theropod dinosaurs of uncertain affinities within Maniraptoriformes. All pre− vious phylogenetic analyses placed oviraptorosaurs outside a close relationship to birds (Avialae), recognizing Dromaeo− sauridae or Troodontidae, or a clade containing these two taxa (Deinonychosauria), as sister taxon to birds. Here we pres− ent the results of a phylogenetic analysis using 195 characters scored for four outgroup and 13 maniraptoriform (ingroup) terminal taxa,...
52 Citations
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Scientific Reports 4.12
Junchang Lü16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Hanyong Pu5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 7 AuthorsCaizhi Shen5
Estimated H-index: 5
The Ganzhou area of Jiangxi Province, southern China is becoming one of the most productive oviraptorosaurian localities in the world. A new oviraptorid dinosaur was unearthed from the uppermost Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Ganzhou area. It is characterized by an anterodorsally sloping occiput and quadrate (a feature shared with Citipati), a circular supratemporal fenestra that is much smaller than the lower temporal fenestra, and a dentary in which the dorsal margin above the external...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 13, 1998in Science 41.06
Thomas R. Holtz9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Maryland, College Park)
The dinosaurs called theropods--a group that includes allosaurs and velociraptors--have been in the news lately because of their role in the debate over the origins of birds and avian flight. But there is much more to the theropod story, as Holtz discusses in his Perspective. [ Sereno et al .][1] report in the same issue the discovery of a new variety of spinosaur, a type of theropod, whose skull has features very similar to those of crocodiles. With an elongated snout and conical teeth, this sp...
25 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Kevin Padian31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of California, Berkeley)
Birds were once thought to have a large number of features exclusive to the group. One by one those features have also been identified in fossils of certain theropod dinosaurs. Now feathers join the list.
29 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2000in Nature 41.58
Rex Dalton R17
Estimated H-index: 17
Stunning fossils from Liaoning province have created a boom for Chinese palaeontologists and local farmers alike. Rex Dalton reports from the wild frontier where researchers do battle with the black market.
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 1998in Nature 41.58
Neil H. Shubin36
Estimated H-index: 36
(University of Pennsylvania)
A newly described 334-million-year-old fossil of an amphibian will give students of vertebrate evolution much to think about, for it has characters that were previously ascribed to three different types of early four-legged creature. Together with other examples, the fossil shows that during evolution new features seem to have been 'cut and pasted' on different groups at different times. Understanding such parallel evolution will require understanding the molecular and developmental basis by whi...
15 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 17, 1998in Science 41.06
Sharon M. Swartz28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Brown University)
Taking Wing: Archaeopteryx and the Evolution of Bird Flight. By Pat Shipman . Simon and Schuster, New York, 1998. 336 pp. illus. $25 or C$35. ISBN 0-684-81131-6.
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2000in Nature 41.58
Terry D. Jones9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Oregon State University),
James O. Farlow17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne)
+ 2 AuthorsWillem J. Hillenius11
Estimated H-index: 11
(College of Charleston)
Modern birds have markedly foreshortened tails and their body mass is centred anteriorly, near the wings1,2,3,4,5. To provide stability during powered flight, the avian centre of mass is far from the pelvis, which poses potential balance problems for cursorial birds. To compensate, avians adapted to running maintain the femur subhorizontally, with its distal end situated anteriorly, close to the animal's centre of mass; stride generation stems largely from parasagittal rotation of the lower leg ...
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