The Place of Solidarity in Public Health Ethics

Published on Jun 1, 2012in Public health reviews
· DOI :10.1007/BF03391656
Angus Dawson16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Birmingham),
Bruce Jennings23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Center for Humans and Nature)
Abstract
When we consider the literature that has been produced exploring approaches to public health ethics, it is rare to find any mention of solidarity. One obvious conclusion is that solidarity is a meaningless or superfluous consideration. We suggest that this is not the right conclusion to draw, and that we must first understand what solidarity is and then consider what difference it might make to thinking about issues in public health ethics. In this paper we, first, outline some of the existing approaches to public health ethics and suggest that they often involve a set of questionable assumptions about the nature of social relations as well as a clear commitment to particular values. A failure of imagination in relation to solidarity is not, however, an argument against taking the concept seriously. Second, we propose a particular account of solidarity, suggest reasons why it is important for thinking about ethical issues in public health, and suggest how it relates to other relevant values. We argue that it is essential to engage with the issue of where we ought to place solidarity within our debates and frameworks for public health ethics.
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References13
Published on Jan 1, 2008
Michael Boylan1
Estimated H-index: 1
Introduction: 'International Public Health: Morality, Politics, Poverty, War, Disease' Part One: Morality and Politics Muireann Quigley and John Harris, 'Personal or Public Health' Kristen Hessler, 'Exploring the Philosophical Foundations of the Human Rights Approach to Public Health Ethics' Deryck Beyleveld and Shaun Pattinson, 'Moral Interests, Privacy, and Medical Research' Wanda Teays, 'Torture and Public Health' Laura Purdy, 'Exporting the Culture of Life' Part Two: Money and Poverty Norman...
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Published on Jan 1, 2011
Angus Dawson16
Estimated H-index: 16
Preface Introduction Angus Dawson Part I. Concepts: 1. Resetting the parameters: public health as the foundation for public health ethics Angus Dawson 2. Health, disease and the goal of public health Bengt Brulde 3. Selective reproduction, eugenics and public health Stephen Wilkinson 4. Risk and precaution Stephen John Part II. Issues: 5. Smoking, health and ethics Richard Ashcroft 6. Infectious disease control Marcel Verweij 7. Population screening Ainsley Newson 8. Vaccination ethics Angus Daw...
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Published on Sep 1, 2011
Madison Powers9
Estimated H-index: 9
(DePaul University),
Ruth R. Faden46
Estimated H-index: 46
(DePaul University)
CHAPTER 1: THE JOB OF JUSTICE 1.1 Which Inequalities Matter Most 1.2 Justice and Well-Being 1.3 Justice, Sufficiency, and Systematic Disadvantage 1.4 Foundations of Public Health 1.5 Medical Care and Insurance Markets 1.6 Setting Priorities 1.7 Justice, Democracy, and Social Values CHAPTER 2 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Essential Dimensions of Well-Being 2.3 A Moderate Essentialism 2.4 Well-Being and Nonideal Theory 2.5 The Main Alternatives 2.6 Capabilities, Functioning, and Well-Being 2.7 Relativism, ...
292 Citations
Published on Feb 20, 2012
John Coggon9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Southampton)
John Coggon argues that the important question for analysts in the fields of public health law and ethics is 'what makes health public?' He offers a conceptual and analytic scrutiny of the salient issues raised by this question, outlines the concepts entailed in, or denoted by, the term 'public health' and argues why and how normative analyses in public health are inquiries in political theory. The arguments expose and explain the political claims inherent in key works in public health ethics. C...
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Published on Oct 1, 2003in Journal of Medical Ethics 1.89
Raanan Gillon17
Estimated H-index: 17
It is hypothesised and argued that “the four principles of medical ethics” can explain and justify, alone or in combination, all the substantive and universalisable claims of medical ethics and probably of ethics more generally. A request is renewed for falsification of this hypothesis showing reason to reject any one of the principles or to require any additional principle(s) that can’t be explained by one or some combination of the four principles. This approach is argued to be compatible with...
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Published on Jan 1, 2001
R. H. J. ter Meulen1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Wilhelmus Antonius Arts1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
R.J.A. Muffels1
Estimated H-index: 1
Preface and Acknowledgments. List of Figures. List of Tables. Solidarity, Health and Social Care in Europe Introduction to the Volume R. ter Meulen, et al. Part I: Solidarity as a Public Value: Empirical Issues. Modernisation, Solidarity and Care in Europe The Sociologist's Tale W. Arts, R. Verburg. Popular Support for Health Care in Europe Review of the Evidence of Cross-National Surveys J. Gevers, et al. Solidarity and Care in Sweden A. Bergmark, et al. Solidarity and Care in the United Kingdo...
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Ross Upshur45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of Toronto)
Objectives: The objective of this paper is to discuss principles relevant to ethical deliberation in public health.
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Published on Jun 1, 2002in Journal of Law Medicine & Ethics 0.99
James F. Childress15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Virginia),
Ruth R. Faden46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Johns Hopkins University)
+ 7 AuthorsPhillip Nieburg18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Public health ethics, like the field of public health it addresses, traditionally has focused more on practice and particular cases than on theory, with the result that some concepts, methods, and boundaries remain largely undefined. This paper attempts to provide a rough conceptual map of the terrain of public health ethics.Public health ethics, like the field of public health it addresses, traditionally has focused more on practice and particular cases than on theory, with the result that some...
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Published on Aug 1, 2009in International Journal of Epidemiology 8.36
Ishani Kar-Purkayastha1
Estimated H-index: 1
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Published on Nov 1, 2008in Public Health Ethics 1.08
Angus Dawson16
Estimated H-index: 16
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Estimated H-index: 16
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Estimated H-index: 3
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Victoria Camps3
Estimated H-index: 3
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Estimated H-index: 9
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Lisa M. Lee13
Estimated H-index: 13
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Christina Zarowsky1
Estimated H-index: 1
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The development of an agreed-upon set of foundational ethical values for the field of public health is ongoing. In this paper we outline key elements of recent convergence on some basic moral precepts that drive public health. We suggest that three elements are particularly useful for anchoring public health practitioners’ reflections on public health ethics: 1) the notions of “common” and “professional” morality, 2) an understanding of the practice and content of modern public health and especi...
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Theodore H. Tulchinsky14
Estimated H-index: 14
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Bruce Jennings23
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Sarah Viehbeck4
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Jutta Lindert14
Estimated H-index: 14
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Christopher Potter3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Cardiff University)
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Angus Dawson16
Estimated H-index: 16
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Miguel Ángel Royo-Bordonada19
Estimated H-index: 19
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Estimated H-index: 1
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Jasper Littmann4
Estimated H-index: 4
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Estimated H-index: 7
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Estimated H-index: 7
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Estimated H-index: 45
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Estimated H-index: 17
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Ronald Bayer31
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