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Journal of English for Academic Purposes
IF
1.73
Papers
666
Papers 705
1 page of 71 pages (705 results)
Newest
#1Hang Su (Sichuan International Studies University)
#2Lei Zhang (AUFE: Anhui University of Finance and Economics)
Abstract Local grammar is an approach to linguistic analysis and explanation which seeks to account for one function or discourse act only. This study employs the local grammar approach to explore discourse acts that are frequently performed in academic writing and further discusses the pedagogical implications and applications of local grammars in EAP teaching, aiming to present an alternative approach to exploring and teaching academic writing. The study first demonstrates the applicability of...
#1Daniel Riccardi (UBC: University of British Columbia)
#2Jennifer Lightfoot (UBC: University of British Columbia)
Last.Simon Lolliot (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 9
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Abstract Academic writing across disciplines is often linguistically complex, characterized by abstract ideas densely packed into nominal groups (Biber & Gray, 2010; Halliday & Martin, 1993; McCabe & Gallagher, 2008), along with infrequent lexis and content requiring specific cultural knowledge. This linguistic complexity presents a significant comprehension challenge, contributing to an increase in the performance gap between English as an additional language (EAL) students and their non-EAL pe...
Abstract This study complements previous research on linguistic features of English as a lingua franca (ELF) from a syntactic complexity perspective. Specifically, the present study seeks to find out how ELF users express meaning relations in research articles using different syntactic structures. The same syntactic phenomena are also analyzed in comparable texts written in American English (AmE) to see in which way ELF writing is shaping research writing in English. Our findings show that the v...
Abstract In recent decades, the traditional perception of academic writing as an objective and impersonal endeavour solely devoted to conveying factual information has given way to a view that sees it as an interactional enterprise laden with personal preferences and cultural influences. With this shift in the understanding of the nature of academic writing, authorial voice and stance have become a major focus for research in applied linguistics. This paper investigates the extent to which Turki...
#1Robert PooleH-Index: 2
#2Andrew Gnann (University of Massachusetts Boston)
Last.Gus Hahn-Powell (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 3
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Abstract This study investigates the use of epistemic stance features within a specialized, diachronic corpus of biochemical research pertaining to the motility of bacterial cells in a process referred to as chemotaxis. The corpus constructed for the investigation includes 328 open access research articles citing the seminal 1972 publication, "Chemotaxis in Escherichia coli analyzed by three-dimensional tracking" in the peer-reviewed journal Nature by Drs. Howard Berg and Douglas Brown. For the ...
#1Jing Hao (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 2
#2Sally Humphrey (ACU: Australian Catholic University)H-Index: 9
Abstract The paper examines the challenges faced by senior Biology students in reading ‘nominalizations’ in textbook materials and illustrates how the challenges can be addressed through pedagogical activities. The study draws on emerging descriptions of field and discourse semantics in Systemic Functional Linguistics that are inspired by Halliday's distinction between ‘live’ and ‘dead’ grammatical metaphors. It first presents a metalanguage to discriminate functions of nominalization. Two diffe...
Abstract Paraphrasing research has often been situated as an issue of academic honesty, ownership of knowledge and discourse appropriation (Abasi, Akvari & Graves, 2006; Currie, 1998; Lyon, 2009; Pecorari, 2003; Pecorari & Shaw, 2012). This paper has a pedagogical focus, outlining how the discrete grammatical processes typical of successful paraphrasing (Keck, 2010) are used to support first year university writing students working in English as an additional language. Drawing on Halliday’s (200...
#1John Lee (CityU: City University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 14
#2Lok Ming Eric Cheung (CityU: City University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 1
Last.Jonathan J. Webster (CityU: City University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 15
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Abstract Proficiency in English academic writing is critical to students’ success at university. With recent advances in language technology, a computer-assisted language learning approach can potentially provide students with additional practice and feedback. We describe our effort in building a tool that promotes greater awareness of how students can expand their registerial repertoire by employing grammatical metaphor, in particular through feedback on the lexico-grammatical options in the no...
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