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A Second Anolis Lizard in Dominican Amber and the Systematics and Ecological Morphology of Dominican Amber Anoles

Published on Jan 1, 1998
Kevin de Queiroz38
Estimated H-index: 38
,
Ling-Ru Chu2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Jonathan B. Losos75
Estimated H-index: 75
Abstract
Devices and methods for minimally invasive harvesting of a vessel or vascular conduit, especially the saphenous vein for coronary artery bypass grafting, are disclosed. Generally, an instrument is provided which has one or more specially designed end effectors which are permanently or detachably mounted to a harvesting implement, and may also be interchangeable with each other. The end effectors have features or elements which facilitate separation of connective tissue from the vessel and/or engagement of side branches to be separated from the vessel. In various embodiments, the instrument also provides means for quickly and easily attaching and detaching the end effectors as well as means for engaging with an endoscope, if desired. The harvesting methods provide for use of the instruments through one or more minimally invasive incisions.
  • References (15)
  • Citations (26)
References15
Newest
Published on Sep 27, 1996in Science41.04
Manuel A. Iturralde-Vinent3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
R. D. E. MacPhee3
Estimated H-index: 3
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
The age and depositional history of Dominican amber-bearing deposits have not been well constrained. Resinites of different ages exist in Hispaniola, but all of the main amberiferous deposits in the Dominican Republic (including those famous for yielding biological inclusions) were formed in a single sedimentary basin during the late Early Miocene through early Middle Miocene (15 to 20 million years ago), according to available biostratigraphic and paleogeographic data. There is little evidence ...
Published on Apr 1, 1996in Nature43.07
R. D. E. MacPhee1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
David A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
Published on Jan 1, 1992
George Poinar26
Estimated H-index: 26
Published on Jan 1, 1991
Albert Schwartz9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Robert W. Henderson16
Estimated H-index: 16
This book summarizes all available information on West Indian herpetofauna. Using data from more than 6000 pages of field notes and 1000 literature sources, Schwartz and Henderson present a detailed account of every known reptile and amphibian species existing on the numerous islands of the West Indies. For each (almost 600), they offer a complete synopsis, including description, holotype, source of illustrations, and range map. A section on natural history summarizes what is known about the hab...
Published on Feb 1, 1990in Ecological Monographs7.70
Jonathan B. Losos75
Estimated H-index: 75
Studies of ecomorphology–the relationship among species between morphology and ecology–contain two implicit and rarely tested hypotheses: (1) that morphological differences among species result in differences in performance capability at ecologically relevant tasks, which, in turn, produce differences in behavior and ecology; and (2) that morphology, performance capability, ecology and behavior have evolved synchronously. I tested these hypotheses using the Anolis lizards of Jamaica and Puerto R...
Published on Jan 1, 1990
K Risti L. B Urnell1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
S. B Lair1
Estimated H-index: 1
1 ABSTRACT . - Protein variation in 49 West Indian species of the iguanid lizard genus Anolis was examined by sequential electrophoresis at 12 slow-evolving loci. The use of this technique nearly doubled the total number of alleles detected (121 before, 233 after). Genetic distance and parsimony analyses identified intra-island radiations on Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola, and Puerto Rico, and found little evidence of close inter-island relationships. In most cases, these island radiations (series) d...
Published on Sep 4, 1987in Science41.04
George O. Poinar26
Estimated H-index: 26
(University of California, Berkeley),
David C. Cannatella1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of California, Berkeley)
A frog of the leptodactylid genus Eleutherodactylus is reported from Eocene amber found in the Dominican Republic. It is the first described amphibian fossil in amber, and the oldest complete lissamphibian fossil from Mesoamerica (Central America and Mexico). Dating of the amber matrix indicates that by the end of the Eocene a diverse fauna was present in the Antilles, much earlier than has generally been proposed. The presence of this and other amber fossils from this same age suggests that Ter...
Cited By26
Newest
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution3.99
Cristian Román-Palacios2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales),
Jose Tavera1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales),
María del Rosario Castañeda6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales)
Abstract Whereas most of the studies that discuss the evolutionary divergence of Anolis lizards have dated the clade’s crown group in between 31 and 64 Ma, a single study has recovered a significantly older age for the same node (87 Ma). These differences also entail notable consequences on the preferred biogeographical hypothesis for the whole clade. Here we analyze a total of seven dating strategies by combining three calibration sources in independent BEAST runs to infer the most probable div...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in BMC Evolutionary Biology3.04
Erich P. Hofmann2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Clemson University),
Josiah H. Townsend3
Estimated H-index: 3
(IUP: Indiana University of Pennsylvania)
Recent studies have begun to reveal the complex evolutionary and biogeographic histories of mainland anoles in Central America, but the origins and relationships of many taxa remain poorly understood. One such group is the Anolis (Norops) crassulus species subgroup, which contains ten morphologically similar highland taxa, the majority of which have restricted distributions. The nominal taxon A. crassulus has a disjunct distribution from Chiapas, Mexico, through Guatemala, in the highlands of El...
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Systematic Biology10.27
Steven Poe15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UNM: University of New Mexico),
Adrián Nieto-Montes de Oca16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UNAM: National Autonomous University of Mexico)
+ 8 AuthorsFernando Ayala-Varela4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador)
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution3.99
Ivan Prates8
Estimated H-index: 8
(CCNY: City College of New York),
Paulo Roberto Melo-Sampaio4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UFRJ: Federal University of Rio de Janeiro)
+ 3 AuthorsAna Carolina Carnaval19
Estimated H-index: 19
(CCNY: City College of New York)
Abstract Data on species ranges and phylogenetic relationships are key in historical biogeographical inference. In South America, our understanding of the evolutionary processes that underlie biodiversity patterns varies greatly across regions. Little is known, for instance, about the drivers of high endemism in the southern montane region of the Atlantic Rainforest. In this region, former biogeographic connections with other South American ecosystems have been invoked to explain the phylogeneti...
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Current Biology9.19
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 11 AuthorsAlexander P. Wolfe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Summary In the two decades since the discovery of feathered dinosaurs [1–3], the range of plumage known from non-avialan theropods has expanded significantly, confirming several features predicted by developmentally informed models of feather evolution [4–10]. However, three-dimensional feather morphology and evolutionary patterns remain difficult to interpret, due to compression in sedimentary rocks [9, 11]. Recent discoveries in Cretaceous amber from Canada, France, Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, an...
Emma Sherratt13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UNE: University of New England (Australia)),
María del Rosario Castañeda6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Harvard University)
+ 5 AuthorsJonathan B. Losos75
Estimated H-index: 75
(Harvard University)
Abstract Whether the structure of ecological communities can exhibit stability over macroevolutionary timescales has long been debated. The similarity of independently evolved Anolis lizard communities on environmentally similar Greater Antillean islands supports the notion that community evolution is deterministic. However, a dearth of Caribbean Anolis fossils—only three have been described to date—has precluded direct investigation of the stability of anole communities through time. Here we re...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution3.99
Ivan Prates8
Estimated H-index: 8
(CCNY: City College of New York),
Miguel Trefaut Rodrigues33
Estimated H-index: 33
(USP: University of São Paulo)
+ 1 AuthorsAna Carolina Carnaval19
Estimated H-index: 19
(CCNY: City College of New York)
Abstract The ecology and evolution of Caribbean anoles are well described, yet little is known about mainland anole species. Lack of phylogenetic information limits our knowledge about species boundaries, morphological evolution, and the biogeography of anoles in South America. To help fill this gap, we provide an updated molecular phylogeny of the Dactyloa (Dactyloidae), with emphasis on the punctata species group. By sampling understudied Amazonian taxa, we (i) assess the phylogenetic placemen...
Published on Sep 1, 2014in Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society2.91
María del Rosario Castañeda6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Harvard University),
Emma Sherratt13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Harvard University),
Jonathan B. Losos75
Estimated H-index: 75
(Harvard University)
Anoles are well-known examples of adaptive radiation and convergent evolution. Their phylogenetic relationships have been intensely studied, but their fossil record remains fairly poor, limiting our understanding of their evolutionary history. We present new data on Anolis electrum Lazell, 1965, the first discovered fossil anole and sole vertebrate described from Mexican amber, using X-ray computed tomography. We inferred the phylogenetic relationships of A. electrum and comment on its use in es...
Juan D. Daza14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Villanova University),
Aaron M. Bauer39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Villanova University),
Eric Snively6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UWL: University of Wisconsin–La Crosse)
Gekkota is often interpreted as sister to all remaining squamates, exclusive of dibamids, or as sister to Autarchoglossa. It is the only diverse lineage of primarily nocturnal lizards and includes some of the smallest amniotes. The skeleton of geckos has often been interpreted as paedomorphic and/or “primitive” but these lizards also display a wide range of structural specializations of the postcranium, including modifications associated with both scansorial locomotion and limb reduction. Althou...
Jack L. Conrad14
Estimated H-index: 14
(New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine),
Jason J. Head19
Estimated H-index: 19
(NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln),
Matthew T. Carrano32
Estimated H-index: 32
(National Museum of Natural History)
We describe an unusual squamate fossil from the Green River Formation (Uintan, Eocene) from the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, USA. The new specimen, USNM PAL 540708, is a small fossil squamate skin lacking skeletal elements. It is preserved as a part and counterpart in fine-grained limestone. Recovery of a fossil organism's skin (not a shed, but a true skin) is unusual and is most often accompanied by bone preservation. Phylogenetic analysis of a combined morphology (phenotype) and genetic dat...
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