Journal of Business Venturing
IF
6.00
Papers
1226
Papers 1227
1 page of 123 pages (1,227 results)
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Journal of Business Venturing 6.00
Joris Knoben13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Rene Bakker9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Indiana University Bloomington)
Abstract Start-ups have a high need for resources yet face significant risks when forming partnerships with incumbents to access those resources. We propose that a partnership strategy based on relational pluralism, forming multiplex and multifaceted ties with partners, can mitigate these risks. Such ties offer the start-up increased legitimacy and a relational safeguard against resource misappropriation by more powerful partners. However, we propose that there is a limit to the effectiveness of...
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of Business Venturing 6.00
Jeffery S. McMullen23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Indiana University Bloomington)
Abstract In this editorial, I seek to inform administrators and members of promotion and tenure committees about significant developments in the field of entrepreneurship. Using both objective and subjective data, I present a case for why entrepreneurship journals should be considered on par with other, premier management journals, which are widely considered to be unequivocal “A” journals used to assess scholarly contribution and productivity. I entertain and address common objections to equal ...
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Published on Feb 1, 2019in Journal of Business Venturing 6.00
Bruce Hearn (University of Southampton), Igor Filatotchev46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Vienna University of Economics and Business)
Abstract We integrate the institutional perspective with research on the governance role of private equity firms in an investigation of Founder-CEO successions in Initial Public Offerings (IPOs) in emerging markets. Using a unique, hand-collected and comprehensive sample of 191 firms having undertaken IPOs in 21 markets across the African continent between January 2000 and August 2016, we apply instrumental variable (IV) Probit methodology and find that higher levels of private equity ownership ...
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Published on Feb 1, 2019in Journal of Business Venturing 6.00
Brian S. Anderson5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Karl Wennberg21
Estimated H-index: 21
,
Jeffery S. McMullen23
Estimated H-index: 23
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Journal of Business Venturing 6.00
Christopher J. Boudreaux6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Florida Atlantic University),
Boris Nikolaev8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Baylor University),
Peter G. Klein24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Baylor University)
Abstract We examine how country-level institutional context moderates the relationship between three socio-cognitive traits—entrepreneurial self-efficacy, alertness to new business opportunities, and fear of failure—and opportunity entrepreneurship. To do this, we blend social cognitive theory (SCT) with institutional theory to develop a multi-level model of entrepreneurial entry. We merge data from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) surveys and the Economic Freedom of the World (EFW) ind...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of Business Venturing 6.00
Peter Younkin3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Venkat Kuppuswamy3
Estimated H-index: 3
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Journal of Business Venturing 6.00
Daniela Nuscheler (Technical University of Dortmund), Andreas Engelen20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Technical University of Dortmund),
Shaker A. Zahra83
Estimated H-index: 83
(University of Minnesota)
Abstract The literature highlights the importance of top management teams (TMTs) for technology-based new ventures' success in achieving growth, which is often achieved through product introductions. The human capital theory suggests that TMT members' skills, which are typically derived from their education and experience, can facilitate the transformation of new product introductions into growth. We also propose that multiple products that must be managed and brought to the marketplace smoothly...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Journal of Business Venturing 6.00
Christopher Sutter6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Miami University),
Garry D. Bruton49
Estimated H-index: 49
(Texas Christian University),
Juanyi Chen3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Jilin University)
Entrepreneurship is widely argued to be critical for alleviating extreme poverty. However, research on this topic is characterized by diverging perspectives regarding poverty alleviation and remains fragmented across various research domains. This review examines 77 leading academic journals over the period 1990 to 2017 and identifies over 200 articles on entrepreneurship and poverty alleviation. The analysis of these articles highlights three different underlying perspectives: poverty alleviati...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Journal of Business Venturing 6.00
Charles Y. Murnieks6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Oregon State University),
Jonathan D. Arthurs12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Oregon State University)
+ 3 AuthorsJ. Michael Haynie19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Syracuse University)
Abstract Exhaustion is a prominent problem in entrepreneurship because it inhibits cognitive functioning, opportunity identification and evaluation, decision-making, and perseverance. We examine the possible benefits of sleep and mindfulness exercises in reducing the exhaustion experienced by entrepreneurs in the course of launching and growing ventures. Across two studies, we find that both sleep and mindfulness exercises provide avenues for entrepreneurs to combat exhaustion. More interestingl...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Journal of Business Venturing 6.00
Yiran Liu (Tianjin University), Yong Li (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)+ 1 AuthorsYuli Zhang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Nankai University)
Abstract Failure of a prior business provides an opportunity for an entrepreneur to learn in the subsequent entrepreneurial endeavor, but learning from failure is not guaranteed. Why do some entrepreneurs learn less from failure than others? In this study, we propose that a narcissistic personality can create cognitive and motivational obstacles to learning. We further posit that the inhibiting effect of narcissism will be more salient when the costs of failure, especially social costs, are high...
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