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“Real” high‐potential careers: An empirical study into the perspectives of organisations and high potentials

Published on Dec 21, 2007in Personnel Review 1.36
· DOI :10.1108/00483480810839987
Nicky Dries22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Vrije Universiteit Brussel),
Roland Pepermans29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
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Abstract
Purpose – The purpose of this empirical study is to make a contribution to career theory in general, and to the literature on high‐potential careers in particular, by examining the careers of real high potentials, taking place in the twenty‐first century world of work, from the perspectives of the high potentials themselves as well as those of their organizations.Design/methodology/approach – A total of 34 interviews were conducted within three study samples: high potentials (n=14), organisational representatives employed by the same organisations that provided the high‐potential participants (n=8), and organisational representatives employed by organisations that did not allow for interviewing of their high potentials (n=12).Findings – The current study suggests that high potentials still have organisational‐traditional careers. High upward mobility, low inter‐organisational mobility and career self‐management emerged as key features of real high‐potential careers.Practical implications – Implications ar...
  • References (40)
  • Citations (85)
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References40
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2007
Charlotte Sabbe1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Marc Timmerman1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Aug 1, 2006in Journal of Vocational Behavior 3.39
Jon P. Briscoe4
Estimated H-index: 4
(NIU: Northern Illinois University),
Douglas T. Hall57
Estimated H-index: 57
(BU: Boston University)
Abstract The boundaryless and protean career concepts are compared in this article. It is suggested that the theories can be more finely delineated to produce more effective theory and research. The boundaryless career concept is profiled according to Sullivan and Arthur’s (this issue) categories of psychological and physical boundarylessness. The protean career concept is discussed based upon the degree of self-directed and values driven career orientations a career actor demonstrates. We join ...
Published on May 1, 2006in Personnel Review 1.36
Joanne Duberley20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Birmingham),
Mary Mallon17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Massey University),
Laurie Cohen25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Lboro: Loughborough University)
Purpose – To apply and develop Stephen Barley's model of career structuration to offer insights into the transition into portfolio working.Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative case study methodology is used. Interviews were conducted with managers who had left the National Health Service to develop portfolio careers.Findings – The adoption of the Barley model of career structuration as a sensitising device has made it possible to show how individuals have drawn from existing scripts embed...
Published on Jan 1, 2005
Anneleen Forrier12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven),
Luc Sels28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven),
Marijke Verbruggen10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Catholic University of Leuven)
We investigate whether the perceived need for employer-independent career counseling differs between individuals according to their career type. We identify six different career types, basically varying in terms of career path and career aspirations: the bounded, boundaryless, staying, homeless, trapped and released career type. We investigate moreover (1) whether career satisfaction mediates the relationship between career types and the perceived need for career counseling and (2) whether this ...
Published on Apr 1, 2004
Nigel King25
Estimated H-index: 25
Published on Apr 1, 2004in Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources 0.89
Sara Walton12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Otago),
Mary Mallon17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Massey University)
This paper outlines the results from an exploratory research project into individual perceptions of career in the changing world of work. The aim was to understand how individuals were making sense of and enacting their career. Three organisations, which had all undergone significant change, were used to identify participants whose stories were generated either through qualitative surveys and interviews. From data analysis using the NUD•ist software program, six themes were generated illustratin...
Published on Jan 1, 2004in Harvard Business Review 5.69
Boris Groysberg24
Estimated H-index: 24
,
Ashish Nanda10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Nitin Nohria42
Estimated H-index: 42
An in-depth study of 1,052 star stock analysts who worked for 78 investment banks in the United States from 1988 to 1996 finds that when a company hires a star, the star’s performance plunges, there is a sharp decline in the functioning of the group or team she works with, and the company’s market value falls. Moreover, stars don’t stay with the organizations for long. For all those reasons, we conclude that companies cannot gain a competitive advantage by hiring stars from outside the business....
Published on Oct 1, 2003in Journal of Management Development
Roland Pepermans29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Vrije Universiteit Brussel),
Daniël Vloeberghs7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Antwerp),
Britt Perkisas1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
This paper describes elements of the policies employed for identifying high potentials in their organizational context. A set of systematic research questions has been used to conceive a structured questionnaire to empirically investigate the kind of high potential competencies that companies expect when identifying high potentials and how this identification takes place. These elements of a high potential policy have been related to a number of organizational variables in 86 Belgian companies. ...
Published on Jan 1, 2003in Journal of Applied Psychology 5.07
Philip M. Podsakoff53
Estimated H-index: 53
(IU: Indiana University Bloomington),
Scott B. MacKenzie47
Estimated H-index: 47
(IU: Indiana University Bloomington)
+ 1 AuthorsNathan P. Podsakoff21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UF: University of Florida)
Interest in the problem of method biases has a long history in the behavioral sciences. Despite this, a comprehensive summary of the potential sources of method biases and how to control for them does not exist. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to examine the extent to which method biases influence behavioral research results, identify potential sources of method biases, discuss the cognitive processes through which method biases influence responses to measures, evaluate the many differ...
Published on Sep 1, 2002in Journal of Organizational Behavior 5.00
Jane Sturges16
Estimated H-index: 16
(OU: Open University),
David Guest41
Estimated H-index: 41
('KCL': King's College London)
+ 1 AuthorsKate Mackenzie Davey11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Birkbeck, University of London)
Summary This paper reports the findings of a two-wave longitudinal study investigating relationships between organizational and individual career management activities and organizational commitment in the early years of graduate careers. Several hypotheses are tested and receive mixed support. High organizational commitment predicts the practice of career management activities by graduates to further their career within the organization while low commitment is closely associated with behaviour a...
Cited By85
Newest
Maria Christina Meyers7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Tilburg University)
Abstract Organizational talent management has been widely recognized as a key driver of firm performance. Existing theoretical and empirical work in the domain has drawn on Social Exchange Theory to suggest that talent management affects organizational performance by eliciting positive reactions such as high organizational commitment and work effort among the firm's most high performing and high potential employees (i.e., talented employees). While this work has produced valuable insights, it ha...
Published on Jul 1, 2019in BRQ Business Research Quarterly 3.25
Paul Sparrow34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Lancaster University)
Abstract Current debates around talent management echo previous concern about the development of the field of IHRM. This paper uses historical analysis to examine two questions: has the field followed a logical progression and process of increasing coherence; and has its narrative been shaped in ideological ways? It identifies six concepts that guided and enabled the subsequent development of the talent management field. It shows how a selection of these ideas were re-packaged through the introd...
Published on Mar 21, 2019in Baltic Journal of Management 1.47
Violetta Khoreva5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Edyta Kostanek1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Coventry University)
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the evolving patterns and challenges of talent management (TM) in the emerging markets of Russia and Kazakhstan from the employer perspective. Increasing the understanding of how TM is recognized from the employer perspective may better equip us to address how to effectively manage and lead the available talents in these and other emerging markets. Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted a qualitative study comprising 50 semi-structur...
Stefan Jooss (UCC: University College Cork), Anthony McDonnell16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UCC: University College Cork)
+ 1 AuthorsVlad Vaiman16
Estimated H-index: 16
(California Lutheran University)
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Human Resource Development Review 2.49
Anoopa Narayanan (CUSAT: Cochin University of Science and Technology), S. Rajithakumar (CUSAT: Cochin University of Science and Technology), Manoj Menon
The differential value created by talented employees and their contribution to organizations in the hypercompetitive and complex global economy has made talent management a strategic priority for organizations. Talent management has been advocated as an important strategy to retain talented employees, but academic studies exploring their relationship are limited. Building on the Resource-Based View (RBV) theory and Social Exchange Theory (SET), the present article studies the relationship betwee...
Maria Christina Meyers7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Tilburg University),
Marianne van Woerkom13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Tilburg University)
+ 1 AuthorsNicky Dries22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
AbstractHR managers have different beliefs about the nature, value, and instrumentality of talent—referred to as ‘talent philosophies’. In line with cognitive psychology, we reason that talent philosophies are similar to mental models that influence how HR managers interpret and use talent management (TM) practices within their organizations. In this article, we explore the prevalence of four different talent philosophies (exclusive/stable; exclusive/developable; inclusive/stable; inclusive/deve...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in European Management Review 1.60
Marian Crowley-Henry5
Estimated H-index: 5
(MU: Maynooth University),
Emily T. Benson (Keene State College), Akram Al Ariss14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Toulouse Business School)
Jennie Sumelius10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Vaasa),
Adam Smale13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Vaasa),
Sachiko Yamao
AbstractGiven the sensitive nature of communicating talent status in an ‘exclusive’ talent management system and the complexity involved in simultaneously sending signals of exclusivity and inclusivity, some organisations avoid open communication and instead opt for ‘strategic ambiguity’ – intentionally maintaining an element of secrecy and information asymmetry. However, we know relatively little about the effects of this communication approach as a feature of the organisational context on the ...