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The Association Between Physical Function and Lifestyle Activity and Exercise in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

Published on Apr 1, 2004in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 4.16
· DOI :10.1111/j.1532-5415.2004.52154.x
Jennifer S. Brach44
Estimated H-index: 44
(University of California, San Francisco),
Eleanor Marie Simonsick89
Estimated H-index: 89
(University of California, San Francisco)
+ 2 AuthorsA. B. Newman140
Estimated H-index: 140
(University of California, San Francisco)
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether older adults who exercise demonstrate higher levels of physical function than those who do not exercise but are physically active throughout the day. DESIGN: Cross-sectional examination of baseline data from the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) study. SETTING: Health ABC field centers in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Memphis, Tennessee. PARTICIPANTS: Three thousand seventy-five well-functioning black and white men and women aged 70 to 79. MEASUREMENTS: Physical activity and exercise were assessed using a modified leisure-time physical activity questionnaire. Participants were classified as inactive (reporting 2,719 kcal/wk of total physical activity), or exerciser (reporting≥ 1,000 kcal/wk of exercise activity). Physical function measures included the Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE) battery, the Health ABC battery, a 400-m walk test, and isokinetic strength testing of the knee extensors. RESULTS: The lifestyle active and exerciser groups had similar total activity levels (men: 6,135 kcal/wk and 6,734 kcal/wk, respectively; P =.108; women: 5,695 kcal/wk and 5,854 kcal/wk, respectively; P =.335). When examining lower extremity performance in relation to physical activity, a progressive trend was evident, with the inactive individuals most likely to have impaired performance on the EPESE battery (men: 33.7%, 24.3%, and 19.1%, P<.001; women: 49.9%, 37.3%, and 28.4%, P<.001; inactive, lifestyle active, and exerciser, respectively). Progressive trends of similar magnitude were present for the Health ABC battery, time to walk 400 m, and knee extensor strength. In multivariate linear regression, those in the inactive and lifestyle active groups had poorer scores on the Health ABC performance battery than individuals in the exercise group after controlling for demographic factors and prevalent disease (men: inactive β = -0.27, P <.001, lifestyle active β = -0.07, P =.032; women: inactive β = -0.23, P <.001, lifestyle active β = -0.07, P <.059). After controlling for demographic factors and prevalent disease, the lifestyle active and exercisers had similar proportions of functionally limited older persons (scoring < 10 on the EPESE battery). CONCLUSION: Older adults who participate in 20 to 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise on most days of the week have better physical function than older persons who are active throughout the day or who are inactive. Any type of physical activity is better than no activity for protection against functional limitations, but exercise confers greater benefit for physical capacity. J Am Geriatr Soc 52:502-509, 2004.
  • References (14)
  • Citations (309)
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References14
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2003in Acc Current Journal Review
Mihaela Tanasescu6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Harvard University),
Michael F. Leitzmann78
Estimated H-index: 78
+ 3 AuthorsFrank B. Hu202
Estimated H-index: 202
MULTIPLE EPIDEMIOLOGIC studies have shown an inverse relationship between physical activity andriskof coronaryheartdisease (CHD). Sedentary individuals have almost twice the risk of CHD as those performing high-intensity exercise. However, the optimal level of exercise for preventing CHD is unclear. In some studies, the reduction in risk from increased levels of activity appeared to be linear up to a certain level above which there was no further benefit; in others, the effect was restricted to ...
608 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 23, 2002in JAMA 47.66
Mihaela Tanasescu6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Michael F. Leitzmann78
Estimated H-index: 78
+ 3 AuthorsFrank B. Hu202
Estimated H-index: 202
ContextStudies have shown an inverse relationship between exercise and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but data on type and intensity are sparse.ObjectiveTo assess the amount, type, and intensity of physical activity in relation to risk of CHD among men.Design, Setting, and ParticipantsA cohort of 44 452 US men enrolled in the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study, followed up at 2-year intervals from 1986 through January 31, 1998, to assess potential CHD risk factors, identify newly diagn...
485 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1999in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 4.16
Eleanor Marie Simonsick89
Estimated H-index: 89
(National Institutes of Health),
Jack M. Guralnik140
Estimated H-index: 140
(National Institutes of Health),
Linda P. Fried117
Estimated H-index: 117
(Johns Hopkins University)
OBJECTIVES: To determine how severity of walking difficulty and sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related factors influence walking behavior in disabled older women. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analyses of baseline data from the Women's Health and Aging Study (WHAS). SETTING: An urban community encompassing 12 contiguous zip code areas in the eastern portion of Baltimore City and part of Baltimore County, Maryland. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 920 moderately to severely disabled community-resid...
91 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1998in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 4.29
Michael L. Pollock59
Estimated H-index: 59
,
Glenn A. Gaesser38
Estimated H-index: 38
+ 4 AuthorsCarol Ewing Garber28
Estimated H-index: 28
SUMMARY ACSM Position Stand on The Recommended Quantity and Quality of Exercise for Developing and Maintaining Cardiorespiratory and Muscular Fitness, and Flexibility in Adults. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 30, No. 6, pp. 975-991, 1998. The combination of frequency, intensity, and duration of chronic exercise has been found to be effective for producing a training effect. The interaction of these factors provide the overload stimulus. In general, the lower the stimulus the lower the training ef...
2,516 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 16, 1996in The New England Journal of Medicine 79.26
Paul T. Williams49
Estimated H-index: 49
Background Official guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention assert that the majority of health benefits from physical activity are obtained by walking 2 miles (3.2 km) briskly most days of the week (the energy equivalent of running 8 to 12 km per week). The objective of our study was to examine the dose–response relation in women between risk factors for coronary heart disease, particularly the concentration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and vigorous exerc...
182 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 8, 1996in JAMA Internal Medicine 19.99
Carlos J. Crespo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Steven J. Keteyian18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Henry Ford Health System)
+ 1 AuthorsChristopher T. Sempos58
Estimated H-index: 58
(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Background: The prevalence of no leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) among US adults is estimated to be between 24% and 30%. Such information, however, usually does not include prevalence estimates for non-Hispanic blacks, Mexican Americans, and the elderly. Objective: To assess the prevalence of participation in leisure-time physical activity among US adults. Methods: Between 1988 and 1991, 9488 adults aged 20 years and older were interviewed in their home as part of the third National Health...
429 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 2, 1995in The New England Journal of Medicine 79.26
Jack M. Guralnik140
Estimated H-index: 140
(National Institutes of Health),
Luigi Ferruci142
Estimated H-index: 142
(National Institutes of Health)
+ 2 AuthorsRobert B. Wallace112
Estimated H-index: 112
(National Institutes of Health)
Background Functional assessment is an important part of the evaluation of elderly persons. We conducted this study to determine whether objective measures of physical function can predict subsequent disability in older persons. Methods This prospective cohort study included men and women 71 years of age or older who were living in the community, who reported no disability in the activities of daily living, and who reported that they were able to walk one-half mile (0.8 km) and climb stairs with...
2,527 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 1994in The Journals of Gerontology
Jack M. Guralnik140
Estimated H-index: 140
(National Institutes of Health),
Eleanor Marie Simonsick89
Estimated H-index: 89
(National Institutes of Health)
+ 5 AuthorsRobert B. Wallace112
Estimated H-index: 112
(University of Iowa)
Abstract A short battery of physical performance tests was used to assess lower extremity function in more than 5,000 persons age 71 years and older in three communities. Balance, gait, strength, and endurance were evaluated by examining ability to stand with the feet together in the side-by-side, semi-tandem, and tandem positions, time to walk 8 feet, and time to rise from a chair and return to the seated position 5 times. A wide distribution of performance was observed for each test. Each test...
4,069 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1993in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 4.29
Barbara E. Ainsworth80
Estimated H-index: 80
,
William L. Haskell104
Estimated H-index: 104
+ 4 AuthorsRalph S. Paffenbarger72
Estimated H-index: 72
ABSTRACTA coding scheme is presented for classifying physical activity by rate of energy expenditure, i.e., by intensity. Energy cost was established by a review of published and unpublished data. This coding scheme employs five digits that classify activity by purpose (i.e., sports, occupation, sel
182 Citations
Cited By309
Newest
Published on May 1, 2019in European Journal of Applied Physiology 2.40
Matthew J. Lees4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Leeds Beckett University),
Oliver J. Wilson4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Leeds Beckett University)
+ 1 AuthorsTheocharis Ispoglou4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Leeds Beckett University)
Purpose This pilot study investigated differences in lean tissue mass, muscle strength, muscle quality (strength per unit of muscle mass; MQ), and functional performance in healthy younger and older individuals. The most robust predictors of appendicular lean mass (ALM) were then determined in each group.
2 Citations Source Cite
Qu Tian8
Estimated H-index: 8
(National Institutes of Health),
Yusuke Osawa2
Estimated H-index: 2
(National Institutes of Health)
+ 2 AuthorsStephanie A. Studenski72
Estimated H-index: 72
(National Institutes of Health)
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Human Movement Science 1.84
Annalisa Na1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Delaware),
Thomas S. Buchanan45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of Delaware)
Abstract Knee osteoarthritis (OA) gait is characterized by simultaneous flexor and extensor use, or co-contraction. Co-contraction can stabilize and redirect joint forces. However, co-contraction can push and pull on the femur and tibia that exacerbate OA symptoms and make walking difficult. Such movements are quantifiable by limb dynamics (i.e., linear acceleration and jerk); thus, this study examines limb dynamics and its relationship with co-contraction and OA related walking difficulty. Thre...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research 2.12
G. Bernardelli3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Milan),
Carlotta Roncaglione1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico)
+ 3 AuthorsMaura Marcucci24
Estimated H-index: 24
(McMaster University)
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Published on Mar 26, 2019in Frontiers in Physiology 3.39
Ceereena Ubaida-Mohien6
Estimated H-index: 6
(National Institutes of Health),
Marta Gonzalez-Freire11
Estimated H-index: 11
(National Institutes of Health)
+ 5 AuthorsLuigi Ferruci142
Estimated H-index: 142
(National Institutes of Health)
Muscle strength declines with aging and increasing physical activity is the only intervention known to attenuate this decline. In order to adequately investigate both preventive and therapeutic interventions against sarcopenia, a better understanding of the biological changes that are induced by physical activity in skeletal muscle is required. To determine the effect of physical activity on the skeletal muscle proteome, we utilized liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry to obtain quantitative ...
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Published on Feb 1, 2019in Psychology & Health 2.46
Patti C. Parker3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Manitoba),
Judith G. Chipperfield34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Manitoba)
+ 2 AuthorsChristiane A. Hoppmann18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of British Columbia)
AbstractObjectives: Although physical activity is recognised as a health-promoting behaviour for older adults, notable barriers exist that may reduce physical activity in this age group. Limited research has explored causal beliefs (attributions) as a barrier to physical activity. Our study assessed associations between older adults’ attributions about physical activity and objective health outcomes. Methods: We examined the role of attributions as a predictor of everyday physical activity (EPA)...
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Published on Jan 31, 2019
Bertrand Fougère10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Matteo Cesari3
Estimated H-index: 3
Source Cite
Joshua F. Baker22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Pennsylvania),
A. B. Newman140
Estimated H-index: 140
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 6 AuthorsTamara B. Harris170
Estimated H-index: 170
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 10, 2019in Frontiers in Physiology 3.39
Paul M. Coen22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Translational Research Institute),
Robert V. Musci3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Colorado State University)
+ 1 AuthorsBenjamin F. Miller (Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation)
Sarcopenia is the loss of muscle mass, strength and physical function that is characteristic of aging. The progression of sarcopenia is gradual but may be accelerated by periods of muscle loss during physical inactivity secondary to illness or injury. The loss of mobility, independence and increased co-morbidities associated with sarcopenia represent a major healthcare challenge for older adults. Mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired proteostatic mechanisms are important contributors to the com...
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