Historical Biology
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Published on Jan 16, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
Gary L. Stringer2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Louisiana at Monroe),
Kevin Shannon
ABSTRACTBulk sampling of Pliocene (2.5–3.1 Ma, Piacenzian) beds at the Elizabethtown locality (Bladen County, North Carolina) produced 745 teleostean otoliths (17 taxa, representing extant fish off the U.S. Atlantic coast). Sciaenids dominate the assemblage (8 taxa; 44.4% of the total) and account for an extremely large percentage of total specimens (93.2%). The number of species (richness) at Elizabethtown is relatively small, and percentage abundance indicates a very large unevenness with Micr...
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Published on Feb 20, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
Robin I. Knight2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Natural History Museum),
Noel J. Morris4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Natural History Museum)
ABSTRACTThe majority of species of the Arcoidea identified from the British Lower Jurassic are taxa within the Grammatodontinae. Although this study has further partitioned the Grammatodontinae fossils into the genera Grammatodon, Cosmetodon and Catella based on distinct defining characters, it is clear that differentiation at a species level becomes problematic as adults exhibit characters that grade between two distinct end states. Additionally, there is variability in characters between the j...
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Published on Mar 16, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
Paolo Citton7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Roberto Carluccio5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 1 AuthorsUmberto Nicosia12
Estimated H-index: 12
AbstractIn this paper, a revision of tracks referred to as Chelichnus tazelwurmi is reported. The performed analysis, consisting of a holistic approach by means of a mainly morphological analysis, and a secondarily functional one, led to the proposal of a new ichnogenus, named as Contiichnus tazelwurmi. The three dimensional morphology of the tracks allows for the inference of a complex cycle of locomotion by the trackmakers. The tracks were formed in the main phases (i.e. touch-down, weight-bea...
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Published on Jan 8, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
Maite Arilla3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Anna Rufà5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Bordeaux)
+ 1 AuthorsRuth Blasco26
Estimated H-index: 26
ABSTRACTThe interaction between hominins and carnivores can lead to archaeological scenarios where these relationships materialise in palimpsests. The alternate use of caves and shelters results in overlapped occupations where the action of both predators becomes difficult to trace. Their presence in archaeological sites like cave/shelter-environments have been sufficiently contrasted, but despite this, few neo-taphonomic studies of small carnivore burrows have been developed, and mostly in open...
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Published on Mar 16, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
Mariana B. J. Picasso7
Estimated H-index: 7
(National University of La Plata),
Ricardo S. De Mendoza2
Estimated H-index: 2
(National University of La Plata),
Javier N. Gelfo14
Estimated H-index: 14
(National University of La Plata)
AbstractThe fossil record of the Charadriiformes in South America is scarce and limited to the Neogene of Argentina and Peru. In the present contribution, we present and describe a nearly complete tarsometatarsus of Thinocorus rumicivorus (Least Seedsnipe) from the Ensenadan Age/Stage (early-middle Pleistocene) of Punta Hermengo, Buenos Aires province, Argentina, which constitutes the youngest record for the species to date. We also compare the material with extant and fossil Thinocoridae. The s...
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Published on Mar 8, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
Qian-Nan Zhang (Chinese Academy of Sciences), James L. King (University of Bristol)+ 2 AuthorsHai-Lu You17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
ABSTRACTFossils of Auroraceratops are abundant and found in high concentrations within the Mazongshan area of northwestern China. As small basal Neoceratopsia discovered from the Lower Cretaceous, its general anatomy is well known; however, the endocranial morphology of this genus has never been formally described before. Here, we selected a well-preserved skull which belongs to Auroraceratops sp. and used a high-resolution CT scan to reconstruct its three-dimensional, virtual endocast in order ...
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Published on Apr 21, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
Kristof Veitschegger4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Zurich),
Christian Kolb7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Zurich)
+ 1 AuthorsMarcelo R. Sánchez-Villagra31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of Zurich)
AbstractLongevity and other life history variables are key to understanding evolutionary processes and the biology of extinct animals. For the past 20 years, the lifespan of cave bears received an increased interest. Studies focusing on incremental lines of tooth cementum resulted in detailed mortality patterns from different localities. In this review, we summarise literature on age estimation as well as mortality of different European cave bear localities and present novel data on longevity fr...
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Published on Mar 16, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Junqiang Zhang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Linyi University)
+ 6 AuthorsXiaoli Wang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Linyi University)
The Qingquan dinosaur tracksite, from the Lower Cretaceous Dasheng Group, Shandong Province, China adds to the growing record of saurischian-dominated ichnofaunas of the region. The site reveals the presence of avian theropods (Koreanaornis) and non-avian theropods tentatively referred to Jialingpus. Sauropod tracks are referred to Brontopodus. One site shows evidence of extensive trampling attributable to sauropods and theropods that moved in the same westerly direction, though not necessarily ...
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Published on Feb 4, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
Yifan Hua (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Xuelian Wang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Lanzhou University)
+ 2 AuthorsBainian Sun14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
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Published on Apr 21, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
Borja Figueirido16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Málaga),
Anneke H. van Heteren6
Estimated H-index: 6
ABSTRACTIn this issue, we cover an exceptional topic in Vertebrate Paleobiology that has been an enjoyable challenge for scientists and the popular media alike: the life and death of the Pleistocene cave bear (Ursus spelaeus). As an icon of the ice-age, the cave bear inhabited the glacial ecosystems of Eurasia, and it was the inspiration of a popular book written in 1976 by Bjorn Kurten, entitled The cave bear story: life and death of a vanished animal. Although ‘The life and death’ was a summar...
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