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Harvard Educational Review
IF
2.63
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1332
Papers 1314
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Harvard Educational Review 2.63
Jennifer S. Light (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
In this essay, Jennifer Light examines the ideal versus the reality of the “unproductive student,” the young person who puts off work in favor of schooling to develop their human capital for later workforce participation. The economic status of student activities has been the source of recent controversy with college athletes and graduate teaching assistants seeking greater recognition for the value they generate in terms of revenues and cost savings, while educational institutions push back aga...
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Harvard Educational Review 2.63
Haeny S. Yoon2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Columbia University),
Tran Nguyen Templeton1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of North Texas)
In this research article, Haeny Yoon and Tran Nguyen Templeton explore the challenges of listening to children in both classrooms and research that purports to center young children. Through two stories from their respective studies, Yoon and Templeton highlight the complexities of following children's leads given the competing agendas situating the work of teachers and researchers in neoliberal contexts. Time constraints, curricular mandates, and research expectations limit children's valuable ...
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Harvard Educational Review 2.63
Rebecca M. Taylor2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Emory University),
Ashley Floyd Kuntz1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Alabama at Birmingham)
In this essay, Rebecca M. Taylor and Ashley Floyd Kuntz explore the higher education aims of advancing truth, respecting speech, and fostering inclusive learning environments in the context of controversial invited speakers on college campuses. They consider the case of Charles Murray's visit to Middlebury College in 2017. They argue that intellectual fairness—which centers the importance of pursuing truth, combating bias, and supporting the intellectual development of members of the academic co...
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Harvard Educational Review 2.63
Suneal Kolluri1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Southern California)
Rigorous learning opportunities at high schools in low-income neighborhoods are limited and ineffective, and in these settings the Advanced Placement (AP) program has mostly eluded successful implementation. In this study, Suneal Kolluri analyzes two schools in the same low-income, Latinx neighborhood that, despite comparable numerical gains, have adopted very different approaches to AP. One school emphasizes competition and dominant cultural norms, while the other stresses collectivism and comm...
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Harvard Educational Review 2.63
Nicole M. Joseph2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Vanderbilt University),
Meseret Hailu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Ohio State University),
Jamaal S. Matthews4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Montclair State University)
In this article, Nicole Joseph, Meseret Hailu, and Jamaal Matthews argue that Black girls' oppression in the United States is largely related to the dehumanization of their personhood, which extends to various institutions, including secondary schools and, especially, mathematics classrooms. They contend that one way to engage in educational equity and social-justice-focused education is to teach Black girls in the classroom in a way that is humanizing. With this idea in mind, they explore relat...
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Harvard Educational Review 2.63
Stephanie Potochnick4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Missouri),
Sarah F. May1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Arizona),
Lisa Y. Flores25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Missouri)
Research on state-level immigration policies and health in the United States is limited. In this article Stephanie Potochnick, Sarah May, and Lisa Flores address the gap in research on state-level immigration policies and health in the US by examining the health implications of in-state resident tuition (IRT) policies and their effects. As one of the largest inclusive state efforts, IRT policies reduce educational barriers for Latina/o undocumented immigrant youth, alleviate familial resource co...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Harvard Educational Review 2.63
S. Garnett Russell1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Columbia University)
While there has been a rise in human rights education at the global level, little attention has been paid to how it is integrated into schools in the United States. Drawing on qualitative and quantitative data collected in two diverse high schools across an academic year, S. Garnett Russell investigates the extent to which human rights education influences students' knowledge and attitudes about human rights and how students engage with and translate global human rights into the local context. A...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Harvard Educational Review 2.63
Ross J. Benbow (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Matthew T. Hora9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Wisconsin-Madison)
In this research article, Ross J. Benbow and Matthew T. Hora explore the employability narrative, a view that focuses on whether colleges and universities provide students with the skills they need to be productively employed after graduation. Using sociocultural theory to problematize this narrative and qualitative methods to fore-ground the experiences of postsecondary educators and employers, the authors investigate conceptions of essential workplace skills in biotechnology and manufacturing ...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Harvard Educational Review 2.63
Dan Battey9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Rutgers University),
Luis Leyva3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Vanderbilt University)
+ 3 AuthorsRoshni Shah1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Rutgers University)
While research has consistently shown the positive effects of having a teacher of the same race on various student outcomes, the literature has not examined how racial match affects the everyday interactions within classrooms. This research article by Dan Battey, Luis A. Leyva, Immanuel Williams, Victoria A. Belizario, Rachel Greco, and Roshni Shah addresses this underexplored area by documenting relational interactions in classrooms to find one mechanism that could be producing racialized effec...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Harvard Educational Review 2.63
Gretchen Brion-Meisels3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Harvard University),
Zanny Alter
Youth participatory action research (YPAR) is a form of critical participatory action research that provides young people with opportunities to identify injustices in their current social realities, to gather and analyze data about these phenomena, and to determine actions that will begin to rectify their negative outcomes. A growing body of evidence suggests that YPAR projects improve outcomes for individual youth as well as the organizations/settings they act on. Despite this, the extent to wh...
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