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The Association Between Physical Function and Lifestyle Activity and Exercise in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study
Published on Apr 1, 2004in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 4.16
· DOI :10.1111/j.1532-5415.2004.52154.x
Jennifer S. Brach43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of California, San Francisco),
Eleanor Marie Simonsick88
Estimated H-index: 88
(University of California, San Francisco)
+ 2 AuthorsAnne B. Newman27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of California, San Francisco)
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether older adults who exercise demonstrate higher levels of physical function than those who do not exercise but are physically active throughout the day. DESIGN: Cross-sectional examination of baseline data from the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) study. SETTING: Health ABC field centers in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Memphis, Tennessee. PARTICIPANTS: Three thousand seventy-five well-functioning black and white men and women aged 70 to 79. MEASUREMENTS: Physical activity and exercise were assessed using a modified leisure-time physical activity questionnaire. Participants were classified as inactive (reporting 2,719 kcal/wk of total physical activity), or exerciser (reporting≥ 1,000 kcal/wk of exercise activity). Physical function measures included the Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE) battery, the Health ABC battery, a 400-m walk test, and isokinetic strength testing of the knee extensors. RESULTS: The lifestyle active and exerciser groups had similar total activity levels (men: 6,135 kcal/wk and 6,734 kcal/wk, respectively; P =.108; women: 5,695 kcal/wk and 5,854 kcal/wk, respectively; P =.335). When examining lower extremity performance in relation to physical activity, a progressive trend was evident, with the inactive individuals most likely to have impaired performance on the EPESE battery (men: 33.7%, 24.3%, and 19.1%, P<.001; women: 49.9%, 37.3%, and 28.4%, P<.001; inactive, lifestyle active, and exerciser, respectively). Progressive trends of similar magnitude were present for the Health ABC battery, time to walk 400 m, and knee extensor strength. In multivariate linear regression, those in the inactive and lifestyle active groups had poorer scores on the Health ABC performance battery than individuals in the exercise group after controlling for demographic factors and prevalent disease (men: inactive β = -0.27, P <.001, lifestyle active β = -0.07, P =.032; women: inactive β = -0.23, P <.001, lifestyle active β = -0.07, P <.059). After controlling for demographic factors and prevalent disease, the lifestyle active and exercisers had similar proportions of functionally limited older persons (scoring < 10 on the EPESE battery). CONCLUSION: Older adults who participate in 20 to 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise on most days of the week have better physical function than older persons who are active throughout the day or who are inactive. Any type of physical activity is better than no activity for protection against functional limitations, but exercise confers greater benefit for physical capacity. J Am Geriatr Soc 52:502-509, 2004.
  • References (14)
  • Cited By (309)
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References14
Published on Jan 1, 1989
Steven N. Blair136
Estimated H-index: 136
,
H. W. Kohl24
Estimated H-index: 24
+ 3 AuthorsLarry W. Gibbons28
Estimated H-index: 28
968 Citations
Published on Aug 1, 1995in Gerontologist 4.08
Daniel O. Clark26
Estimated H-index: 26
86 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 16, 1996in The New England Journal of Medicine 79.26
Paul T. Williams39
Estimated H-index: 39
Background Official guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention assert that the majority of health benefits from physical activity are obtained by walking 2 miles (3.2 km) briskly most days of the week (the energy equivalent of running 8 to 12 km per week). The objective of our study was to examine the dose–response relation in women between risk factors for coronary heart disease, particularly the concentration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and vigorous exerc...
177 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2003in Acc Current Journal Review
Mihaela Tanasescu6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Harvard University),
Michael F. Leitzmann77
Estimated H-index: 77
+ 3 AuthorsFrank B. Hu200
Estimated H-index: 200
MULTIPLE EPIDEMIOLOGIC studies have shown an inverse relationship between physical activity andriskof coronaryheartdisease (CHD). Sedentary individuals have almost twice the risk of CHD as those performing high-intensity exercise. However, the optimal level of exercise for preventing CHD is unclear. In some studies, the reduction in risk from increased levels of activity appeared to be linear up to a certain level above which there was no further benefit; in others, the effect was restricted to ...
599 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 16, 1995in JAMA 47.66
Paul T. Williams39
Estimated H-index: 39
To the Editor. —The Special Communication by Dr Pate and colleagues 1 provides an important message to sedentary adults. However, I believe that further explanation is required of their Figures 1 and 2 and the recommendation's contradiction with research that supports more vigorous activity. Their Figure 1 shows a diminishing return in health benefit with increasing exercise level. Measurement of the illustrated curvilinear plot shows a 12-fold greater health benefit from increasing physical act...
2,366 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 23, 2002in JAMA 47.66
Mihaela Tanasescu6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Michael F. Leitzmann77
Estimated H-index: 77
+ 3 AuthorsFrank B. Hu200
Estimated H-index: 200
ContextStudies have shown an inverse relationship between exercise and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but data on type and intensity are sparse.ObjectiveTo assess the amount, type, and intensity of physical activity in relation to risk of CHD among men.Design, Setting, and ParticipantsA cohort of 44 452 US men enrolled in the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study, followed up at 2-year intervals from 1986 through January 31, 1998, to assess potential CHD risk factors, identify newly diagn...
467 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 8, 1996in JAMA Internal Medicine 19.99
Carlos J. Crespo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Steven Keteyian22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Henry Ford Health System)
+ 1 AuthorsChristopher T. Sempos55
Estimated H-index: 55
(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Background: The prevalence of no leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) among US adults is estimated to be between 24% and 30%. Such information, however, usually does not include prevalence estimates for non-Hispanic blacks, Mexican Americans, and the elderly. Objective: To assess the prevalence of participation in leisure-time physical activity among US adults. Methods: Between 1988 and 1991, 9488 adults aged 20 years and older were interviewed in their home as part of the third National Health...
422 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1998in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 4.29
Michael L. Pollock55
Estimated H-index: 55
,
Glenn A. Gaesser30
Estimated H-index: 30
+ 4 AuthorsCarol Ewing Garber18
Estimated H-index: 18
SUMMARY ACSM Position Stand on The Recommended Quantity and Quality of Exercise for Developing and Maintaining Cardiorespiratory and Muscular Fitness, and Flexibility in Adults. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 30, No. 6, pp. 975-991, 1998. The combination of frequency, intensity, and duration of chronic exercise has been found to be effective for producing a training effect. The interaction of these factors provide the overload stimulus. In general, the lower the stimulus the lower the training ef...
2,530 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1999in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 4.16
Eleanor Marie Simonsick88
Estimated H-index: 88
(National Institutes of Health),
Jack M. Guralnik121
Estimated H-index: 121
(National Institutes of Health),
Linda P. Fried111
Estimated H-index: 111
(Johns Hopkins University)
OBJECTIVES: To determine how severity of walking difficulty and sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related factors influence walking behavior in disabled older women. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analyses of baseline data from the Women's Health and Aging Study (WHAS). SETTING: An urban community encompassing 12 contiguous zip code areas in the eastern portion of Baltimore City and part of Baltimore County, Maryland. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 920 moderately to severely disabled community-resid...
89 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 1994in The Journals of Gerontology
Jack M. Guralnik121
Estimated H-index: 121
(National Institutes of Health),
Eleanor Marie Simonsick88
Estimated H-index: 88
(National Institutes of Health)
+ 5 AuthorsRobert B. Wallace109
Estimated H-index: 109
(University of Iowa)
3,904 Citations Source Cite
Cited By309
Published on Jan 1, 2014
Puttipong Poncumhak1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Thanicha Insorn1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsPeerasak Manota1
Estimated H-index: 1
Background and Objective : When people become aging, it results in a decline in functioning and increases the risk of falls. Previous studies have shown that the lower extremities muscle strength is a major factor. The objective of this study was to investigate predictive ability of the five times sit-to-stand test (FTSST) to indicate the risk of fall in elderly. Methods: The case control study in 28 subjects was consisted of two groups of 14 fallers and 14 non-fallers by asving subject about th...
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Published on Jan 1, 2013
Christopher Guest (Stanford University), Rebecca Smith-Coggins14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Stanford University)
Balancing the demands of a life in academic medicine provides a unique challenge. Physicians are a driven group accustomed to sacrificing sleep, food, and physical activity to achieve their goals. A balanced diet, ample sleep, and physical activity are essential for peak performance. These three fundamental needs are not independent entities but interconnected and interactive. In this chapter the importance of sleep, nutrition, and physical activity for optimal performance will be discussed. Eac...
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Published on Jan 21, 2011
Rudy J. Valentine19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Edward McAuley84
Estimated H-index: 84
+ 2 AuthorsRobert Dantzer91
Estimated H-index: 91
Persistent feelings of fatigue are a widespread complaint reported by older adults, and are associated with detriments in health and quality of life. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the influence of weight status, habitual physical activity and inflammation on perceptions of fatigue in relatively healthy older adults. Methods: One-hundred eighty-two older men and women (age = 69.2±6.7 years, 98 men, 84 women) were assessed for adiposity (body mass index (BMI) and percent fat via ...
Published on Jan 1, 2012
Michelle M. Lusardi1
Estimated H-index: 1
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Although life expectancy is increasing, this often comes at the cost of declining health through an increased incidence of cancer, cardiovascular disease and arthritis in older age. In addition, a decline in muscular performance is commonly observed with increasing age, combining a loss of skeletal muscle (‘sarcopenia’), a decrease in muscle oxidative capacity and a reduction in muscle strength. Research has shown that it is possible to arrest, or even reverse, the changes in muscle mass and oxi...
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Ellinor Nordin1
Estimated H-index: 1
Falls and their consequences among older people are a serious medical and public health problem. Identifying individuals at risk of falling is therefore a major concern. The purpose of this thesis ...
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Published on Jan 1, 2013
Heather M. Buechel4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Kentucky)
OF DISSERTATION CHANGES IN SLEEP ARCHITECTURE AND COGNITION WITH AGE AND PSYCHOSOCIAL STRESS: A STUDY IN FISCHER 344 RATS Changes in both sleep architecture and cognition are common with age. Typically these changes have a negative connotation: sleep fragmentation, insomnia, and deep sleep loss as well as forgetfulness, lack of focus, and even dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Research has shown that psychosocial stressors, such as isolation from family and friends or loss of a loved one can als...
Published on Jan 1, 2014
Pablo Burset Atienza (University of Würzburg)
A flat one atom thick layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice is known as graphene.
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Published on Jul 22, 2009in Brazilian Journal of Biomechanics
Juliana Alves Carneiro1
Estimated H-index: 1
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Maria Sebastiana Silva7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Marcus Fraga Vieira6
Estimated H-index: 6
This study analyzed the effectiveness of two programs of physical exercises (Pilates and weight training) and nutritional orientation in the body weight, in the functional physical capacity and in the kinematic gait of obese women. For twelve weeks, a group of nine obese women participated in a program of aerobic exercises and Pilates method and another group of nine obese women participated in a program of aerobic exercises and weight training. Both groups participated of nutritional orientatio...
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