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Language socialization across learning spaces

Published on Jan 1, 2015
· DOI :10.1002/9781118531242.ch19
Jin Sook Lee2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Mary Bucholtz28
Estimated H-index: 28
Cite
Abstract
Language Socialization Across Learning Spaces Jin Sook Lee and Mary Bucholtz 1. Introduction Learning to think, act, and speak like an expert in specific physical, temporal, cultural, and ideological spaces is a necessity to function successfully in any community. A primary way that humans become socialized to act and interact in culturally appropriate ways is through the use of language. Language socialization (LS) refers to the process by which individuals acquire, reproduce, and transform the knowledge and competence that enable them to ­participate appropriately within specific communities of language users. Thus, LS is fundamental to social life, given that all community members engage in practices of LS at numerous points in their lives, whether as relative experts or as relative novices. Within LS research, language is regarded as a ‘dynamic social practice’ that is constantly ‘contested’ and ‘in flux’ among its users (Duff and Talmy 2011, p. 96). LS thus offers a ­theoretical and methodological framework for understanding how linguistic and cultural competence are developed through everyday interactions within communities of practice. Based in the traditions of human development and linguistic anthropology, LS is concerned with both ‘socialization through the use of language and socialization to use language’ (Schieffelin and Ochs 1986, p. 163). LS researchers take a cross‐cultural perspective to make visible the intersections between language and culture in the processes of learning and teaching. Such a perspective not only recognizes the existence of biological and psychological attributes in these processes but also importantly acknowledges considerable variations due to cultural factors and sociohistorical conditions (Garrett and Baquedano‐Lopez 2002, p. 341). In addition, because of its concern with cultural specificity, scholarship on LS pays close attention to how socialization occurs in culturally meaningful learning spaces, and how these practices may be linked or kept apart across different kinds of spaces. This chapter first presents a brief overview of the theoretical principles and method­ ological approaches employed in LS research (see also Duff and Anderson, this volume). To illustrate this framework and particularly the pivotal role of learning spaces within LS, the chapter then discusses how a university–high school educational partnership offers students opportunities to gain a new perspective on LS as ethnographers of language and culture in The Handbook of Classroom Discourse and Interaction, First Edition. Edited by Numa Markee. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Published 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  • References (32)
  • Citations (2)
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References32
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2014in Language and Linguistics Compass
Mary Bucholtz28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara),
Audrey Lopez1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara)
+ 3 AuthorsShawn Warner-Garcia1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara)
Language and Linguistics Compass 8/4 (2014): 144–157, 10.1111/lnc3.12070 Sociolinguistic Justice in the Schools: Student Researchers as Linguistic Experts Mary Bucholtz*, Audrey Lopez, Allina Mojarro, Elena Skapoulli, Chris VanderStouwe and Shawn Warner-Garcia University of California, Santa Barbara Abstract The commitment of sociocultural linguistics to the cause of social justice has been central to the discipline since its foundation. This commitment is nowhere more evident than in the educat...
Published on Apr 1, 2012in Educational Researcher 3.39
Django Paris5
Estimated H-index: 5
(MSU: Michigan State University)
Seventeen years ago Gloria Ladson-Billings (1995) published the landmark article “Toward a Theory of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy,” giving a coherent theoretical statement for resource pedagogies that had been building throughout the 1970s and 1980s. I, like countless teachers and university-based researchers, have been inspired by what it means to make teaching and learning relevant and responsive to the languages, literacies, and cultural practices of students across categories of difference a...
Published on Nov 23, 2011
Marjorie Harness Goodwin32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
Amy Kyratzis12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara)
Published on Nov 23, 2011
Amy L. Paugh6
Estimated H-index: 6
(JMU: James Madison University)
Published on Nov 23, 2011
Elinor Ochs36
Estimated H-index: 36
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
B. B. Schiefellin23
Estimated H-index: 23
(NYU: New York University)
Published on Nov 1, 2011in Journal of Language Identity and Education 0.74
Jin Sook Lee2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara),
Laura Hill-Bonnet1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Stanford University),
Jason Raley4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara)
In settings where speakers of two or more different languages coexist, language brokering, the act of interpreting and translating between culturally and linguistically different speakers, is commonly practiced. Yet the examination of language brokering and its implications in classroom settings have not received much attention in the literature. The purpose of this study is to better understand how language brokering functions as an organizational tool in dual immersion classroom interactions t...
Published on Jul 14, 2011
Patricia Baquedano-López11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of California, Berkeley),
Sera Jean Hernandez3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of California, Berkeley)
Published on Oct 21, 2010in Annual Review of Anthropology 2.70
E. Summerson Carr4
Estimated H-index: 4
(U of C: University of Chicago)
Every society recognizes expertise, and anthropologists have long documented the culturally and historically specific practices that constitute it. The anthropology of expertise focuses on what people do rather than what people possess, even in the many circumstances where the former is naturalized as the latter. Across its many domains, expertise is both inherently interactional, involving the participation of objects, producers, and consumers of knowledge, and inescapably ideological, implicat...
Published on Jan 1, 2009in Science Education 2.90
Pei-Ling Hsu10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UVic: University of Victoria),
Wolff-Michael Roth63
Estimated H-index: 63
(UVic: University of Victoria)
Apprenticeship and the associated support mechanism of scaffolding have received considerable interest by educational researchers as ways of inducting students into science. Most studies treat scaffolding as a one-way process, where the expert supports the development of the novice. However, if social processes generally and conversations specifically are dialogical in nature then we would expect to observe two-way processes. The purpose of this paper is to report the results of an ethnographic ...
Cited By2
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Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Second Language Writing 4.20
Debra A. Friedman5
Estimated H-index: 5
(IU: Indiana University)
Abstract Using the theoretical framework of language socialization, this paper investigates the local contexts in which four international students were initiated into citation during their first semester in a Masters in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (MA-TESOL) program. Drawing from 38 hours of observation and audiotaping in two teaching methods courses, interviews with instructors and students, and students’ texts, it situates students’ citation practices within the discourses...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Linguistics and Education 1.52
Tim Anderson5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UVic: University of Victoria)
Abstract This article examines the internal and external academic discourse socialization of seven Chinese PhD students at a large Canadian university. Through the use of interviews, participant-generated written narratives, and discussion of written feedback, this longitudinal multiple case study uncovered multiple and complex factors facilitating students’ socialization into local practices, discourses, and communities during their doctoral study. This article highlights the disciplinary role ...