Contemporary social science
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Published on Feb 14, 2019in Contemporary social science
David Bailey15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Aston University),
Nigel Driffield31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of Warwick),
Erika Kispeter1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Warwick)
Inward investment in the UK is likely to be negatively impacted in a number of ways in the event of a ‘hard Brexit’ via tariff barriers, but even “softer” forms of Brexit such as the current potential agreement are likely to cause customs delays, limits to the ability of firms to relocate staff, and to coordinate “servitization” activities. In addition are the the negative impacts of currency depreciation. In the context of already existing job market polarisation, inward investment flows in adv...
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Published on Mar 14, 2019in Contemporary social science
Fran Bennett7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Oxford),
Julia Brannen22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Institute of Education),
Linda Hantrais13
Estimated H-index: 13
(London School of Economics and Political Science)
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Published on Jan 25, 2019in Contemporary social science
Martin Innes15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Cardiff University),
Diyana Dobreva (Cardiff University), Helen Innes1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Cardiff University)
ABSTRACTThis article explores how digital communications platforms are used in the aftermath of terrorist attacks to amplify or constrain the wider social impacts and consequences of politically motivated violence. Informed by empirical data collected by monitoring social media platforms following four terrorist attacks in the UK in 2017, the analysis focusses on the role of ‘soft facts’ (rumours/conspiracy theories/fake news/propaganda) in influencing public understandings and definitions of th...
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Published on Feb 1, 2019in Contemporary social science
Linda Hantrais13
Estimated H-index: 13
(London School of Economics and Political Science),
Kitty Stewart10
Estimated H-index: 10
(London School of Economics and Political Science),
Kerris Cooper3
Estimated H-index: 3
(London School of Economics and Political Science)
When Denmark, the Republic of Ireland and the UK joined the European Communities in 1973, their governments were required to transpose into domestic law all the treaty commitments previously negotiated by the six founding member states. A chapter on social policy in the 1957 Treaty, conceptualised as a necessary component of economic integration, was designed to prevent distortion of the rules of competition and ensure a high standard of social protection for workers. Although successive UK gove...
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Published on Jan 2, 2019in Contemporary social science
Daniel C. Hallin19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of California, San Diego)
ABSTRACTThis article examines the historical conditions for the electoral victory of Donald Trump and contemporary populist movements more generally, focusing on neoliberalism and populism. Populism is understood here according to the discourseanalytic perspective of Ernesto Laclau. After discussing the way in which neoliberalism undermined the legitimacy of political systems based on the “politics of difference,” the article goes on to elaborate an argument that although populist movements like...
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Published on Jan 3, 2019in Contemporary social science
Mark Williams6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Queen's University Belfast),
Michelle Butler4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Queen's University Belfast)
+ 1 AuthorsSakir Sezer18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Queen's University Belfast)
ABSTRACTThe digital revolution has transformed the potential reach and impact of criminal behaviour. Not only has it changed how people commit crimes but it has also created opportunities for new types of crimes to occur. Policymakers and criminal justice institutions have struggled to keep pace with technological innovation and its impact on criminality. Criminal law and justice, as well as investigative and prosecution procedures, are often outdated and ill-suited to this type of criminality a...
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Published on Jan 2, 2019in Contemporary social science
Martina Lawless13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Economic and Social Research Institute),
Edgar Morgenroth1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Dublin City University)
The UK exit from the European Union (Brexit) is likely to have a range of impacts, with trade flows likely to be most affected. One possible outcome of Brexit is a situation where WTO tariffs apply to merchandise trade between the UK and the EU. By examining detailed trade flows between the UK and all other EU members, matching over 5200 products to the WTO tariff applicable to external EU trade this paper shows that such an outcome would result in significantly different impacts across countrie...
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Published on Jan 2, 2018in Contemporary social science
Ed Brown11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Loughborough University),
Ben Campbell4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Durham University)
+ 3 AuthorsAlistair Wray1
Estimated H-index: 1
ABSTRACTFew areas of international development research have seen as much transformation over recent years as those relating to energy access and low carbon transitions. New policy initiatives, technological innovations and business models have radically transformed the configuration and dynamics of the sector, driven by the urgency of ongoing climate change. This article asks how, given these rapidly moving contexts, policymakers can engage with research at different scales to gather evidence n...
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Published on Apr 3, 2018in Contemporary social science
Mary B. Daly71
Estimated H-index: 71
(University of Oxford)
ABSTRACTThis article examines how the relationship between generational processes and social policy has been studied. It identifies three main approaches: social policy’s targeting of different age groups, social policy’s role in shaping the life course and the generational contract that leads social policy to recognise the claims of particular generations. Each of these perspectives has strengths and weaknesses but, if the goal is to understand how the welfare state embodies generational assump...
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Published on Apr 3, 2018in Contemporary social science
David A. Coall10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Sonja Hilbrand3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Max Planck Society)
+ 1 AuthorsRalph Hertwig41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Max Planck Society)
ABSTRACTWhy do grandparents invest so heavily in their grandchildren and what impact does this investment have on families? A multitude of factors influence the roles grandparents play in their families. Here, we present an interdisciplinary perspective of grandparenting incorporating theory and research from evolutionary biology, sociology and economics. Discriminative grandparental solicitude, biological relatedness and the impact of resource availability are three phenomena used to illustrate...
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