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Human Nature
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#1Emmanuel De Oliveira (University of Lyon)H-Index: 1
#2Emanuelle Reynaud (University of Lyon)H-Index: 7
Last.François Osiurak (Institut Universitaire de France)H-Index: 14
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Cumulative technological culture can be defined as the progressive diversification, complexification, and enhancement of technological traits through generations. An outstanding issue is to specify the cognitive bases of this phenomenon. Based on the literature, we identified four potential cognitive factors: namely, theory-of-mind, technical-reasoning, creativity, and fluid-cognitive skills. The goal of the present study was to test which of these factors—or a combination thereof—best predicted...
#2James YostH-Index: 1
Last.Stephen Beckerman IH-Index: 14
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In response to recent work on the nature of human aggression, and to shed light on the proximate, as opposed to ultimate, causes of tribal warfare, we present a record of events leading to a fatal Waorani raid on a family from another tribe, followed by a detailed first-person observation of the behavior of the raiders as they prepared themselves for war, and upon their return. We contrast this attack with other Waorani aggressions and speculate on evidence regarding their hormonal underpinnings...
#1Anna Ilona Roberts (University of Chester)H-Index: 7
#2Lindsay Murray (University of Chester)H-Index: 4
Last.Sam G. B. Roberts (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 17
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Humans are strongly lateralized for manual gestures at both individual and population levels. In contrast, the laterality bias in primates is less strong, leading some to suggest that lateralization evolved after the Pan and Homo lineages diverged. However, laterality in humans is also context-dependent, suggesting that observed differences in lateralization between primates and humans may be related to external factors such as the complexity of the social environment. Here we address this quest...
#1Martha Lucia Borras-Guevara (St And: University of St Andrews)H-Index: 2
#2Carlota Batres (St And: University of St Andrews)H-Index: 5
Last.David I. Perrett (St And: University of St Andrews)H-Index: 98
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Recent studies reveal that violence significantly contributes to explaining individual’s facial preferences. Women who feel at higher risk of violence prefer less-masculine male faces. Given the importance of violence, we explore its influence on people’s preferences for a different physical trait. Masculinity correlates positively with male strength and weight or body mass index (BMI). In fact, masculinity and BMI tend to load on the same component of trait perception. Therefore we predicted th...
#1Richard J. Chacon (WU: Winthrop University)H-Index: 7
#2Yamilette Chacon (JMU: James Madison University)H-Index: 2
This special issue of Human Nature presents selected works from the 2015 and 2017 “Warfare, Environment, Social Inequality, and Pro-Sociability” (WESIPS) conferences held at the Center for Cross-Cultural Study in Seville, Spain. These investigations explore the manifestations of indigenous warfare and violence from a host of theoretical perspectives. Topics range from the origins of warfare to the psychological repercussions of combat, the relationship between warfare and status, as well as the ...
#1Raymond Hames (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 21
There is a well-entrenched schism on the frequency (how often), intensity (deaths per 100,000/year), and evolutionary significance of warfare among hunter-gatherers compared with large-scale societies. To simplify, Rousseauians argue that warfare among prehistoric and contemporary hunter-gatherers was nearly absent and, if present, was a late cultural invention. In contrast, so-called Hobbesians argue that violence was relatively common but variable among hunter-gatherers. To defend their views,...
#1Azar Gat (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 12
The Seville Statement on Violence rejected the view that violence and war were in any way rooted in human nature and proclaimed that they were merely a cultural artifact. This paper points out both the valid and invalid parts of the statement. It concludes that the potential for both war and peace is embedded in us. The human behavioral toolkit comprises a number of major tools, respectively geared for violent conflict, peaceful competition, or cooperation, depending on people’s assessment of wh...
#1Bilinda Straight (WMU: Western Michigan University)H-Index: 7
#2Belinda L. Needham (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 24
Last.Charles Owuor Olungah (UoN: University of Nairobi)H-Index: 1
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Examining the costs and motivations of warfare is key to conundrums concerning the relevance of this troubling phenomenon to the evolution of social attachment and cooperation, particularly during adolescence and young adulthood—the developmental time period during which many participants are first recruited for warfare. The study focuses on Samburu, a pastoralist society of approximately 200,000 people occupying northern Kenya’s semi-arid and arid lands, asking what role the emotionally sensiti...
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