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Shannon J. Brines
University of Michigan
RecreationBuilt environmentLand useMedicineEnvironmental health
28Publications
15H-index
1,512Citations
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Publications 31
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To date, the research that examines food accessibility has tended to ignore ethnic food outlets. This void leaves us with a limited understanding of how such food stores may, or may not, impact food security. The study discussed herein addressed this by conducting a geospatial assessment of ethnic food outlet accessibility in two U.S. cities: Flint and Grand Rapids, Michigan. We used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools to create a revealed accessibility index for each food outlet, and use...
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#1Jason E. Goldstick (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 13
#2Patrick M. Carter (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 13
Last. Jean T. Shope (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 45
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury, and teen drivers contribute disproportionately to that burden. Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) programs are effective at reducing teen crash risk, but teen crash rates remain high. Between-state variation in the teen crash rate reduction following GDL implementation has been documented, but this is the first study to examine small-area variation in such a reduction. Fusing together crash data from the Michigan State Police, census da...
1 CitationsSource
#1Michelle L. Macy (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 20
#2Shannon J. Brines (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 15
Last. Kathleen D. Klinich (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 16
view all 6 authors...
AbstractObjective: The purpose of this article was to assess the match between child passenger safety resources (child passenger safety technicians [CPSTs], car seat checks, and child restraint system [CRS] distribution programs) and the child population in Michigan by utilizing geographic information systems approaches and to analyze the impact of Michigan’s CPSTs on child passenger safety behaviors on departure from a seat check.Methods: Data were collected from administrative sources and a su...
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#1Jana A. Hirsch (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 12
#2Joe Grengs (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 10
Last. Ana V. Diez-Roux (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 83
view all 7 authors...
Investments in neighborhood built environments could increase physical activity and overall health. Disproportionate distribution of these changes in advantaged neighborhoods could inflate health disparities. Little information exists on where changes are occurring. This paper aims to 1) identify changes in the built environment in neighborhoods and 2) investigate associations between high levels of change and sociodemographic characteristics. Using Geographic Information Systems, neighborhood l...
11 CitationsSource
#1Michelle L. MacyH-Index: 20
#2Shannon J. BrinesH-Index: 15
Last. C. Raymond BinghamH-Index: 34
view all 7 authors...
#1Sydney A. Jones (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 7
#2Latetia V. Moore (CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)H-Index: 18
Last. Kelly R. Evenson (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 69
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Objective We conducted an ecological study to determine physical activity resource availability overall and by sociodemographic groups in parts of six states (CA, IL, MD, MN, NC, NY). Methods Data on parks and recreational facilities were collected from 3 sources in 2009–2012. Three measures characterized park and recreational facility availability at the census tract level: presence of ≥1 resource, number of resources, and resource kernel density. Associations between resource availabi...
20 CitationsSource
#1Jana A. HirschH-Index: 12
#2Kari MooreH-Index: 17
Last. Ana V. Diez-RouxH-Index: 83
view all 7 authors...
Objective To examine longitudinal associations of the neighborhood built environment with objectively measured body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) in a geographically and racial/ethnically diverse group of adults.
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#1Jana A. Hirsch (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 12
#2Kari Moore (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 17
Last. Ana V. Diez-Roux (Drexel University)H-Index: 83
view all 7 authors...
Objective To examine longitudinal associations of the neighborhood built environment with objectively measured body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) in a geographically and racial/ethnically diverse group of adults. Methods This study used data from 5,506 adult participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, aged 45-84 years in 2000 (baseline). BMI and WC were assessed at baseline and four follow-up visits (median follow-up 9.1 years). Time-varying built environment measu...
31 CitationsSource
#1Jana A. Hirsch (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 12
#2Kari Moore (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 17
Last. Ana V. Diez-Roux (Drexel University)H-Index: 83
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Jana A. Hirsch (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 12
#2Kari Moore (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 17
Last. Ana V. Diez-Roux (Drexel University)H-Index: 83
view all 8 authors...
Lack of longitudinal research hinders causal inference on the association between the built environment and walking. In the present study, we used data from 6,027 adults in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who were 45–84 years of age at baseline to investigate the association of neighborhood built environment with trends in the amount of walking between 2000 and 2012. Walking for transportation and walking for leisure were assessed at baseline and at 3 follow-up visits (median follow-up...
54 CitationsSource
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