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Preventing overtraining in athletes in high-intensity sports and stress/recovery monitoring.

Published on Sep 14, 2010in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports 3.62
· DOI :10.1111/j.1600-0838.2010.01192.x
Michael Kellmann22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Abstract
In sports, the importance of optimizing the recovery–stress state is critical. Effective recovery from intense training loads often faced by elite athletes can often determine sporting success or failure. In recent decades, athletes, coaches, and sport scientists have been keen to find creative, new methods for improving the quality and quantity of training for athletes. These efforts have consistently faced barriers, including overtraining, fatigue, injury, illness, and burnout. Physiological and psychological limits dictate a need for research that addresses the avoidance of overtraining, maximizes recovery, and successfully negotiates the fine line between high and excessive training loads. Monitoring instruments like the Recovery–Stress Questionnaire for Athletes can assist with this research by providing a tool to assess their perceived state of recovery. This article will highlight the importance of recovery for elite athletes and provide an overview of monitoring instruments.
  • References (32)
  • Citations (171)
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References32
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2009in Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 3.93
M. Simjanovic1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Sue L. Hooper18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Queensland Academy of Sport)
+ 2 AuthorsSteven Rynne10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Post-exercise recovery techniques are being used increasingly in elite sport, but scientific study in this area is only emerging. The aim of this study was to collect information on the use and perceived effectiveness of the different recovery techniques used with athletes. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 Queensland Academy of Sport coaches and other high-performance coaches from seven sports (three team sports and four individual sports). The interview questions sought to exam...
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2009in International Journal of Sports Medicine 2.45
Edith Filaire20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
M. Rouveix10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
M. Duclos2
Estimated H-index: 2
11 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2008in Journal of Sports Sciences 2.73
Paul G. Montgomery8
Estimated H-index: 8
(AIS: Australian Institute of Sport),
David B. Pyne52
Estimated H-index: 52
(AIS: Australian Institute of Sport)
+ 3 AuthorsClare Leslie Minahan17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Griffith University)
Abstract To evaluate the effectiveness of recovery strategies on physical performance during a 3-day tournament style basketball competition, 29 male players (mean age 19.1 years, s = 2.1; height 1.84 m, s = 0.34; body mass 88.5 kg, s = 14.7) were assigned to one of three treatment groups: carbohydrate + stretching (7.7 g · kg −1 · day −1, s = 1.7; ‘n = 9), cold water immersion (11°C, 5 × 1; n = 10) or full leg compression garments (18 mmHg, ∼18 h; n = 10). Effects of the recovery strategies on ...
124 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2008in International Journal of Sports Medicine 2.45
Joanna Vaile10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Shona L. Halson26
Estimated H-index: 26
+ 1 AuthorsBrian Dawson50
Estimated H-index: 50
Abstract The present study investigated the effects of three hydrotherapy interventions on next day performance recovery following strenuous training. Twelve cyclists completed four experimental trials differing only in 14-min recovery intervention: cold water immersion (CWI), hot water immersion (HWI), contrast water therapy (CWT), or passive recovery (PAS). Each trial comprised five consecutive exercise days of 105-min duration, including 66 maximal effort sprints. Additionally, subjects perfo...
115 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 10, 2008
Sean Oliver Richardson1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Mark B. Andersen28
Estimated H-index: 28
,
Tony Morris21
Estimated H-index: 21
Chapter 1. Introduction and Background Chapter 2. How Big Is It? Prevalence and Manifestation of Overtraining Chapter 3. What Brings It On? Risk Factors for Overtraining Chapter 4. Coaches' and Sport Scientists' Views on Risk Factors Chapter 5. Burnt Cookies: Conversations with an Exercise Physiologist Chapter 6. Sport Systems Can Damage: Conversations with a Sport Psychologist Chapter 7. The Pathogenic World of Professional Sport: Steve's Tale Chapter 8. A Case of Olympic Seduction: John's Tale...
21 Citations
Published on Dec 1, 2007in Journal of Sports Sciences 2.73
S. John Williams1
Estimated H-index: 1
(AIS: Australian Institute of Sport),
Lawrence R. Kendall2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UTAS: University of Tasmania)
Abstract A major objective of sports scientists and elite coaches is the enhancement of athletic performance. Despite this common goal, there is a general perception that research in sports science does not meet the needs of coaches. A study using survey and interview examined the perceptions of elite coaches and sports science researchers in Australia regarding the research needs of elite coaching. Congruence was found between coaches and researchers regarding research practice at the elite lev...
82 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2007in International Journal of Sports Medicine 2.45
Aaron J. Coutts47
Estimated H-index: 47
,
Lee Wallace9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Katie M. Slattery13
Estimated H-index: 13
The present investigation compared responses in previously identified physiological, biochemical, and psychological markers of overreaching in triathletes. Sixteen experienced male triathletes (VO 2max [mean ± SD] = 55.7 ± 4.9 mL.kg -1 .min -I , age = 31.3 ± 11.7 yr) were divided into matched groups according to physical and performance characteristics, and were randomly assigned to either intensified training (IT) or normal training (NT) groups. Physiological, biochemical, and psychological mea...
134 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2007
Michael Kellmann22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
Anne-Marie Elbe1
Estimated H-index: 1
1 Citations
Published on Dec 1, 2006in Journal of Sports Sciences 2.73
M. Bouget4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Mathieu Rouveix2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 2 AuthorsEdith Filaire20
Estimated H-index: 20
Abstract In this study, we examined the effect of rapidly increased training volume and intensity on hormonal responses (salivary cortisol [C] and urinary dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate [DHEA-S]) and recovery-stress state perceived by 12 female cyclists. Over the 4-day experimental period, there was an average increase in training load of approximately 122% compared with that during the previous 12 days. Scores on subscales of the Recovery Stress Questionnaire for Athletes increased for the som...
41 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2006in European Journal of Sport Science 2.58
Göran Kenttä13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Peter Hassmén30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Stockholm University),
John S. Raglin24
Estimated H-index: 24
(IU: Indiana University Bloomington)
Eleven elite kayakers performed an identical weekly training schedule each week during a 3-week training-camp. The Profile of Mood States (POMS) inventory (‘‘right now’’ instructions) was completed ...
52 Citations Source Cite
Cited By171
Newest
Published on Jan 13, 2019in European Journal of Sport Science 2.58
Marvin Gaudino2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Guillaume Martinent13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Lyon)
+ 1 AuthorsMichel Nicolas8
Estimated H-index: 8
AbstractObjectives: The aim of this study was to: (a) examine the time courses of runners’ recovery-stress states within the month following a demanding Mountain Ultra-Marathon (MUM) race; and (b) explore the role of primary and secondary appraisals in these trajectories. Design: A seven-wave one-month longitudinal design was used with one measurement point within two days before the race to measure appraisals and six time points within the month following the race to assess recovery-stress stat...
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Published on Jun 1, 2019in Science & Sports 0.76
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Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 3.93
Suzanna Russell1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Queensland Academy of Sport),
David G. Jenkins45
Estimated H-index: 45
(UQ: University of Queensland)
+ 2 AuthorsVincent G. Kelly8
Estimated H-index: 8
(QUT: Queensland University of Technology)
Mental fatigue resulting from prolonged periods of demanding cognitive activity, has been found to impair endurance exercise performance and performance in some sport-specific tasks. The application of such research to the elite sporting environment however is limited. This article reviews the literature relevant to mental fatigue and team sporting performance with aim to provide perspectives on the transferability and significance of currently available evidence to the applied elite sporting co...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2019in British Journal of Sports Medicine 7.87
Claudia L. Reardon11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison),
Brian Hainline15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Philippines National Collegiate Athletic Association)
+ 24 AuthorsAlan Currie1
Estimated H-index: 1
Mental health symptoms and disorders are common among elite athletes, may have sport related manifestations within this population and impair performance. Mental health cannot be separated from physical health, as evidenced by mental health symptoms and disorders increasing the risk of physical injury and delaying subsequent recovery. There are no evidence or consensus based guidelines for diagnosis and management of mental health symptoms and disorders in elite athletes. Diagnosis must differen...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 13, 2019in European Journal of Sport Science 2.58
Suzanna Russell1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Queensland Academy of Sport),
David G. Jenkins45
Estimated H-index: 45
(UQ: University of Queensland)
+ 2 AuthorsVincent G. Kelly8
Estimated H-index: 8
(QUT: Queensland University of Technology)
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