International Journal of Law and Psychiatry
IF
1.28
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1860
Papers 1856
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Published on May 1, 2019in International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 1.28
Matthew Burch4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Katherine Furman
The ideal of objectivity is in crisis in science and the law, and yet it continues to do important work in both practices. This article describes that crisis and develops a shared rescue strategy for objectivity in both domains. In a recent article, Inkeri Koskinen (2018) attempts to bring unity to the fragmented discourse on objectivity in the philosophy of science with a risk account of objectivity. To put it simply, she argues that we call practitioners, processes, and products of science obj...
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Abstract Threat assessment has been used in educational settings to assess and manage the risk of targeted violence for nearly two decades, and mental health professionals commonly serve on threat assessment teams. Despite how prevalent threat assessment has become, the extant literature on the psychological factors relevant to the assessment of targeted violence has infrequently distinguished between the types of institutions in which this form of intervention is employed. Furthermore, the uniq...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 1.28
Matt DeLisi45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Iowa State University),
Alan J. Drury9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Michael Elbert3
Estimated H-index: 3
Abstract In community and correctional settings, gang status is a robust predictor of offending, unfortunately relatively few studies have considered behavioral disorders of offenders and whether these disorders mediate the gang-offending relationship. Drawing on a near population of correctional clients on federal supervised release, negative binomial regression and ROC-AUC models found that gang variables were rendered insignificant or were generally weak classifiers of severe offending once b...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 1.28
Leon McRae2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Keele University)
Abstract The governance of sleep sex (or sexsomnia) in the criminal law is a nightmare. Press reports of sleeping, often drunk, men acquitted as automatons of raping adults and children suggest cases are rising. The use of automatism, rather than insanity, in these cases is strong evidence of the immemorial struggle faced by legal psychiatry in appropriately construing unconscious defendants. This paper responds by drawing on well-established psychoanalytic conceptions of unconsciousness to pres...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 1.28
Jorun Rugkåsa2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Sewanee: The University of the South),
Olav Nyttingnes1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Akershus University Hospital)
+ 7 AuthorsGeorg Høyer13
Estimated H-index: 13
Abstract Purpose Despite one of the longest histories of using Outpatient Commitment (OC), little is known about the use in the Norwegian context. Reporting from the Norwegian Outpatient Commitment Study, this article aims to: establish the profile of the OC population in Norway; ascertain the legal justification for the use of OC and what OC involves for patients; investigate possible associations between selected patient and service characteristics and duration of OC, and; explore potential di...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 1.28
Melissa Bardell-Williams2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Melbourne),
Scott Eaton2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Melbourne)
+ 6 AuthorsBrian O'Donoghue10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Melbourne)
Abstract Background Community treatment orders (CTOs) are a controversial form of involuntary treatment for individuals affected by mental health disorders and yet little is known about the use of CTOs in first presentations. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the rates, determinants and outcomes associated with the use of CTOs in young people with a first episode of psychosis (FEP). Methods This epidemiological cohort study included all individuals aged 15–24 who presented with a FEP to t...
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Published on May 1, 2019in International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 1.28
Neil Krishan Aggarwal1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Columbia University Medical Center)
Abstract Even though the Bush Administration opened the Guantanamo Bay detention facility in 2002 in response to the September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States, little remains known about how forensic mental health evaluations relate to the process of detainees who are charged before military commissions. This article discusses the laws governing Guantanamo's military commissions system and mental health evaluations. Notably, the US government initially treated detainees as “unlawful enemy ...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 1.28
Jillian Craigie7
Estimated H-index: 7
(King's College London),
Michael Bach (Ryerson University)+ 4 AuthorsGraham Morgan
Abstract Against a backdrop of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities having been in place for over a decade, discussions about legal capacity, the relevance of mental capacity and the shift to supported decision-making, continue to develop. A panel event was held at the King's Transnational Law Summit in 2018 with the aim of understanding the contours of the dialogue around these issues. This paper presents the contributions of the panel members, a summary of the discussio...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 1.28
Stefano Ferracuti17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Sapienza University of Rome),
Daniela Pucci8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 4 AuthorsAntonio Del Casale16
Estimated H-index: 16
Abstract In Italy, following the closure of psychiatric hospitals in 1978 and the release of psychiatric patients into community care, there was a mismatch between common psychiatric patients and the convicted mentally ill who were sentenced to serve in state forensic psychiatric hospitals. The recent closure of such structures following the Prime Minister's Decree of April 1, 2008, fostered the need to create new structures. These are called “REMS,” and they are based in the community and led b...
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