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Developments in Palaeontology and Stratigraphy
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Publisher Summary Many of the Cretaceous lituolid species have quite limited stratigraphic ranges and are valuable as index fossils. They were joined by a new group that made its first appearance in the late Early Cretaceous, the alveolinids. These were miliolines that showed spectacular expansion in the Middle Cretaceous, proliferating in mid-latitudes, and often becoming annular or discoid and subdivided by partitions. Many of them resembled the planispiral-fusiform fusulinines of the Permian,...
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Publisher Summary The first foraminifera fossils with a hard shell to appear in the fossil record are the unilocular, simple agglutinated Allogromiina. The lagenine foraminifera (with walls made of orientated calcite crystals) evolved in the Silurian, but did not show significant evolutionary diversity until the Moscovian–Kasimovian interval in the Carboniferous. chapter discusses the only truly large Palaeozoic foraminifera, the suborder Fusulinina. Members of this suborder evolved from the All...
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Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the main superfamilies and families of the three Neogene suborders—namely, the Miliolina, Rotaliina, and Textulariina. During the Neogene different assemblages dominated different dispositional environments. The most important superfamilies that dominated Tethyan facies are the Nummulitoidea and the Soritoidea, with the latter dominating the assemblages from Late Miocene to present day. However, in order to fully understand the Neogene, all three of the m...
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