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#1Andrew J. FlickH-Index: 4
Last. Bret D. ElderdH-Index: 16
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#2Carolin SeeleH-Index: 3
Last. Christian WirthH-Index: 49
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#2David M. ForsythH-Index: 28
Last. Marco Festa-BianchetH-Index: 65
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Last. Renato GregorinH-Index: 15
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#1Jin-Feng Liang (BFU: Beijing Forestry University)H-Index: 1
#2Wei-Ying Yuan (BFU: Beijing Forestry University)
Last. Fei-Hai Yu (BFU: Beijing Forestry University)H-Index: 27
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Soil resource heterogeneity can affect plant growth and competitive ability. However, little is known about how soil resource heterogeneity affects competitive interactions between invasive and native plants. We conducted an experiment with an invasive clonal plant Alternanthera philoxeroides and a coexisting native one Alternanthera sessilis. The experiment was a randomized design with three factors, i.e. two species (A. philoxeroides and A. sessilis), two interspecific competition treatments (...
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#1Corina Maurer (University of Bern)
#2Laura Bosco (University of Bern)H-Index: 1
Last. Alain Jacot (University of Bern)H-Index: 15
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Agricultural intensification, with its associated habitat loss and fragmentation, is among the most important drivers of the ongoing pollination crisis. In this quasi-experimental study, conducted in intensively managed vineyards in southwestern Switzerland, we tested the separate and interdependent effects of habitat amount and fragmentation on the foraging activity and reproductive performance of bumblebee Bombus t. terrestris colonies. Based on a factorial design, we selected a series of spat...
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#1Gerald R. Woodworth (UVA: University of Virginia)
#2Jennifer N. Ward (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 1
Last. David E. Carr (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 21
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Approximately 90% of all annual net primary productivity in temperate deciduous forests ends up entering the detritus food web as leaf litter. Due to chemical and physical differences from native litter, inputs from invasive species may impact the litter-dwelling community and ecosystem processes. We compared leaf-litter nutritional quality and decomposition rates from two invasive shrubs, Lonicera maackii and Rhamnus davurica, and the invasive tree Ailanthus altissima to litter from native oak-...
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