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The Social Accountability of Medical Schools and its Indicators

Published on Sep 1, 2012in Education and Health
· DOI :10.4103/1357-6283.109785
Charles Boelen2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Shafik Dharamsi14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UBC: University of British Columbia),
Trevor Gibbs12
Estimated H-index: 12
Cite
Abstract
Context : There is growing interest worldwide in social accountability for medical and other health professional schools. Attempts have been made to apply the concept primarily to educational reform initiatives with limited concern towards transforming an entire institution to commit and assess its education , research and service delivery missions to better meet priority health needs in society for an efficient, equitable an sustainable health system. Methods : In this paper, we clarify the concept of social accountability in relation to responsibility and responsiveness by providing practical examples of its application; and we expand on a previously described conceptual model of social accountability (the CPU model), by further delineating the parameters composing the model and providing examples on how to translate them into meaningful indicators. Discussion : The clarification of concepts of social responsibility, responsiveness and accountability and the examples provided in designing indicators may help medical schools and other health professional schools in crafting their own benchmarks to assess progress towards social accountability within the context of their particular environment.
  • References (14)
  • Citations (41)
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References14
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Medical Education 4.62
Bob Woollard3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UBC: University of British Columbia),
Charles Boelen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
Medical Education 2012: 46: 21–27 Context The acquisition of sums of knowledge and mastery of sophisticated technologies by medical graduates is insufficient for their responsibilities to recognise and adapt to people's evolving needs. Response A Global Consensus on Social Accountability for Medical Schools brought together 130 organisations and individuals from around the world with responsibility for health education, professional regulation and policy making to participate for 8 months in a t...
39 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 18, 2011in PLOS Medicine
Francesca Celletti6
Estimated H-index: 6
(WHO: World Health Organization),
Teri A. Reynolds12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
+ 2 AuthorsManuel Dayrit6
Estimated H-index: 6
(WHO: World Health Organization)
1 Department of Human Resources for Health, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2 Department of Human Resources for Health, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, and Department of Emergency Medicine and Division of Global Health, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America, 3 Independent Contributor, London, United Kingdom, 4 Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America
38 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2011in Academic Medicine 5.08
Shafik Dharamsi14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Anita Ho13
Estimated H-index: 13
+ 1 AuthorsRobert Woollard12
Estimated H-index: 12
AbstractThere is a growing demand for educating future physicians to be socially responsible. It is not clear, however, how social responsibility is understood and acted on in medical education and practice, particularly within the context of a growing desire to improve health care through an equita
72 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2011in Medical Teacher 2.71
Charles Boelen5
Estimated H-index: 5
(WHO: World Health Organization),
Robert Woollard12
Estimated H-index: 12
More than ever are we facing the challenge of providing evidence that what we do responds to priority health needs and challenges of the ones we intend to serve: patients, citizens, families, communities and the nation at large. Which are those health needs and challenges? Who defines them? How do medical schools organize themselves to address them through their education, research and service delivery functions? Principles of social accountability call for an explicit three-tier engagement: ide...
53 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2011in Educación Médica
Charles Boelen5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Robert Woollard12
Estimated H-index: 12
49 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2010in The Lancet 59.10
Julio Frenk Mora45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Harvard University),
Lincoln Chen36
Estimated H-index: 36
(China Medical Board)
+ 16 AuthorsPatrick Kelley3
Estimated H-index: 3
100 years ago a series of studies about the education of health professionals led by the 1910 Flexner report sparked groundbreaking reforms. Through integration of modern science into the curricula at university-based schools the reforms equipped health professionals with the knowledge that contributed to the doubling of life span during the 20th century. By the beginning of the 21st century however all is not well. Glaring gaps and inequities in health persist both within and between countries ...
2,139 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2010in The Lancet 59.10
Zulfiqar A Bhutta113
Estimated H-index: 113
(Aga Khan University),
Lincoln Chen36
Estimated H-index: 36
(China Medical Board)
+ 17 AuthorsYang Ke7
Estimated H-index: 7
(PKU: Peking University)
75 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 12, 2010in PLOS Medicine
Julio Frenk Mora45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Harvard University)
The author has declared that no competing interests exist. This work was supported by a grant to the Institutional Innovations in Global Health project by the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States under its “Acting in Time” program. Additional support was received from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Research Triangle, North Carolina, United States. The funders had no role the decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript. Provena...
184 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 20, 2009in Medical Education 4.62
Charles Boelen5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Bob Woollard3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
Context An association with excellence should be reserved for educational institutions which verify that their actions make a difference to people’s well-being. The graduates they produce should not only possess all of the competencies desirable to improve the health of citizens and society, but should also use them in their professional practice. Four principles enunciated by the World Health Organization refer to the type of health care to which people have a right, from both an individual and...
136 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2008in Education and Health
Pálsdóttir B1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Neusy Aj1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NYU: New York University),
Reed G1
Estimated H-index: 1
Introduction: To date, traditional biomedical hospital-centered models of medical education have not produced physicians in quantities or with the competencies and commitment needed to meet health needs in poor communities worldwide. The Global Health Education Consortium conducted an initial assessment of selected medical education programs/schools established specifically to meet these needs. The goals of this assessment are to determine whether there is a need for and interest in collaboratin...
20 Citations
Cited By41
Newest
Aurore Fehlmann2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Milena Abbiati1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Geneva)
+ 1 AuthorsL. Georges Savoldelli
Abstract Objectives Knowing and understanding the reasons why medical students choose postgraduate medical specialities are essential to help influence the workforce for a balanced national healthcare system. The objective of this study was to determine motivating factors for choosing a speciality career in general and, more specifically, for the choice of obstetrics and gynaecology (OBGYN) over surgery or general practice. Study design This study was based on prospectively collected data from a...
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Published on Mar 6, 2019in African Vision and Eye Health
Vanessa R. Moodley2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UKZN: University of KwaZulu-Natal)
Background: New optometry education programmes in sub-Saharan Africa share a responsibility for blindness prevention by virtue of producing the countries first practitioners. Programmes need to be relevant and of a high quality to ensure sustainability. A quality culture is not a single event involving an accreditation audit but an integrated continuous system across core academic areas and accepted by all concerned in the programme. Aim: The aim was to determine the extent to which quality assu...
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Published on Feb 4, 2019in Australian Journal of Rural Health 1.04
Colleen Cheek7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UTAS: University of Tasmania),
Richard Hays23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UTAS: University of Tasmania)
+ 2 AuthorsL Shires3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UTAS: University of Tasmania)
Objective: To identify under-represented groups in a medical school intake. Design: Descriptive analysis of student demographic characteristics. Setting: One state-wide medical school. Participants: All students enrolled between 2010 and 2016. Main outcome measure(s): Proportion of students from regional and rural areas, state versus independent schools, highest parental qualification, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander students. Results: Of 819 students, 472 (57.6%) were from Tasmania, five (...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in BMC Medical Education 1.87
Ron Brooker3
Estimated H-index: 3
(USYD: University of Sydney),
Wendy Hu12
Estimated H-index: 12
(USYD: University of Sydney)
+ 1 AuthorsPenelope A Abbott10
Estimated H-index: 10
(USYD: University of Sydney)
One of the purposes of undergraduate medical education is to assist students to consider their future career paths in medicine, alongside the needs of the societies in which they will serve. Amongst the most medically underserved groups of society are people in prison and those with a history of incarceration. In this study we examined the experiences of medical students undertaking General Practice placements in a prison health service. We used the theoretical framework of the Social Cognitive ...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 3, 2018in Medical Teacher 2.71
Richard Hays23
Estimated H-index: 23
(JCU: James Cook University)
AbstractObjective: To borrow a public health concept, there has been a global outbreak, perhaps a pandemic, of new medical schools during the last 20 years, resulting in a diverse range of programs in many different contexts. The question posed was: how should the task of establishing a new medical program be approached in 2018?Methods: Based on involvement with several new medical programs, this paper presents a highly idealistic commentary on what a new medical program might look like. The pap...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Advances in Health Sciences Education 2.76
William Ventres10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of El Salvador),
Charles Boelen5
Estimated H-index: 5
(WHO: World Health Organization),
Cynthia Haq12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Within health professional education around the world, there exists a growing awareness of the professional duty to be socially responsible, being attentive to the needs of all members of communities, regions, and nations, especially those who disproportionately suffer from the adverse influence of social determinants. However, much work still remains to progress beyond such good intentions. Moving from contemplation to action means embracing social accountability as a key guiding principle for ...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2018in European Journal of Dental Education 1.53
Stéphanie Tubert-Jeannin6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Didier Jourdan23
Estimated H-index: 23
Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Health Care Analysis 1.04
Lynette Reid5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Dal: Dalhousie University)
Scientism in medical education distracts educators from focusing on the content of learning; it focuses attention instead on individual achievement and validity in its measurement. I analyze the specific form that scientism takes in medicine and in medical education. The competencies movement attempts to challenge old “scientistic” views of the role of physicians, but in the end it has invited medical educators to focus on validity in the measurement of individual performance for attitudes and s...
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Margaret Matthews2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UKZN: University of KwaZulu-Natal),
Jacqueline Van Wyk5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UKZN: University of KwaZulu-Natal)
Background: Good communication is integral to social accountability, and training is included in medical curricula internationally. In KwaZulu-Natal, training is conducted in English, in spite of most public sector patients being mother tongue isiZulu speakers. Communication challenges with patients are common, but good communication and African language teaching are not emphasised in teaching. Aim: This study explored communication training and how it related to social accountability at a singl...
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Published on Jan 1, 2018in Medical Education 4.62
Charles Boelen5
Estimated H-index: 5
Context As the purpose of medical education is to produce graduates able to most effectively address people's health concerns, there is general agreement that coordination with the health care system is essential. For too long, coordination has been dealt with in a subjective manner with only few landmarks to ensure objective and measurable achievements. Over the last 30 years, since the Edinburgh Declaration on medical education, progress has been made, namely with the concept of social account...
5 Citations Source Cite